Navigation Links
Study brings greater understanding of tumor growth mechanism
Date:5/16/2013

A study led by researchers from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry has for the first time revealed how the loss of a particular tumour suppressing protein leads to the abnormal growth of tumours of the brain and nervous system.

The study is published in Brain: A Journal of Neurology.

Tumour suppressors exist in cells to prevent abnormal cell division in our bodies. The loss of a tumour suppressor called Merlin leads to tumours in many cell types within our nervous systems. There are two copies of a tumour suppressor, one on each chromosome that we inherit from our parents. The loss of Merlin can be caused by random loss of both copies in a single cell, causing sporadic tumours, or by inheriting one abnormal copy and losing the second copy throughout our lifetime as is seen in the inherited condition of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2).

With either sporadic loss or inherited NF2, these tumours lacking the Merlin protein develop in the Schwann cells that form the sheaths that surround and electrically insulate neurons. These tumours are called schwannomas, but tumours can also arise in the cells that form the membrane around the brain and spinal cord, and the cells that line the ventricles of the brain.

Although the schwannomas are slow-growing and benign, they are frequent and come in numbers. The sheer number of tumours caused by this gene defect can overwhelm a patient, often leading to hearing loss, disability and eventually death. Patients can suffer from 20 to 30 tumours at any one time, and the condition typically manifests in the teenage years and through into adulthood.

No effective therapy for these tumours exists, other than repeated invasive surgery or radiotherapy aiming at a single tumour at a time and which is unlikely to eradicate the full extent of the tumours.

The Brain study investigated how loss of a protein called Sox10 functions in causing these tumours. Sox10 is known to play a major role in the development of Schwann cells, but this is the first time it has been shown to be involved in the growth of schwannoma tumour cells. By understanding the mechanism, the research team has opened the way for new therapies to be developed that will provide a viable to alternative to surgery or radiotherapy.

The study, undertaken by researchers from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry with colleagues from the State University of New York and Universitat Erlangen-Nurmberg, was led by Professor David Parkinson.

He said: "We have for the first time shown that human schwannoma cells have reduced expression of Sox10 protein and messenger RNA. By identifying this correlation and gaining an understanding of the mechanism of this process, we hope that drug-based therapies may in time be created and introduced that will reduce or negate the need for multiple surgery or radiotherapy."


'/>"/>

Contact: Andrew Gould
andrew.gould@plymouth.ac.uk
44-018-843-8346
University of Plymouth
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Sugary Sodas, Fruit Punches May Raise Kidney Stone Risk: Study
2. Sunlamps Used to Lowered Blood Pressure in Highly Publicized Dermatology Study
3. Penn medicine study finds broad support for rationing of some types of cancer care
4. Get Fit in Middle Age to Cut Heart Failure Risk, Study Says
5. Young Women Less Healthy Than Men Before Heart Attack: Study
6. Multiple Head Injuries Raise Soldiers Suicide Risk, Study Finds
7. Yoga May Help Ease High Blood Pressure, Study Finds
8. Springer to collaborate with the Italian Society for the Study of Eating Disorders
9. Comorbidities should be factor in prostate biopsy choice, UCI study finds
10. New Study Reveals that Late Night Food Intake Hinders Weight Loss, Making Weight Loss Supplements Like Prescopodene Helpful With Shedding Excess Pounds
11. Novel study reports marijuana users have better blood sugar control
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... ... The Radiology Business Management Association (RBMA) is pleased to announce ... process has been in place since the RBMA was founded in 1968 with all ... Jim Hamilton, MHA, CMM, FRBMA, as president. Dr. Dickerson the chief executive officer for ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... exposed to more adverse experiences than children in the general population. That’s because ... abuse, neglect or other family challenges. While no fault of their own, youth ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... of America (UCAOA) and College of Urgent Care Medicine will host industry leaders ... sessions and speakers will help those in the industry adapt to the issues ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... People are starting to accept ... a hearing aid doesn’t have the stigma it had when great-grandpa wore his hearing ... Greater Boston, in a NALA North American Speaker Series (NASS) segment. “He ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... ... Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at The House of Yahweh in Abilene, Texas, has published a ... does not. Yisrayl says with so many titles and names for the Creator, it’s ... with a little Scripture, backed with a lot of research, the truth is undeniable. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... PLANO, Texas , April 20, 2017  Vivify ... via mobile devices, has been awarded a very significant ... care via EMRs to continual care via digital health. ... of key intellectual property and further secures Vivify,s position ... Vivify, launched in 2009, was the first company to ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... 2017  CVS Pharmacy, the retail division of ... store design to enhance the retail customer experience ... products and expanded beauty selections paired with informational ... new offerings. Together with its innovative digital programs, ... customer experience at CVS Pharmacy.  ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... 20, 2017 NeuroVive Pharmaceutical AB (Nasdaq ... positive preclinical results demonstrating anti-fibrotic effects with ... steatohepatitis (NASH), in an additional well-validated experimental ... has previously shown similar anti-fibrotic effects in ... scientists present novel data demonstrating anti-fibrotic effects ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: