Navigation Links
Study finds pregnant women with prior cesarean choose the delivery method preferred by their doctor

DALLAS (February 9, 2012) In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting , in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that women who have undergone one prior delivery via cesarean section appear to know little about the risks and benefits associated with undergoing either a second cesarean or trial of labor to attempt a vaginal delivery, and that the preference of their medical provider strongly affects their selection between the two options.

Although trial of labor after a prior cesarean is considered a reasonable option with an overall success rate of 60 to 80 percent, the majority of women who would be eligible for it undergo an elective repeat cesarean. The study, Trial of Labor After a Previous Cesarean Section Versus Repeat Cesarean Section: Are Patients Making an Informed Decision?, sought to determine if this is due, in large part, to poor education of patients on the risks and benefits of both options.

"Even though most women can achieve a vaginal delivery with trial of labor, less than 10 percent of them attempt to do so," said Sarah Bernstein, MD, with St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Obstetrics and Gynecology, in New York, and one of the study's authors. "In fact, when patients perceived that their doctor preferred a repeat cesarean, very few chose to undergo trial of labor, whereas the majority chose trial of labor if that was their doctor's preference."

Bernstein and her colleagues, Shira Matalon-Grazi and Barak Rosenn, also with St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Obstetrics and Gynecology, observed 155 women who presented at the hospital for delivery between November 2010 and July 2011, and had a history of one prior cesarean and no contraindications for trial of labor. Consenting women were asked to fill out a questionnaire upon presentation for labor and delivery, either prior to their scheduled repeat cesarean or upon admission for trial of labor.

The study found that 87 of the 155 chose to undergo trial of labor, with the remaining 68 opting for a repeat cesarean. There were no differences in age, level of education, ethnicity and provider type between the groups. Women in both groups demonstrated lack of knowledge on the risks and benefits of the options, particularly women in the elective repeat cesarean group. Specifically, patients were not familiar with the chances of a successful vaginal delivery with trial of labor (13 percent of trial of labor patients knew, as did four percent of cesarean patients), the effect of indication for previous cesarean on success, the risk of uterine rupture, and the increase in risk with each successive cesarean. Fifty-two percent of patients did not know which delivery method has a faster recovery time. When patients perceived their providers as having a preference for cesarean, only four percent chose trial of labor. Conversely, 43 percent chose trial of labor when they thought that was their provider's preference.


Contact: Vicki Bendure
Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine

Related medicine news :

1. Study finds prior preterm delivery indicates subsequent baby will be small even if carried to term
2. Spanking Produces Troubled Kids, Study Contends
3. Vulnerability to Anthrax Varies Widely: Study
4. CIHR invests in Queens-led study on end-of-life decision making
5. ROCK off: Study establishes molecular link between genetic defect and heart malformation
6. Hormel Institute study makes key finding in stem cell self-renewal
7. More Americans Seeking Love Online: Study
8. Diabetes Takes Toll on Womens Hearing: Study
9. New study to assess 3 simple, cost-effective strategies to promote healthy aging
10. Mouse Study Suggests Alzheimers Spreads Through Brain Like an Infection
11. People Pleasers More Prone to Overeating: Study
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/28/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Pixel Film Studios is back again with ProPanel: Pulse ... are endless. Users have full control over angle of view, speed method, start point, ... sure to get heads to turn. , ProPanel: Pulse offers fully customizable pulsating shape ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 27, 2015 , ... According to an article published November 15th ... are handling security in light of the recent terrorist attacks in Paris, other cities ... stop an attack from reaching U.S. soil. Especially around special events that may be ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... PA (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... how filthy the toilets were," said an inventor from Hillside, N.J. "Many people ... improved seat cover so that individuals will always be protected from germs." , ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... , ... MPWH, the No.1 Herpes-only dating community in the world, revealed that over 50% of ... than 3.7 billion people under the age of 50 – or 67% of the population ... global estimates of HSV-1 infection . , "The data shocks us highly!" said Michelle ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... The moment you stop improving ... only fulfilling the needs of advisers and clients but going above and beyond ... top-tier customer service. However, there's always room for improvement, which is why the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/26/2015)... , November 26, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... announced the addition of the  "2016 ... the European Cell Surface Marker Testing ... Opportunities"  report to their offering.  ... the addition of the  "2016 Future ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , Nov. 25, 2015  Linden Care, LLC, a ... treatment outcomes for patients suffering from chronic pain, said ... a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) enjoining Express Scripts from ... companies. --> --> ... of its legal options. --> ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... , November 25, 2015 ... KTOV ) (TASE: KTOV), a biopharmaceutical company focused on ... of various clinical conditions, today announced the closing of ... Depository Shares ( ADSs ), each representing 20 ordinary ... to 3,158,900 ADSs. The ADSs and warrants were issued ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: