Navigation Links
Study finds blacks more likely to be readmitted to hospitals after discharge
Date:2/15/2011

Boston, MA Elderly black patients were more likely to be readmitted to the hospital after a prior hospital stay for a heart attack, heart failure, or pneumonia, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. They found that the higher readmission rates were due to disparities related to both race and the hospitals where patients were treated.

"Disparities in health and health care are well-documented in this country, but little was previously known about whether there were disparities in hospital readmissions at the national level," said Karen Joynt, lead author of the study, a research fellow in the department of health policy and management at HSPH, and a physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) in Boston. "We found important racial disparities among elderly Americans: Black patients were more likely to be readmitted after being discharged from the hospital, and this was especially true if the discharging hospital cared for a high proportion of minority patients."

The study appears in the February 16, 2011 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Joynt and her colleagues, E. John Orav, associate professor of biostatistics at HSPH, and senior author Ashish Jha, a physician and associate professor of health policy and management at HSPH, analyzed Medicare data on 30-day readmissions after hospitalization for three conditions: heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia. They found that black patients had about 13% higher odds of readmission than white patients, regardless of where they received their care. Additionally, patients discharged from hospitals with a high proportion of minority patients had about 23% higher odds of readmission than patients discharged from hospitals with a lower proportion of minorities, regardless of race.

The results were even more striking when those two factors were combined. For example, following a heart attack, black patients discharged from hospitals with a high proportion of minorities had 35% higher odds of readmission than white patients discharged from hospitals with a lower proportion of minorities.

Eliminating health disparities and reducing readmissions are two important goals for policymakers. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act calls for financial penalties for hospitals that do a poor job of reducing readmissions. "Our findings suggest that to reduce racial disparities in readmissions, policymakers will need to focus not just on race, but also on where minority patients are receiving their care," said Joynt.


'/>"/>

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-998-8819
Harvard School of Public Health
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Despite Treatment, Employees with Depression Generate Higher Absentee Costs, According to Thomson Reuters Study
2. American Council on Exercise (ACE) Study Reveals Kettlebells Provide Powerful Workout in Short Amount of Time
3. TV drama can be more persuasive than news program, study finds
4. Study carried out into biological risks of eating reptiles
5. Neuroimaging study may pave way for effective Alzheimers treatments
6. Study finds racial gaps continue in heart disease awareness
7. Luth Researchs IndicatorEDG(TM) Study Finds Americans Hopes of Achieving Their Dreams Are Fading
8. First blinded study of venous insufficiency prevalence in MS shows promising results
9. Soothing infants with food focus of childhood obesity study
10. People with anxiety disorder less able to regulate response to negative emotions, study shows
11. American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report: Study Finds Racial Gaps Continue in Heart Disease Awareness, Low Knowledge of Heart Attack Warning Signs Among Women
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/22/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... August 22, 2017 , ... “To Walk ... radioman on a B17 bomber named Edward Koontz. “To Walk Away” is the creation ... Scranton, who has published over two hundred manuscripts in chemistry and religion, as well ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... 2017 , ... “Without Love’s Beauty and Pleasures Life Does ... faced while hoping for a better life. “Without Love’s Beauty and Pleasures Life ... spent 13 years working with deprived/neglected adolescents and almost 20 years working with ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... “Glimpses Of Light”: is ... world. “Glimpses Of Light” is the creation of published author, J.M. Shepherd, a writer, ... of answers to life’s perplexing mysteries. , Shepherd shares, “Love is one of the ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... TopConsumerReviews.com recently gave a best-in-class 5-star ... . , As the stress of modern life continually makes more demands on time ... of artificial stimulants can trap people in vicious high/low cycles and can also cause ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... Hammond, Indiana (PRWEB) , ... August 22, 2017 , ... ... the Fourth of July, many communities have begun providing weekend displays, and numerous households ... for most humans, they can be downright terrifying for pets. , Kris Zambo, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/15/2017)... 2017  AOTI Inc. announced today that its fully owned ... opened a New York City Office in Yonkers, New ... Topical Wound Oxygen (TWO 2 ) homecare therapy. This new East ... Health Care (ACHC) under the company,s DMEPOS accreditation for Home/Durable Medical ... Advanced Oxygen ...
(Date:8/10/2017)... Aug. 10, 2017  Physical Rehabilitation Network (PRN), acquired the ... Lakewood, Colorado . The reputable clinic will continue ... PT, DPT with his staff of four clinicians. Lipkin received ... and brings over 10 years of experience with a strong ... Belmar PT marks the 10th PRN clinic in and around the ...
(Date:8/7/2017)... 2017 Insightin Health, provider of data-driven ... engagement, announced the selection of Michael Wood ... effective as of February 2017. In this role, Wood ... for our clients. Wood brings with him more ... business analytics within the healthcare industry. Wood formerly ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: