Navigation Links
Study Urges Teens to Cut Down on Salt
Date:11/14/2010

SUNDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who eat less salt lower their long-term risk for high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke, new research indicates.

The finding stems from a computerized projection of what would happen if adolescent boys and girls were to shave off 3 grams of salt from their daily consumption of common processed foods.

"Reducing the amount of salt that is already added to the food that we eat could mean that teenagers live many more years free of hypertension," study lead author Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, an associate professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of California, San Francisco, said in an American Heart Association news release. The findings were to be presented Sunday at the heart association's annual meeting, in Chicago.

"The additional benefit of lowering salt consumption early is that we can hopefully change the expectations of how food should taste, ideally to something slightly less salty," Bibbins-Domingo said.

The study authors noted that in the United States, teens are the main consumers of salt. Their daily ingestion of 9 grams of salt per day is higher than any other age group. At 3,800 milligrams of sodium, that amount is more than double the AHA recommendations for daily consumption (1,500 milligrams).

Approximately 80 percent of salt intake comes from processed and/or prepared foods. More than one-third of that salt is specifically found in cereals, breads, and pastries, while pizza (according to the National Center for Health Statistics) ranks as the nation's king of salt, the study authors said.

A daily 3-gram drop in consumption of the salt typically found in such foods would reduce the incidence of high blood pressure among teens by between 44 percent and 63 percent. And as these teens age, the high blood pressure incidence reductions would persist, dropping between 30 percent to 43 percent among 35- to 50-year olds, according to the study authors' computer modeling.

The analysis also revealed that by the time teens reached the age of 50, such salt reduction would result in a 7 percent to 12 percent drop in heart disease; an 8 percent to 14 percent drop in heart attacks; a 5 percent to 8 percent drop in stroke rates; and a 5 to 9 percent drop in deaths due to all causes.

More information

Visit the American Heart Association for more on the group's salt guidelines.

-- Alan Mozes

SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, Nov. 14, 2010


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Device Improves Survival of Heart Failure Patients: Study
2. Study suggests physicians wait longer for brain recovery after hypothermia Rx in cardiac arrest
3. Sight of Meat Puts People at Ease, Study Suggests
4. Severe Acne May Up Suicide Risk: Study
5. Sleep Apnea May Shrink Brains Gray Matter: Study
6. Painkillers in Pregnancy May Harm Sons Fertility, Study Suggests
7. Hurdles ahead for health care reform primary care model, U-M study shows
8. Study Finds Vitamins E and C Dont Reduce Cataract Risk in Men
9. Math Skills Boost Couples Financial Worth: Study
10. Hospital Checklists Reduce Surgical Complications, Deaths: Study
11. Team colors on cans change perceptions of alcohol risks, MU study finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 05, 2016 , ... Francisco Canales, MD and Heather Furnas, ... Valley office. The technique utilizes the body’s own healing abilities to quickly rejuvenate ... are part of only a select few cosmetic surgeons bringing this procedure to ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... Miami, Florida (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 ... ... largest non-profit organization devoted exclusively to funding innovative lymphoma research and serving the ... services – is poised to once again host, Swirl, A Wine Tasting Event ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... , ... February 05, 2016 , ... Regular gym users ... themselves having to wait longer to access the treadmills. It’s a predictable trend. After ... to lose weight and get in shape by joining gyms, starting new walking or ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... , ... February 05, 2016 , ... At its annual ... Patrick McDermott as Chairman of the National Board of Directors. Mr. McDermott succeeds former ... the Board,” stated Leslie A. Chambers , APDA President and CEO. “Pat has ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... , ... February 05, 2016 , ... Colorize ... on one drop zone to the next using Colorize's dynamic moving camera. Colorize is ... This package includes a 3D slideshow environment with 1 to 5 focus points per ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/5/2016)... Feb. 5, 2016  Aralez Pharmaceuticals Inc. ("Aralez") today ... Inc. ("POZEN") and Tribute Pharmaceuticals Canada Inc. ("Tribute") following approval ... of Tribute. The combined company will operate under Aralez ... operations in Canada , ... . Under the terms of the Agreement and ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... February 5, 2016 --> ... report states that the global active pharmaceuticals ingredients (APIs) ... predicted to reach US$185.9 bn by 2020. It is ... 2014 to 2020. The title of the report is ... by Geography, and by Therapeutic Area) - Global Industry ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... MELVILLE, N.Y. , Feb. 5, 2016  Henry ... of health care products and services to office-based dental, ... has entered into an agreement to acquire a majority ... dental supplies and equipment in Brazil ... Headquartered in Blumenau, Brazil, Dental Cremer is the dental ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: