Navigation Links
Study Shows Cigarette Smoking a Risk Factor for Alzheimer's Disease
Date:1/29/2010

A UCSF analysis of published studies on the relationship between Alzheimer’s disease and smoking indicates that smoking cigarettes is a significant risk factor for the disease. After controlling for study design, quality of the journals, time of publication, and tobacco industry affiliation of the authors, the UCSF research team also found an association between tobacco industry affiliation and the conclusions of individual studies. Industry-affiliated studies indicated that smoking protects against the development of AD, while independent studies showed that smoking increased the risk of developing the disease.

(Vocus) January 29, 2010 -- A UCSF analysis of published studies on the relationship between Alzheimer’s disease and smoking indicates that smoking cigarettes is a significant risk factor for the disease. After controlling for study design, quality of the journals, time of publication, and tobacco industry affiliation of the authors, the UCSF research team also found an association between tobacco industry affiliation and the conclusions of individual studies. Industry-affiliated studies indicated that smoking protects against the development of AD, while independent studies showed that smoking increased the risk of developing the disease.

Study findings were published online today in the January issue (19:2) of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. An abstract of the paper is available at the link below.

“For many years, published studies and popular media have perpetuated the myth that smoking is protective against the development of AD. The disease’s impact on quality of life and health care costs continues to rise. It is therefore critical that we better understand its causes, in particular, the role of cigarette smoking,” said Janine K. Cataldo, PhD, RN, assistant professor in the UCSF School of Nursing and lead author of the study.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, 5.3 million Americans currently have the disease, and that number will escalate rapidly as the baby boom generation ages. AD also triples health care costs for Americans aged 65 and older, the organization states.

The UCSF team reviewed 43 published studies from 1984 to 2007. Authors of one-fourth of the studies had an affiliation with the tobacco industry.

The UCSF team determined that the average risk of a smoker developing AD, based on studies without tobacco industry affiliation, was estimated to be 1.72, meaning that smoking nearly doubled the risk of AD. In contrast, the team found that studies authored by individuals with tobacco industry affiliations, showed a risk factor of .86 (less than one), suggesting that smoking protects against AD. When all studies were considered together, the risk factor for developing AD from smoking was essentially neutral at a statistically insignificant 1.05.

Previous reviews of the association between smoking and AD have not controlled for study design and author affiliation with the tobacco industry, according to Cataldo. To determine if study authors had connections to the tobacco industry, the UCSF team analyzed 877 previously secret tobacco industry documents.

The researchers used an inclusive definition of “tobacco industry affiliation” and examined authors’ current or past funding, employment, paid consultation, and collaboration or co-authorship on a study with someone who had current or previous tobacco industry funding within 10 years of publication.

“We know that industry-sponsored research is more likely to reach conclusions favorable to the sponsor,” said Stanton A. Glantz, PhD, of the UCSF Department of Medicine and a study co-author. “Our findings point to the ongoing corrosive nature of tobacco industry funding and point to the need for academic institutions to decline tobacco industry funding to protect the research process.”

Judith J. Prochaska, PhD, MPH, of the UCSF Department of Psychiatry, also is a co-author. The team’s research was supported by grants from the California Tobacco Related Disease Research Program, the National Cancer Institute, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

UCSF is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care.

Related links:

Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease (January issue, 19:2)
http://iospress.metapress.com/content/x880352113361jk4/?p=a968e063067e47b3b5bdabd977254646=6

Corinna Kaarlela, News Director
Source: Karin Rush-Monroe (415) 476-2557
E-mail: Karin(dot)Rush-Monroe(at)pubaff(dot)ucsf(dot)edu
Web: www.ucsf.edu

# # #

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2010/01/prweb3543444.htm.


'/>"/>
Source: PRWeb
Copyright©2010 Vocus, Inc.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Fat Tissue May Be a Source of Valuable Blood Stem Cells, Study Says
2. More Recruiting of Underrepresented Minorities Needed at U.S. Medical Schools, Study Says
3. Researchers find new way to study how enzymes repair DNA damage
4. Study says lead may be the culprit in ADHD
5. Study examines sexual orientation and bullying among adolescents
6. Fat tissue may be a source of valuable blood stem cells, study says
7. Integrating private insurance with public health would improve US health care -- study
8. Study confirms accuracy of transient elastography in NAFLD
9. New Study: Innovative Technique Allows Male Cancer Survivors Who are Sterile from Treatment to Father Children
10. Saint Thomas Hospital Ranked Top Five Percent in Nation for the Second Consecutive Year According to Quality Study
11. His or hers jealousy? Study offers new explanation for sex differences in jealousy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... Little Rock, AR (PRWEB) , ... October 13, ... ... owned firm with locations throughout Arkansas that offers insurance and financial preparation services, ... to benefit the Rock City Rescue organization. , Rock City Rescue is a ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... , ... October 13, 2017 , ... While it’s often ... a problem. Fortunately, an inventor from Austin, Texas, has identified a solution. , She ... in darkness or restricted lighting. As such, it eliminates the need to turn on ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... The International Association of ... of excellence for the field of eating disorders, announces the opening of early ... in Orlando, Florida at the Omni Resort at ChampionsGate. , The ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... ‘17, and Jennifer Huggins, PharmD ’17, along with clinical associate professor Janice ... of cardiovascular diseases during the 15th Annual Women’s Health Conference. The SIU ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... , ... Apple Rehab Shelton Lakes , which specializes in the delivery ... as part of a disaster drill on October 3rd. , Apple Rehab participated with ... Manager, as well as the Connecticut Long Term Care Mutual Aid Plan (LTC-MAP). ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/28/2017)... Cohen Veterans Bioscience and Early Signal Foundation announce a ... sensors for real-time monitoring of patients with trauma-related and ... focused on disruptive health solutions for rare disorders and ... record and integrate behavioral, cognitive, physiological and contextual data. ... ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... AMSTERDAM , Sept. 25, 2017   ... Trial Master File solutions, today—from the IQPC Trial ... Amsterdam , NL)—announced that EastHORN Clinical Services ... its clinical programs and TMF management. EastHORN, a ... Montrium,s eTMF platform to increase transparency to enable ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... ROCKVILLE, Md. , Sept. 22, 2017  As ... by Republican Senators Bill Cassidy (R-LA) and ... Kalorama Information notes that the medical device industry is ... the medical device tax, the 2.3% excise tax on ... Act.  But they also want covered patients, increased visits ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: