Navigation Links
Study brings greater understanding of tumor growth mechanism

A study led by researchers from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry has for the first time revealed how the loss of a particular tumour suppressing protein leads to the abnormal growth of tumours of the brain and nervous system.

The study is published in Brain: A Journal of Neurology.

Tumour suppressors exist in cells to prevent abnormal cell division in our bodies. The loss of a tumour suppressor called Merlin leads to tumours in many cell types within our nervous systems. There are two copies of a tumour suppressor, one on each chromosome that we inherit from our parents. The loss of Merlin can be caused by random loss of both copies in a single cell, causing sporadic tumours, or by inheriting one abnormal copy and losing the second copy throughout our lifetime as is seen in the inherited condition of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2).

With either sporadic loss or inherited NF2, these tumours lacking the Merlin protein develop in the Schwann cells that form the sheaths that surround and electrically insulate neurons. These tumours are called schwannomas, but tumours can also arise in the cells that form the membrane around the brain and spinal cord, and the cells that line the ventricles of the brain.

Although the schwannomas are slow-growing and benign, they are frequent and come in numbers. The sheer number of tumours caused by this gene defect can overwhelm a patient, often leading to hearing loss, disability and eventually death. Patients can suffer from 20 to 30 tumours at any one time, and the condition typically manifests in the teenage years and through into adulthood.

No effective therapy for these tumours exists, other than repeated invasive surgery or radiotherapy aiming at a single tumour at a time and which is unlikely to eradicate the full extent of the tumours.

The Brain study investigated how loss of a protein called Sox10 functions in causing these tumours. Sox10 is known to play a major role in the development of Schwann cells, but this is the first time it has been shown to be involved in the growth of schwannoma tumour cells. By understanding the mechanism, the research team has opened the way for new therapies to be developed that will provide a viable to alternative to surgery or radiotherapy.

The study, undertaken by researchers from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry with colleagues from the State University of New York and Universitat Erlangen-Nurmberg, was led by Professor David Parkinson.

He said: "We have for the first time shown that human schwannoma cells have reduced expression of Sox10 protein and messenger RNA. By identifying this correlation and gaining an understanding of the mechanism of this process, we hope that drug-based therapies may in time be created and introduced that will reduce or negate the need for multiple surgery or radiotherapy."


Contact: Andrew Gould
University of Plymouth

Related medicine news :

1. Sugary Sodas, Fruit Punches May Raise Kidney Stone Risk: Study
2. Sunlamps Used to Lowered Blood Pressure in Highly Publicized Dermatology Study
3. Penn medicine study finds broad support for rationing of some types of cancer care
4. Get Fit in Middle Age to Cut Heart Failure Risk, Study Says
5. Young Women Less Healthy Than Men Before Heart Attack: Study
6. Multiple Head Injuries Raise Soldiers Suicide Risk, Study Finds
7. Yoga May Help Ease High Blood Pressure, Study Finds
8. Springer to collaborate with the Italian Society for the Study of Eating Disorders
9. Comorbidities should be factor in prostate biopsy choice, UCI study finds
10. New Study Reveals that Late Night Food Intake Hinders Weight Loss, Making Weight Loss Supplements Like Prescopodene Helpful With Shedding Excess Pounds
11. Novel study reports marijuana users have better blood sugar control
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... LOS ANGELES, CA (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... MPWH, the No.1 Herpes-only ... age of 30 (see Table 1-1 ). More than 3.7 billion people under ... simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), according to WHO's first global estimates of HSV-1 infection ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... Secura Consultants has prided itself for not only fulfilling the needs of advisers ... solutions at an affordable price and providing top-tier customer service. However, there's always ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... Dr. Thomas Dunlap and ... Dr. Tucker Bierbaum with Emergency Medicine at St., Joseph Health System’s Santa Rosa ... Sepsis conditions present in similar ways and require time-critical intervention to avoid large area ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... 26, 2015 , ... Inevitably when people think Thanksgiving, they also think Holiday ... the Black Friday and Cyber Monday massage chair sales to receive the ... and low to find the best massage chair deals, they can see all of ...
(Date:11/26/2015)... ... ... Jobs in hospital medical laboratories and in the imaging field lead the many ... Medical Group . These fields, as well as travel nursing, ranked at ... through the company’s website, , The leading healthcare staffing agency released ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... Nov. 25, 2015  Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN ) ... (BLA) with the United States ... a biosimilar candidate to Humira ® (adalimumab). Amgen ... submitted to the FDA and represents Amgen,s first BLA ... E. Harper , M.D., executive vice president of Research ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... N.Y. , Nov. 25, 2015  Linden Care, ... and optimizing treatment outcomes for patients suffering from chronic ... request for a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) enjoining Express ... the two companies. --> ... pursuing all of its legal options. ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... On Tuesday, November 24, 2015, the ... Wright Medical Technology, Inc. for product liability and ... implant device, awarded $11 million in favor of ... and three days of deliberations, the jury found ... designed and unreasonably dangerous, and that Wright Medical ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: