Navigation Links
Study examines link between incarceration and psychiatric disorders
Date:1/16/2013

WASHINGTON, DC, January 16, 2013 Psychiatric disorders are prevalent among current and former inmates of correctional institutions, but what has been less clear is whether incarceration causes these disorders or, alternatively, whether inmates have these problems before they enter prison. A study co-authored by Jason Schnittker, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, shows that many of the most common psychiatric disorders found among former inmates, including impulse control disorders, emerge in childhood and adolescence and, therefore, predate incarceration. Yet, incarceration seems to lead to some mood related psychiatric disorders, such as major depression, which have important implications for what happens to inmates after their release.

Michael Massoglia, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Christopher Uggen, a professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota, co-authored the study, "Out and Down: Incarceration and Psychiatric Disorders," which appears in the current issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Using data from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, which took place between 2001 and 2003, the researchers examined the relationship between incarceration and psychiatric disorders after statistically adjusting for influences that might affect both, including an impoverished childhood background.

Their results reveal robust and long-lasting relationships between incarceration and psychiatric conditions that adversely affect one's mood, such as major depression.

"These conditions, in turn, are strongly related to other impairments, including a diminished capacity to form social relationships and to focus on daily activities including work," said Schnittker. "Although often neglected as a consequence of incarceration, mood related conditions might explain some of the difficulties former inmates experience following release."

In the study's conclusion, the researchers suggest that mental health treatment could help former inmates reintegrate into society and they encourage efforts to facilitate this. "Even though many former inmates want to get back on their feet after release, they experience numerous difficulties in doing so, some legal, some social, and some personal," Schnittker said. "Being depressed probably makes all of these obstacles even more difficult to overcome. Reentry requires motivation, and depression can rob you of that."

Schnittker's research interests are in medical sociology, focusing on mental health, physical health, and the relationship between the two. His current research on the effects of incarceration on the health of individuals, families, and communities is funded in part by a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award in Health Policy.


'/>"/>
Contact: Daniel Fowler
pubinfo@asanet.org
202-527-7885
American Sociological Association
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Blood Clots During Pregnancy More Likely After IVF, Study Says
2. New SMU-North Texas food bank study to analyze causes of hunger in North Texas
3. Unneeded Antibiotics May Lead to Diarrheal Illness, Study Finds
4. Study Finds Low Flu Vaccine Rates in U.S. Kids
5. Kaiser Permanente study: Change in PSA levels over time can help predict aggressive prostate cancer
6. Study documents that some children lose autism diagnosis
7. Berries May Cut Heart Attack Risk in Women, Study Says
8. Pot Use-Low IQ Link Challenged in Study
9. Doctors Often Miss Signs of Problem Drinking in Patients, Study Finds
10. No Link Between Low Birth Weight, Asthma: Study
11. Study finds knee replacement surgery may lead to weight gain
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/19/2017)... , ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... a medical capacity this year. Drs. Alexander Paziotopoulos, Andrew Petersen and Trish Henrie-Barrus ... condensed version of the clinic’s leading recovery program. , “We know it’s ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... Bio-Optronics Inc. is ... modern CTMS workflow designed to seamlessly integrate and streamline the way researchers prepare ... single page, maximizing usability and improving efficiency significantly for users – a first ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... panel system. , The Tranquility privacy panel system was designed to deliver ... Tranquility panels help reduce noise and provide the visual privacy required to maintain ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... 19, 2017 , ... Rountree Brady Insurance Agency, a Savannah ... eastern Georgia, is embarking on a charity effort to raise awareness and gather ... every year than anything else, yet risk factors associated with heart disease are ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Attorney Robert “RC” Pate , founder of The Law ... Triumph Over Kid Cancer foundation. Each year, 175,000 children are diagnosed with pediatric cancers. ... the effect of the critical funding gap for research into pediatric cancer research. From ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... January 18, 2017 , , Marks E-QURE ... distribution agreement, following similar agreements in Israel ... Wound care is $2 5 billion ... E-QURE Corp. (OTCQB: EQUR), a leader in medical devices for the treatment of ... Médica Equipos Médicos S.A.S. (TeckMedica) in Colombia for the ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 18, 2017   Synthetic Biologics, Inc. ... therapeutics designed to preserve the microbiome to protect ... plans to initiate a Phase 2b/3 adaptive pivotal ... lovastatin lactone designed to reduce methane production by ... gut to treat the underlying cause of irritable ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... PAUL, Minn. , Jan. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ ... developer of medical devices using neuroblocking technology to ... today announced the pricing of an underwritten public ... million, prior to deducting underwriting discounts and commissions ... The offering is comprised of Class A Units, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: