Navigation Links
Study finds aggressive glycemic control in diabetic cabg patients does not improve survival
Date:9/27/2011

(Boston) Surgeons from Boston Medical Center (BMC) have found that in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, aggressive glycemic control does not result in any significant improvement of clinical outcomes as compared with moderate control. The findings, which appear in this month's issue of Annals of Surgery, also found the incidence of hypoglycemic events increased with aggressive glycemic control.

Currently, 40 percent of all patients undergoing CABG suffer from diabetes, and this number is quickly rising. Traditionally these patients have more complications following surgery, including greater risk of heart attacks, more wound infections and reduced long-term survival.

Maintaining serum glucose between 120-180 mg/dl with continuous insulin infusions decreases morbidity in diabetic patients undergoing CABG. Prior studies in surgical patients requiring prolonged ventilation suggest that aggressive glycemic control (less than 120 mg/dl) may improve survival. However, its effect in diabetic CABG patients is unknown.

Eighty-two diabetic patients undergoing CABG were prospectively randomized to receive either aggressive glycemic control or moderate glycemic control using continuous intravenous insulin solutions beginning at anesthesia and continuing for 18 hours after surgery.

According to BMC cardiothoracic surgeon Harold Lazar, MD, who authored the presentation, there was no difference in the incidence of major adverse effects between the two groups. "Aggressive glycemic control did not result in any significant improvement of clinical outcomes than can be achieved with moderate control," said Lazar, who is also a professor of cardiothoracic surgery at Boston University School of Medicine "Although aggressive glycemic control did increase the incidence of hypoglycemic events, it did not result in an increased incidence of neurological events," he added.


'/>"/>

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1

Related medicine news :

1. Spinal Surgery Riskier for Certain Patients, Study Finds
2. Sleepy Teens Prone to Bad Behaviors, Study Finds
3. People learn while they sleep, study suggests
4. Lots of Coffee Might Lower Depression Risk: Study
5. Prevention of bedsores in long-term care homes cost-effective, study shows
6. Many Doctors Think Patients Get Over-Treated, Study Says
7. Study examining large-scale data of double balloon enteroscopy shows it is safe and effective
8. Boston researchers share in $10 million grant to study HIV and alcohol
9. Cell Transplantation study shows bone growth from implanted tooth and dental pulp stem cells
10. Bone Drug Fails to Prevent Breast Cancer Recurrence: Study
11. Study shows decisions over life-sustaining treatment are likely to change
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/20/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... July 19, 2017 , ... ... a $1.5 million Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant to train predoctoral ... special health care needs in rural and underserved areas. , The Predoctoral Pediatric ...
(Date:7/20/2017)... ... 19, 2017 , ... A July 7th article ... varicose veins in some patients, according to medical experts. Washington State medical clinic ... excessive sitting or standing, or regularly nicking yourself while shaving your legs, and ...
(Date:7/18/2017)... ... 18, 2017 , ... CannaKids, a California Cooperative Cooperation that specializes in the ... the WORLDZ Summit, taking place in Hollywood from July 31-August 1, the Company’s ... cannabis for both pediatric and adult patients, and how the path has led her ...
(Date:7/18/2017)... ... July 18, 2017 , ... The results of an international clinical trial, led in part by ... severe type of muscular dystrophy holds promise for a subgroup of patients. , In a ... and colleagues at 53 study sites in 18 countries describe the clinical benefit of using ...
(Date:7/18/2017)... ... July 18, 2017 , ... An inventor from Seattle, Wash., has developed ... to clean, scrub and moisturize the back and other hard-to-reach areas of the body. ... movement in my upper body, particularly my shoulders. I found it difficult to reach ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:7/11/2017)... Corp., also known as ,The Epigenetics Company, announced today the release of ... using the myDNAge ™ test. Based on Horvath,s Clock, so named ... biostatistics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA ... ™ technology is used to analyze DNA methylation patterns of over ... Epigenetic ...
(Date:7/11/2017)... , July 11, 2017 Oramed Pharmaceuticals ... a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company focused on the development of ... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has agreed to schedule ... completed Phase IIb trial of its oral insulin capsule ... Phase IIb trial met primary and secondary endpoints by ...
(Date:7/10/2017)... TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. , July 10, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... a $5m Convertible Note to support the development of ... by Tencent Holdings Limited, a leading Chinese Internet services ... This funding will advance multiple infectious disease product programs ... Founded by Dr. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: