Navigation Links
Study finds novel therapy that may prevent damage to the retina in diabetic eye diseases
Date:7/27/2012

Researchers at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center have identified a compound that could interrupt the chain of events that cause damage to the retina in diabetic retinopathy. The finding is significant because it could lead to a novel therapy that targets two mechanisms at the root of the disease: inflammation and the weakening of the blood barrier that protects the retina.

To date, treatments for diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness among working-age Americans, have been aimed largely at one of those mechanisms.

In diabetic retinopathy, damage to the retina results, in part, from the activity of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein that weakens the protective blood-retinal barrier. Recent drugs targeting VEGF have exhibited good response for nearly half of the patients with diabetic retinopathy. But researchers believe that there is also an inflammatory component that may contribute to the disease process.

The study, published in the Biochemical Journal, June 2012 [epub ahead of print] identifies a specific protein common to both pathways as an important target in regulating the disease process in which blood vessels become leaky, and provides a drug that may be developed into a therapeutic intervention for patients in which anti-VEGF treatment alone is not sufficient.

"In diabetic retinopathy and a host of other retinal diseases, increases in VEGF and inflammatory factors some of the same factors that contribute to the response to an infection cause blood vessels in the eye to leak which, in turn, results in a buildup of fluid in the neural tissue of the retina," says David A. Antonetti, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and Molecular and Integrative Physiology, who has also been awarded a Jules and Doris Stein Professorship from Research to Prevent Blindness. "This insidious form of modified inflammation can eventually lead to blindness."

The compound targets atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), required for VEGF to make blood vessels leak. Moreover, Antonetti's laboratory has demonstrated that the compound is effective at blocking damage from tumor necrosis factor also elevated in diabetic retinopathy that comprises part of the inflammation. Benefits of this compound could extend to therapies for uveitis, or changes to the brain blood vessels in the presence of brain tumors or stroke.

"This is a great leap forward," says Antonetti. "We've identified an important target in regulating blood vessel leakage in the eye and we have a therapy that works in animal models. Our research is in the early stages of development. We still have a long way to go to demonstrate effectiveness of this compound in humans to create a new therapy but the results are very promising."


'/>"/>

Contact: Barbara Sefton
bwsefton@umich.edu
734-763-6967
University of Michigan Health System
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Weight Control Can Cut Womens Diabetes Risk, Study Shows
2. Study finds gaps in services for heterosexual men with HIV
3. Study: Group yoga improves motor function and balance long after stroke
4. HIV Undetectable in 2 Men After Bone Marrow Transplants: Study
5. Using Exhaust Fan on a Gas Stove Cuts Pollution: Study
6. MRSA cases in academic hospitals double in 5 years: study
7. Illegal Bath Salts Mimic Cocaine in the Brain: Study
8. Experimental Drug Suppresses Appetite in Mice: Study
9. NIH-funded study finds high HIV infection rates among gay and bisexual black men in the US
10. Untreated Heartburn May Raise Risk for Esophageal Cancer, Study Says
11. Cancer Drug May Flush Out Hidden HIV: Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... 07, 2016 , ... Facial plastic surgeon, Dr. John D. Rachel of ... of proceeds to two local organizations: North Chicago Animal Control and Friends and Our ... a team of authorized and trained volunteers who support rescued animals held in the ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... , ... December 07, 2016 , ... ... Dallas, Texas, is condemning "scam operations" carried out by unethical locksmith companies and ... scam operations to a halt. According to Texas Premier Locksmith, these fraudulent locksmith ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... December 07, 2016 , ... The ... the holidays and winter seasons. One major study analyzing heart attacks among 138,602 ... to August of a given year. We would all agree of course–no time of ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... , ... December 07, 2016 , ... ... 2016 BOC Business Brilliance Awards under the Best New Product Launch category. Gensuite’s ... achieved through user experience. , BOC Global Events & Training Group is a ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... Maureen ... Program at Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT). McLaughlin brings nearly 20 years ... three acupuncturists to help patients realize their family building goals. Acupuncture helps ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/7/2016)... -- KEY FINDINGS Patient warming and ... loss of blood during surgeries, lowering the risks ... after surgeries, and decreasing risks of SSIs. The ... warming system, surface warming systems, and intravascular warming ... at hospitals thus, lowering the healthcare costs by ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... 7, 2016 Research and Markets has announced ... User - Global Forecast to 2021" report to their offering. ... , , ... by 2021, growing at a CAGR of 7.3% during the forecast period ... prevalence of cancer and rapidly increasing geriatric population across the globe are ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... Dec. 7, 2016 DelveInsight,s, "Janus ... provides in depth insights on the pipeline ... Janus Kinase 3 (JAK3) Inhibitors. The DelveInsight,s ... stages of development including Discovery, Pre-clinical, IND, ... Preregistration. Report covers the product clinical trials ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: