Navigation Links
Study Suggests Vaccine May Help Kids With Brain Cancer
Date:4/3/2012

TUESDAY, April 3 (HealthDay News) -- A vaccination may help boost the immune system of children with brain tumors, a small new study reports.

The prognosis for many children with brain tumors, known as gliomas, is grim. Radiation is the only effective treatment, although there has been hope that a vaccine could boost the immune system's response.

The results of the new study, which included 27 children and was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, were released Monday at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in Chicago.

"We've found that the vaccine is tolerated well with limited systemic toxicity, but we've also observed that there are some patients who have immunological responses to the vaccine target in the brain that can cause swelling and transient worsening, and subsequently, some of those children can have very favorable responses," study lead author Dr. Ian Pollack said in an AACR news release.

"We've also demonstrated immunological responses in the majority of the kids," added Pollack, who is vice chairman for academic affairs in the department of neurological surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

The study patients included 16 children with newly diagnosed brain stem gliomas, five with newly diagnosed cerebral high-grade gliomas and six with recurrent gliomas.

"These kids, who, for the most part, have intact and very robust immune systems, seem to mount an immune response against the vaccine very effectively at rates that may be even higher than have been noted in studies in adults," Pollack said in the news release.

"This was the first study of its type that examined peptide vaccine therapy for children with brain tumors like this," added Pollack, who is also the chief of pediatric neurosurgery at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh and co-director of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute Brain Tumor Program.

Some of the children experienced what is called "pseudoprogression" after receiving the vaccine, which means that the tumor temporarily grew and the disease symptoms worsened, but the tumor later got smaller and the disease stabilized, the study authors explained in the news release.

"The fact that we've seen tumor shrinkage in children with very high-risk tumors has been extremely encouraging and somewhat surprising," Pollack noted.

Commenting on the study findings, Dr. John Yu, director of surgical neuro-oncology and vice chair of the department of neurosurgery at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said that the impact on the immune systems of the patients is impressive.

"The safe and potentially effective nature of this vaccine would give thousands of patients new hope," Yu said. "Although one cannot glean whether this will improve their overall survival while maintaining a good quality of life, it provides some hope that harnessing the power of the immune system to fight off the brainstem glioma may kill tumor cells and provide a novel means of fighting off their disease."

Because this study was presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

For more about pediatric brain cancer, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

-- Randy Dotinga

SOURCES: John S. Yu, M.D., director of surgical neuro-oncology and vice chair, department of neurosurgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles; April 2, 2012, presentation, American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting, Chicago


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Despite Treatment, Employees with Depression Generate Higher Absentee Costs, According to Thomson Reuters Study
2. American Council on Exercise (ACE) Study Reveals Kettlebells Provide Powerful Workout in Short Amount of Time
3. TV drama can be more persuasive than news program, study finds
4. Study carried out into biological risks of eating reptiles
5. Neuroimaging study may pave way for effective Alzheimers treatments
6. Study finds racial gaps continue in heart disease awareness
7. Luth Researchs IndicatorEDG(TM) Study Finds Americans Hopes of Achieving Their Dreams Are Fading
8. First blinded study of venous insufficiency prevalence in MS shows promising results
9. Soothing infants with food focus of childhood obesity study
10. People with anxiety disorder less able to regulate response to negative emotions, study shows
11. American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report: Study Finds Racial Gaps Continue in Heart Disease Awareness, Low Knowledge of Heart Attack Warning Signs Among Women
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Study Suggests Vaccine May Help Kids With Brain Cancer
(Date:9/3/2020)... ... 2020 , ... The American Medical Spa Association (AmSpa) has ... Saturday, April 10, 2021, at Wynn Las Vegas. The event had previously been ... for non-invasive medical aesthetic practices that brings together owners, physicians, nurse practitioners, physician ...
(Date:9/1/2020)... ... , ... KitoTech Medical, a Seattle-based medical device company, announced ... used to accelerate the commercialization of its microMend® family of wound closure products. ... expand its customer base of healthcare systems as well as independent hospitals and ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... ... August 31, 2020 , ... ... exclusively to funding innovative lymphoma research and serving the lymphoma community through a ... the 10th Anniversary of Blood Cancer Awareness Month (BCAM) and its international ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... ... 31, 2020 , ... Colorado State University Global (CSU Global) ... online education – is proud to announce its new master’s degree in ... kind in the nation, the 60-credit hour program is designed to provide students ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... PASADENA, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... August 31, 2020 ... ... and leadership experience working, both directly with persons with autism and other developmental ... clinical expertise includes early intervention, parent education, adolescents with autism, school consultation, and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/2/2020)... ... September 02, 2020 , ... U.S. Dermatology Partners ... . Dr. Lee will work at Bethesda Dermatopathology Lab. , Jonathan ... from the University of California, Berkley. He went on to receive his M.D. with ...
(Date:9/1/2020)... ... September 01, 2020 , ... While coronavirus cases continue to increase across the ... community organizations remain closed. Because about 80% of blood donations are made at drives ... donors and blood drive hosts to ensure blood products are readily available for patients. ...
(Date:8/31/2020)... ... August 31, 2020 , ... If you live in New York City you will ... part makes sense, it’s the law of supply and demand, but are plastic surgeons in ... a significant percentage of their patients that make the four-hour trip to have expert aesthetic ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: