Navigation Links
Study finds that drugs used for treatment of influenza in pregnancy appear to be safe
Date:4/27/2010

DALLAS April 29, 2010 Tamiflu and two other drugs used to treat influenza appear safe for pregnant women and their babies, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found in a retrospective study of 239 cases of women who received the medications during pregnancy.

The study provides "reassuring safety data about commonly used medications," the researchers concluded in their study, which appears in the April issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

"A woman has to balance the benefits and potential risks of any medication taken during pregnancy. But with influenza, the added risks of complications from the disease in pregnancy need to be considered," said Dr. George Wendel, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at UT Southwestern and senior author of the study.

"This is the first large study that systematically looked at the safety of all these drugs in pregnancy," he said.

Researchers analyzed the medical records of 82,336 women who gave birth at Parkland Memorial Hospital from 2003 to 2008, a period that spanned five flu seasons. The investigators compared two groups of pregnant women: women without flu and women with flu who had received one of three oral medications marketed under the brands Tamiflu, Relenza and Flumadine. Of the women studied, 239 had flu and had been treated with one of the three medications.

The study showed no difference in the mothers' rates of preeclampsia, preterm birth, gestational diabetes, premature membrane rupture, fever during labor or prolonged hospital stay.

After birth, there was no difference in birth weight, need for intensive care, seizures or jaundice among the babies. There also was no significant difference in stillbirths or major or minor malformations that could be attributed to the medications, the study showed.

The only significant difference involved a bowel condition, necrotizing enterocolitis, often associated with prematurity. Two premature babies in the treatment group were born with this condition. Each of the mothers, however, received a different anti-flu drug, so the prematurity may have been the major common factor, said Dr. Laura Greer, assistant instructor of obstetrics and gynecology and lead author of the paper.

One limitation of study was that only 13 percent of the women with flu were treated during the first trimester, a critical time in fetal development. "Overall, this study provides important safety data to guide clinicians and patients in treating influenza in pregnancy," Dr. Greer said.

The data collection stopped a year before the pandemic H1N1 flu strain, or swine flu, became widespread. Tamiflu was used in 2009 to treat pandemic H1N1 infection, a type of influenza A; it is also effective in treating seasonal influenza A and B infection. The other two medications were more commonly used in earlier influenza seasons.


'/>"/>

Contact: Aline McKenzie
aline.mckenzie@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Comparative-effectiveness study confirms new treatment for diabetic macular edema
2. CureTogether Announces Online Autism Treatment Study
3. LA BioMed awarded research grant to study HIV prevention gel
4. Study Makes Strides in Understanding Ovarian Cancer
5. Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
6. NIH study confirms location of stem cells near cartilage-rich regions in bones
7. Immune cells predict success of head and neck cancer treatment, U-M study finds
8. Noncardiac Chest Pain May Warrant More Management: Study
9. SGIC Study Finds Drivers Are Losing Their Cool At School
10. Health impacts of mobile phone use to be explored in huge new study
11. Study of Williams syndrome patients reveals specific genes role in intelligence
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Apple Rehab Shelton Lakes , which ... evacuation of the facility as part of a disaster drill on October 3rd. , ... and Shelton City Emergency Manager, as well as the Connecticut Long Term Care ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Ellevate Network, ... in business to advocate for action towards gender equality at their inaugural Summit in ... around the globe, and reached a social audience of over 3 million. To watch ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... viewers the lowdown on sciatica in a new episode of "Success Files," which ... current events and innovation and investigates each subject in-depth with passion and integrity. ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 13, 2017 , ... “America On The Brink”: the Christian history of the ... is the creation of published author, William Nowers. Captain Nowers and his wife, ... he spent thirty years in the Navy. Following his career as a naval ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... Orleans, LA (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... centers in the U.S., announced today its plans to open a flagship location in ... will occupy the former Rooms To Go store next to Office Depot in the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2017)... 10, 2017  NDS received FDA 510(k) clearance in May 2017 ... display stand specifically designed for endoscopy environments. An innovative secondary monitor ... clinical solution to support the improvement of patient outcomes, procedural efficiency, ... ... ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... Oct. 4, 2017  According to the Centers for Disease Control and ... October . PhysicianOne Urgent Care is helping communities across Massachusetts ... , by offering no-cost* flu shots through the end of the ... certain health insurance regulations. ... time to get a flu shot is by the end of October, ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... -- Halo Labs announces the European launch of their new low ... MIBio 2017 in Cambridge, U.K on October ... biopharmaceutical samples with unprecedented speed and sensitivity while using far less ... Imaging. ... analysis system ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: