Navigation Links
Study could help improve gene therapy for heart disease, cancer
Date:10/12/2011

MAYWOOD, Ill. -- A Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine study could lead to improved gene therapies for conditions such as heart disease and cancer as well as more effective vaccines for tuberculosis, malaria and other diseases.

Senior author Christopher Wiethoff, PhD, and colleagues report their findings in the October issue of the Journal of Virology. Editors spotlighted the report as one of the "articles of significant interest." Journal of Virology is the leading journal of the study of viruses.

The study involved a virus that causes the common cold, called adenovirus. Scientists have been trying to use a version of this virus as a delivery vehicle for gene therapies and vaccines. (The virus is not able to reproduce and cause disease.) Administering this virus to patients causes an inflammatory reaction, which can be a double-edged sword: The reaction aids in the use of the virus in vaccines but limits its use for gene therapies.

In gene therapy, one or more desired genes are introduced into the adenovirus, which is then administered to the patient. Once in the body, the virus enters targeted cells and delivers the desired genes. In heart disease patients, for example, the virus delivers genes that trigger the growth of new blood vessels in damaged heart muscle. However, when the adenovirus enters a cell to deliver a desired gene, it causes an inflammatory immune response. In extreme cases, this can endanger the patient. In one highly publicized case, a University of Pennsylvania gene therapy patient named Jesse Gelsinger died from a massive immune response triggered by the use of the adenovirus.

In vaccines, the adenovirus delivers one or more genes. These genes instruct cells to produce a specific protein, which is normally part of the targeted pathogen. This protein, in turn, jump-starts the patient's immune system to attack a specific pathogen, such as the bacterium that causes tuberculosis or the parasite that causes malaria. Here, the inflammatory immune response has the beneficial effect of revving up the immune system to attack germs.

The Loyola study provides new insights into how the adenovirus triggers an immune response. The study involved immune cells from humans and mice. Researchers discovered how cells sense the adenovirus as it enters a cell. This recognition, in turn, triggers the immune response. The finding could help researchers tailor the adenovirus so that it causes less of an immune response in gene therapy applications and an enhanced immune response in vaccines.

"These results will help with future studies of innate immune responses to adenovirus," Wiethoff and colleagues wrote. "Additionally, our understanding of this process could allow us to either enhance or attenuate [weaken] the innate immune response to adenovirus to generate novel vectors for gene therapy and vaccination."


'/>"/>

Contact: Jim Ritter
jritter@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Where Folks Live Plays Role in Health Disparities: Study
2. Many on Medical Guideline Panels Have Conflicts of Interest: Study
3. National study finds vitamin E supplement may increase prostate cancer risk
4. Study Suggests Origins of Pregnancy-Linked High Blood Pressure
5. Lasers Safe for Removal of Pacemaker Wires in Elderly: Study
6. OU professors awarded $2.8 million for 4-year study on biodiversity in warmer climates
7. Direct-to-Consumer Gene Tests Cause Little Anxiety: Study
8. Natural processes can limit spread of arsenic in water, says study
9. Case Western Reserve receives prestigious $5.4 million grant to study esophageal cancer
10. Mayo Clinic wins grant to study ethics of sharing genetic test results with relatives
11. UIC awarded $14 million to study tobacco pricing and media
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... GrassrootsHealth ... incidence rate of type 2 diabetes in the GrassrootsHealth cohort with substantially higher ... make a change in public health,” states Carole Baggerly, Director of GrassrootsHealth, “the ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... Las Vegas, Nevada (PRWEB) , ... February 08, ... ... Co-Founder at RowdMap, Inc., will be speaking on how healthcare companies can use ... project costs, manage the health of a population and intervene and capture the ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... According to research by ... require dental technicians to be certified or obtain continuing education. To increase patient ... “What’s In Your Mouth?” campaign to inform dentists and patients about the possible ...
(Date:2/7/2016)... ... February 07, 2016 , ... ... MyDecision™ empowers employers and organizations with the tools and information to lower the ... elements to cut the cost of providing employee healthcare benefits by as much ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... ... US Sports Camps is proud to sponsor the Bay Area Disc Association's ... leaders, ultimate organizations, and coaches from around the US. The theme for this year’s ... of Youth and Education, describes this year YUCC as “an important conversation we must ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... DURHAM, N.C. , Feb. 8, 2016  Avista ... appointed Eric Setzer as Chief Financial Officer (CFO). ... over twenty years of experience in various roles within ... Avista Pharma, he served as the Executive Director of ... organization in Raleigh, NC . Previously, ...
(Date:2/8/2016)...  HemaFlo Therapeutics, Inc. announced today that the United States ... 9,119,880 covering the use of NephroFlow to treat acute kidney ... founder, said, "We are pleased to secure our rights to ... , PhD, HemaFlo,s founder, said, "We are pleased to secure ... Dale Peterson , PhD, HemaFlo,s founder, said, "We ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... 2016 Palatin Technologies, Inc. (NYSE MKT: ... therapeutics for the treatment of diseases with significant ... that the United States Patent and Trademark Office ... U.S. Patent Application Serial Number 14/313,258 (the ,258 ... treating female sexual dysfunction using the formulation and ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: