Navigation Links
Study Tracks Masturbation Trends Among U.S. Teens
Date:8/1/2011

By Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A new nationwide look at data on masturbation among U.S. adolescents finds that boys do it much more often than girls, and they also tend to start earlier.

In addition, masturbation in adolescence appears to be tied to other types of behavior, including both a greater likelihood of engaging in sexual relations with a partner and increased condom use.

The finding is based on an analysis of 2009 data on sexual behavior involving more than 800 teens, aged 14 to 17 years, responding to the National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior (NSSHB).

"Much attention today is given to adolescent sexuality, but few studies have focused on masturbation," noted study lead author Dr. Cynthia L. Robbins, from the section of adolescent medicine in the department of pediatrics at Indiana University in Indianapolis. "Many adolescent boys and girls masturbate, and among sexually active teens masturbation is associated with other sexual behaviors and condom use," she said.

"It is important to recognize that masturbation is an important and normal component of adolescent sexual development," Robbins added.

Her team reported their findings online Aug. 1 in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

With parental permission, the NSSHB survey asked both male and female adolescents (as well as their adult guardians) to recall how often they had masturbated over the prior three months, over the past year, and over the course of their lifetime. Those polled were also asked how often they masturbated alone versus with a sexual partner. Condom use was also noted.

The results: boys were found to masturbate more often than girls, both overall and across all measured time frames.

For example, while nearly three-quarters of boys surveyed reported having ever masturbated, that figure was slightly less than half among girls.

For both sexes, the likelihood of engaging in masturbation appeared to increase with age. Among boys between the ages of 14 and 17 the percentage of those who had masturbated at least once rose from about 63 to 80 percent. Among girls, those figures were lower but still followed an upward slope, rising from about 43 percent to 58 percent across the same time-frame, according to the report.

Yet while boys also were increasingly likely to say they had "recently" masturbated as they got older (rising from 43 percent at the age of 14 to almost 68 percent among 17-year-olds), the same observation was not made among girls.

Boys also engaged in masturbation more frequently than girls: about half of the boys said they engaged in the activity at least twice a week, but that figure fell to about 23 percent among girls. An estimated 46 percent of girls reported masturbating only a few times per year.

In addition, for both boys and girls, engaging in masturbation was associated with a greater odds of engaging in sexual relations with a partner, compared to adolescents who did not masturbate. For boys, masturbation was linked to higher odds of engaging in oral sex and vaginal intercourse, while for girls it was linked to higher odds for oral sex, partnered masturbation, and both vaginal and anal intercourse.

Lastly, the study authors found that condom use was linked to masturbation among those boys (but not girls) who also engaged in vaginal intercourse.

Robbins and her team concluded that "the association of masturbation with other sexual behaviors indicates that masturbation is an important component of adolescent sexuality rather than an isolated or transient phenomenon." In that regard, they urge that teens be educated and reassured that the act is a "normal" part of growing up.

Commenting on the study, Alan Hilfer, director of psychology at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., said he supports the notion that teens should be encouraged to develop a view of masturbation that is free of fear or concern.

"It goes without saying that we should help teens, boys and girls, be comfortable with this. And we should understand while doing this that there is certainly a gender difference, in that girls, for better or worse, are still far more reserved than boys on both the subject and the act," he said.

"And that means, of course, that in terms of the main finding that teenage boys engage in this more than girls, I am absolutely not shocked or surprised," Hilfer added. "I think that testosterone is a big factor among boys. And I think that it's more socially acceptable among their peer group in general to talk about it and engage in it. It is becoming more acceptable among girls. But historically, and still today, it's something that boys do more and earlier."

More information

There's more on this topic at the American Academy of Pediatrics.

SOURCES: Cynthia L. Robbins, M.D., section of adolescent medicine, department of pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis; Alan Hilfer, Ph.D., director, psychology, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, N.Y.; Aug. 1, 2011, Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Despite Treatment, Employees with Depression Generate Higher Absentee Costs, According to Thomson Reuters Study
2. American Council on Exercise (ACE) Study Reveals Kettlebells Provide Powerful Workout in Short Amount of Time
3. TV drama can be more persuasive than news program, study finds
4. Study carried out into biological risks of eating reptiles
5. Neuroimaging study may pave way for effective Alzheimers treatments
6. Study finds racial gaps continue in heart disease awareness
7. Luth Researchs IndicatorEDG(TM) Study Finds Americans Hopes of Achieving Their Dreams Are Fading
8. First blinded study of venous insufficiency prevalence in MS shows promising results
9. Soothing infants with food focus of childhood obesity study
10. People with anxiety disorder less able to regulate response to negative emotions, study shows
11. American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report: Study Finds Racial Gaps Continue in Heart Disease Awareness, Low Knowledge of Heart Attack Warning Signs Among Women
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Study Tracks Masturbation Trends Among U.S. Teens 
(Date:6/28/2017)... , ... June 28, 2017 , ... ... management and financial planning assistance to clients in southern Montana, is announcing a ... by Zoo Montana. , The outreach programs offered by Zoo Montana provide students ...
(Date:6/28/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 28, 2017 , ... ... consulting firm servicing communities throughout the greater Cincinnati metropolitan area, is teaming up ... temporary lodgings for families with children receiving treatment in nearby hospitals. , Ronald ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2017 , ... DrugDev ... study is whether they can trust the sponsor to pay them correctly and on ... sponsors and CROs establish payment strategies that encourage sites to work on their studies. ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projects that the Better Care ... Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), would result in 22 million Americans losing their ... , More than 20 million Americans have gained health insurance under the ACA, and ...
(Date:6/27/2017)... ... , ... A January 18th article on medGadget reports that the ... the year 2024 according to a new report. The article also notes that the ... Los Angeles area clinic Beverly Hills Periodontics & Dental Implant Center says that it ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/19/2017)... HORSHAM, Pa. , June 19, 2017  Researchers ... announced today that they will host a live, complimentary ... Perspectives from the benchtop to the real world" on ... PM EDT. This webinar will feature ... a rare look into the manipulation techniques abusers use ...
(Date:6/14/2017)... The Bio Supply Management Alliance (BSMA) has ... and the Biomedical Manufacturing Network to advance ... California by providing a platform for ... workforce development. The primary focus of this alliance is ... well as small and mid-sized biomedical companies. ...
(Date:6/11/2017)... June 10, 2017  Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: ... Phase 3 studies of galcanezumab, an investigational treatment for ... data on several key secondary endpoints for galcanezumab compared ... these studies (EVOLVE-1, EVOLVE-2 and REGAIN) will be presented ... meeting in Boston . ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: