Navigation Links
Study finds hospitals of last resort deliver lower quality of lung cancer care
Date:9/9/2011

A new study finds that lung cancer patients treated in hospitals that care for a high percentage of uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients, so-called "high safety-net burden facilities," were significantly less likely to undergo surgery that was intended to cure the cancer compared to patients treated at low safety-net burden facilities. This difference persisted even after controlling for other factors that significantly decreased the likelihood of curative-intent surgery, such as race, insurance status, stage, and female gender as well as other hospital characteristics.

This study is the first to examine the impact of safety-net burden status on access to curative-intent surgery for lung cancer patients nationwide. Researchers led by Katherine S. Virgo, Ph.D., used the National Cancer Database (NCDB) to review the treatment of more than 50,000 patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer who were treated at American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer accredited facilities throughout the United States. They found that 67.1 percent of patients treated at high safety-net burden hospitals underwent surgery intended to cure their disease, compared to 77.1 percent of those at low safety-net burden centers (odds ratio 0.69; 95% CI, 0.62-0.77).

"This study adds to the growing literature about the ability of the so-called safety-net to catch patients in need of care," said Dr. Virgo. "It demonstrates that access to high quality lung cancer care is less than optimal at high-safety net burden facilities."

The authors say while the reasons for the disparities are not fully understood, it appears that reimbursement issues may play a role. Some care centers likely lack full and unrestricted availability and/or participation of specialists, including thoracic surgeons, because treating uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients is less lucrative and/or hospital compensation is insufficient. Addressing the problem may require innovative solutions to ensure quality cancer care by strengthening the safety net to ensure needy patients receive appropriate care, including securing additional funding for safety-net facilities.


'/>"/>

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Despite Treatment, Employees with Depression Generate Higher Absentee Costs, According to Thomson Reuters Study
2. American Council on Exercise (ACE) Study Reveals Kettlebells Provide Powerful Workout in Short Amount of Time
3. TV drama can be more persuasive than news program, study finds
4. Study carried out into biological risks of eating reptiles
5. Neuroimaging study may pave way for effective Alzheimers treatments
6. Study finds racial gaps continue in heart disease awareness
7. Luth Researchs IndicatorEDG(TM) Study Finds Americans Hopes of Achieving Their Dreams Are Fading
8. First blinded study of venous insufficiency prevalence in MS shows promising results
9. Soothing infants with food focus of childhood obesity study
10. People with anxiety disorder less able to regulate response to negative emotions, study shows
11. American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report: Study Finds Racial Gaps Continue in Heart Disease Awareness, Low Knowledge of Heart Attack Warning Signs Among Women
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... ... FASTBRACES® in Carnegie, OK, from Dr. Jamie Cameron, with or without a ... compared to traditional orthodontic treatment. Depending on each patient’s case, treatment with the ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... Mich. (PRWEB) , ... March ... ... and Manufacturer Alliance (GRMA) is growing as it continues developing an ANSI-approved, ... supplement industry. The organization, which plans to publish the first ANSI-approved GMP ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... ... documenting and diagramming network and data center assets and audio-video devices has recently ... request new equipment shapes for free and download shapes and stencils from ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... An inventor from Raynham, ... bands used in conjunction with my braces always rubbed against the inside of ... to prevent this problem." The O.B.S. was the result of his brainstorming. , ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... The assembly of ... protocols involve many repetitive steps and often scientists require many different versions of ... needed, and results in a lower error rate and cost saving for reagents ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017  NuVasive, Inc. ... on transforming spine surgery with minimally disruptive, procedurally-integrated ... (FDA) 510(k) clearance of the CoRoent® Small Interbody™ ... contiguous levels in the cervical spine. This marks ... to be used at up to four contiguous ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... SILVER SPRING, Md. , March 29, 2017 On ... Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) to treat adult patients with relapsing forms ... (PPMS). This is the first drug approved by the ... by a health care professional.  "Multiple ... life," said Billy Dunn , M.D., director of ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017 ... Sectra (STO: SECT B) announces that ... install Sectra PACS in their healthcare enterprise. The ... Epic EMR, will enable access and sharing of ... Additionally, UPHS and Sectra will enter into a ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: