Navigation Links
Study finds marked rise in intensely sexualized images of women, not men
Date:8/10/2011

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- A study by University at Buffalo sociologists has found that the portrayal of women in the popular media over the last several decades has become increasingly sexualized, even "pornified." The same is not true of the portrayal of men.

These findings may be cause for concern, the researchers say, because previous research has found sexualized images of women to have far-reaching negative consequences for both men and women.

Erin Hatton, PhD, and Mary Nell Trautner, PhD, assistant professors in the UB Department of Sociology, are the authors of "Equal Opportunity Objectification? The Sexualization of Men and Women on the Cover of Rolling Stone," which examines the covers of Rolling Stone magazine from 1967 to 2009 to measure changes in the sexualization of men and women in popular media over time.

The study will be published in the September issue of the journal Sexuality & Culture and is available at http://www.springerlink.com/content/k722255851qh46u8.

"We chose Rolling Stone," explains Hatton, "because it is a well-established, pop-culture media outlet. It is not explicitly about sex or relationships; foremost it is about music. But it also covers politics, film, television and current events, and so offers a useful window into how women and men are portrayed generally in popular culture."

After analyzing more than 1,000 images of men and women on Rolling Stone covers over the course of 43 years, the authors came to several conclusions. First, representations of both women and men have indeed become more sexualized over time; and, second, women continue to be more frequently sexualized than men. Their most striking finding, however, was the change in how intensely sexualized images of women -- but not men -- have become.

In order to measure the intensity of sexualized representations men and women, the authors developed a "scale of sexualization." An image was given "points" for being sexualized if, for example, the subject's lips were parted or his/her tongue was showing, the subject was only partially clad or naked, or the text describing the subject used explicitly sexual language.

Based on this scale, the authors identified three categories of images: a) those that were, for the most part, not sexualized (i.e., scoring 0-4 points on the scale), b) those that were sexualized (5-10 points), and c) those that were so intensely sexualized that the authors labeled them "hypersexualized" (11-23 points).

In the 1960s they found that 11 percent of men and 44 percent of women on the covers of Rolling Stone were sexualized. In the 2000s, 17 percent of men were sexualized (an increase of 55 percent from the 1960s), and 83 percent of women were sexualized (an increase of 89 percent). Among those images that were sexualized, 2 percent of men and 61 percent of women were hypersexualized. "In the 2000s," Hatton says, "there were 10 times more hypersexualized images of women than men, and 11 times more non-sexualized images of men than of women."

"What we conclude from this is that popular media outlets such as Rolling Stone are not depicting women as sexy musicians or actors; they are depicting women musicians and actors as ready and available for sex. This is problematic," Hatton says, "because it indicates a decisive narrowing of media representations of women.

"We don't necessarily think it's problematic for women to be portrayed as 'sexy.' But we do think it is problematic when nearly all images of women depict them not simply as 'sexy women' but as passive objects for someone else's sexual pleasure."

These findings are important, the authors say, because a plethora of research has found such images to have a range of negative consequences:

"Sexualized portrayals of women have been found to legitimize or exacerbate violence against women and girls, as well as sexual harassment and anti-women attitudes among men and boys," Hatton says. "Such images also have been shown to increase rates of body dissatisfaction and/or eating disorders among men, women and girls; and they have even been shown to decrease sexual satisfaction among both men and women."

"For these reasons," says Hatton, "we find the frequency of sexualized images of women in popular media, combined with the extreme intensity of their sexualization, to be cause for concern."


'/>"/>

Contact: Patricia Donovan
pdonovan@buffalo.edu
716-645-4602
University at Buffalo
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Despite Treatment, Employees with Depression Generate Higher Absentee Costs, According to Thomson Reuters Study
2. American Council on Exercise (ACE) Study Reveals Kettlebells Provide Powerful Workout in Short Amount of Time
3. TV drama can be more persuasive than news program, study finds
4. Study carried out into biological risks of eating reptiles
5. Neuroimaging study may pave way for effective Alzheimers treatments
6. Study finds racial gaps continue in heart disease awareness
7. Luth Researchs IndicatorEDG(TM) Study Finds Americans Hopes of Achieving Their Dreams Are Fading
8. First blinded study of venous insufficiency prevalence in MS shows promising results
9. Soothing infants with food focus of childhood obesity study
10. People with anxiety disorder less able to regulate response to negative emotions, study shows
11. American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report: Study Finds Racial Gaps Continue in Heart Disease Awareness, Low Knowledge of Heart Attack Warning Signs Among Women
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Study finds marked rise in intensely sexualized images of women, not men
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... ... Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at The House of Yahweh has posted a new publication this ... generation is a time like no other and society needs to understand the only way ... does not want to sound like an old bible beater because religion has a bad ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Doctor C LLC, a company based out of Arizona that ... continue the marketing and distribution of its product, The Right C. , The Right ... absorption than traditional vitamin C supplements. At the trade show, Doctor C had the ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... 20, 2017 , ... Lice Troopers, the lice removal company based in South ... since the holiday season. , β€œIt happens every year around this time,” says ... taking photos, which is the head-to-head gateway that lice need to spread.” , As ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... FL (PRWEB) , ... January 20, 2017 , ... International ... of nutritional and bodybuilding supplements, announced it attended the January ECRM trade show in ... bodybuilder and nutritional scientist who was determined to create a line of products that ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... ... January 20, 2017 , ... "TransFlare 4K Mystique comes ... of Final Cut Pro X," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. ... Utilizing the Dragon Sensor,TransFlare 4K Mystique lens flare and light leak transitions have a ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... , Jan. 19, 2017 ViewRay, Inc. (Nasdaq: ... federal institution supporting research in Germany ... patient treatments at the University Clinic Heidelberg as part ... The MRIdian Linac program will be headed by Medical ... heads radiation oncology at the German Cancer Research Center ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... LONDON , January 19, 2017 ... New Therapeutic Option to Address Motor Symptoms and ... ...      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20151014/276718LOGO) ... Fabrizio Stocchi , European Neurological Review,2016;11(Suppl. 2): 2-15, ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... , Jan. 18, 2017  ViewRay, Inc. (Nasdaq: ... first and only clinical MRI-guided radiation therapy system, announced ... of approximately $26.1 million through a private placement ... Management led the financing and was joined by ... LLC and Kearny Venture Partners, and an additional ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: