Navigation Links
Study examines global availability of treatment involving transplantation of blood stem cells
Date:4/27/2010

This release is available in Chinese.

An examination of the world-wide use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), which involves transplantation of blood stem cells derived from the bone marrow or blood, finds that there are significant differences in transplant rates between countries and continental regions by indication and donor type, and that HSCT is most frequently used in countries with higher gross national incomes and governmental health care expenditures, according to a study in the April 28 issue of JAMA.

"HSCT has become the standard of care for many patients with defined congenital or acquired disorders of the hematopoietic system [pertaining to the formation of blood cells] or with chemosensitive, radiosensitive, or immunosensitive malignancies. Over the last 2 decades, HSCT has seen rapid expansion in use and a constant evolution in its technology," the authors write. "It requires significant infrastructure and a network of specialists from all fields of medicine. Hence, information on indications, use of specific technologies, and trends in the application of HSCT is essential for correct patient counseling and for health care agencies to prepare the necessary infrastructure and to avoid planning errors." Little is known about HSCT use and the factors associated with it on a global level.

Alois Gratwohl, M.D., of University Hospital Basel, Switzerland, and colleagues conducted a study to assess differences in the application of HSCT on a global level and to examine associations of various factors with transplant rates. The study included patients receiving allogeneic (genetically different) and autologous (derived from the same individual) HSCTs for 2006, collected by 1,327 centers in 71 participating countries of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. The regional areas used in this study were (1) the Americas (the corresponding World Health Organization regions are North and South America); (2) Asia (Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific Region, which includes Australia and New Zealand); (3) Europe (includes Turkey and Israel); and (4) the Eastern Mediterranean and Africa.

A total of 50,417 first HSCTs were reported for 2006; 43 percent were allogeneic, 57 percent autologous. Most of the autologous HSCTs occurred in the Americas and Europe. The most frequent malignant disease for an allogeneic HSCT was acute myeloid leukemia (33 percent); the most frequent nonmalignant disease was bone marrow failure syndrome (6 percent); and the most frequent indication for an autologous HSCT was a plasma cell disorder (41 percent).

"Use of allogeneic or autologous HSCT, unrelated or family donors for allogeneic HSCT, and proportions of disease indications varied significantly between countries and regions. In linear regression analyses, government health care expenditures, HSCT team density (indicates the number of transplant teams per one million inhabitants), human development index, and gross national income per capita showed the highest associations with HSCT rates," the authors write.

Most of the 50,417 HSCTs were performed in Europe (48 percent), followed by the Americas (36 percent), Asia (14 percent), and the Eastern Mediterranean and Africa (2 percent). The median (midpoint) HSCT rates (per 10 million inhabitants) varied between the continental regions and between participating countries, from 48.5 in the Americas, 184 in Asia, 268.9 in Europe, and 47.7 in the Eastern Mediterranean and Africa. No HSCTs were performed in countries with less than 300,000 inhabitants, smaller than 960 km2, or having less than U.S. $680 gross national income per capita.

"In conclusion, this global overview on HSCT activity demonstrates that it is an accepted therapy worldwide, with different needs and priorities in different regions. Transplant activity is concentrated in countries with higher health care expenditures, higher gross national income per capita, and higher team density; hence, the availability of resources, governmental support, and access to a transplant center determine regional HSCT activity," the researchers write.


'/>"/>

Contact: Alois Gratwohl, M.D.
hematology@uhbs.ch
JAMA and Archives Journals
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study finds that drugs used for treatment of influenza in pregnancy appear to be safe
2. Comparative-effectiveness study confirms new treatment for diabetic macular edema
3. CureTogether Announces Online Autism Treatment Study
4. LA BioMed awarded research grant to study HIV prevention gel
5. Study Makes Strides in Understanding Ovarian Cancer
6. Brown Rice Tied to Better Heart Health in Study
7. NIH study confirms location of stem cells near cartilage-rich regions in bones
8. Immune cells predict success of head and neck cancer treatment, U-M study finds
9. Noncardiac Chest Pain May Warrant More Management: Study
10. SGIC Study Finds Drivers Are Losing Their Cool At School
11. Health impacts of mobile phone use to be explored in huge new study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... PawPaws brand pet supplements owned by Whole Health ... the health of felines. The formula is all-natural and is made from Chinese herbs ... Cat Kidney Support Supplement Soft Chews are Astragalus Root Extract and Rehmannia ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Austin residents seeking Mohs ... College of Mohs Surgery and to Dr. Russell Peckham for medical and surgical dermatology. ... treatment for skin cancer. The selective fellowship in Mohs Micrographic Surgery completed by Dr. ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, Dr. Omkar Marathe ... from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained in Internal Medicine ... his fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where he had the ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... A recent article published ... unfamiliar with. The article goes on to state that individuals are now more comfortable ... less common operations such as calf and cheek reduction. The Los Angeles area medical ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , ... June 24, 2016 , ... ... and Scientific Sessions in Dallas that it will receive two significant new grants ... grants came as PHA marked its 25th anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... OAKLAND, N.J. , June 24, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... in the design, development and manufacturing of collagen ... and regeneration announced today that Bill Messer ... Sales and Marketing to further leverage the growing ... surgery medical devices. Bill joins the ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... June 24, 2016   Bay Area Lyme ... Dean Center for Tick Borne Illness , ... Rehabilitation, MIT Hacking Medicine, University of California, Berkeley, ... announced the five finalists of Lyme Innovation ... More than 100 scientists, clinicians, researchers, entrepreneurs, and ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... 24, 2016 Research and ... "Structural Electronics 2015-2025: Applications, Technologies, Forecasts" report ... In-Mold Electronics, Smart Skin, Structural Health Monitoring, ... Structural electronics involves electronic and/or electrical components ... replacing dumb structures such as vehicle bodies or ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: