Navigation Links
Study examines link between incarceration and psychiatric disorders

WASHINGTON, DC, January 16, 2013 Psychiatric disorders are prevalent among current and former inmates of correctional institutions, but what has been less clear is whether incarceration causes these disorders or, alternatively, whether inmates have these problems before they enter prison. A study co-authored by Jason Schnittker, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, shows that many of the most common psychiatric disorders found among former inmates, including impulse control disorders, emerge in childhood and adolescence and, therefore, predate incarceration. Yet, incarceration seems to lead to some mood related psychiatric disorders, such as major depression, which have important implications for what happens to inmates after their release.

Michael Massoglia, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Christopher Uggen, a professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota, co-authored the study, "Out and Down: Incarceration and Psychiatric Disorders," which appears in the current issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Using data from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, which took place between 2001 and 2003, the researchers examined the relationship between incarceration and psychiatric disorders after statistically adjusting for influences that might affect both, including an impoverished childhood background.

Their results reveal robust and long-lasting relationships between incarceration and psychiatric conditions that adversely affect one's mood, such as major depression.

"These conditions, in turn, are strongly related to other impairments, including a diminished capacity to form social relationships and to focus on daily activities including work," said Schnittker. "Although often neglected as a consequence of incarceration, mood related conditions might explain some of the difficulties former inmates experience following release."

In the study's conclusion, the researchers suggest that mental health treatment could help former inmates reintegrate into society and they encourage efforts to facilitate this. "Even though many former inmates want to get back on their feet after release, they experience numerous difficulties in doing so, some legal, some social, and some personal," Schnittker said. "Being depressed probably makes all of these obstacles even more difficult to overcome. Reentry requires motivation, and depression can rob you of that."

Schnittker's research interests are in medical sociology, focusing on mental health, physical health, and the relationship between the two. His current research on the effects of incarceration on the health of individuals, families, and communities is funded in part by a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award in Health Policy.

Contact: Daniel Fowler
American Sociological Association

Related medicine news :

1. Blood Clots During Pregnancy More Likely After IVF, Study Says
2. New SMU-North Texas food bank study to analyze causes of hunger in North Texas
3. Unneeded Antibiotics May Lead to Diarrheal Illness, Study Finds
4. Study Finds Low Flu Vaccine Rates in U.S. Kids
5. Kaiser Permanente study: Change in PSA levels over time can help predict aggressive prostate cancer
6. Study documents that some children lose autism diagnosis
7. Berries May Cut Heart Attack Risk in Women, Study Says
8. Pot Use-Low IQ Link Challenged in Study
9. Doctors Often Miss Signs of Problem Drinking in Patients, Study Finds
10. No Link Between Low Birth Weight, Asthma: Study
11. Study finds knee replacement surgery may lead to weight gain
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/30/2015)... , ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... Solutions, announced at the Radiology Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, being ... over 60% growth from 2014. Throughout 2015, the company has completed installations ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... Since its inception, Seniors ... independent living, assisted living and all other retirement options. Support for issues surrounding ... research remains a top priority. , So it’s no surprise that every ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... “Value-Based Payer-Provider Partnerships: Three Case Studies,” an upcoming Dec. 8 virtual conference ... Health and UCare, MissionPoint Health Partners, and Intel Corp. Leaders from these ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... 30, 2015 , ... Vasont Systems, a top component content ... extension unites with Syncro Soft’s latest software update, oXygen XML editor Version 17.1. ... the latest release of oXygen® XML editor and the Vasont® CCMS. , ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... Scott ... one of a select few plastic surgeons in the New York City area ... SculpSure™ is the world’s first heat-induced laser treatment for fat loss in the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... , Nov. 30, 2015   Nuance Communications, Inc. ... National Decision Support Company (NDSC) today jointly announced ... collaboration capabilities that utilize the American College of Radiology,s ... provider organizations to comply with current and emerging ... --> By combining clinical decision support, ...
(Date:11/30/2015)...  Novartis will demonstrate the strength of its research ... Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting. Presentations will highlight ... supportive care, including key findings in rare and difficult-to-treat ... ASH Annual Meeting will be held December 5-8 in ... Oncology . "We will be presenting encouraging overall survival ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... REHOVOT, Israel , Nov. 30, 2015 ... focused on acquiring and developing innovative therapies for ear, ... of Keith A. Katkin as chairman of ... Flesher , chief executive officer for OticPharma, Ltd.  "Keith ... As chairman, he will be able to share this ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: