Navigation Links
Study Sheds Light on Genetic Risk of MS
Date:1/5/2011

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Women with multiple sclerosis are more likely than men with the disease to have a gene thought to be connected to the condition, a new study has found.

The finding may help researchers gain more insight into the development of MS, which is becoming more common, at least judged by diagnoses, particularly among women. Although no one knows what causes MS, scientists suspect that some people are genetically susceptible and something in the environment triggers the condition.

The new study examined genes in 1,055 families in which at least one person had MS -- 7,093 people in total.

Among those with MS, women were 1.4 times more likely than men to have a genetic variation in a gene called HLA that has been linked to the disease, according to the report published in the Jan. 5 online edition of Neurology.

"Our findings also show women with the HLA gene variant are more likely to transmit the gene variant to other women in their families than to men," study co-author Dr. George C. Ebers, of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, said in a news release from the American Academy of Neurology.

However, among those most likely to inherit the gene variation, second-degree relatives (such as aunts and their nieces and nephews) are at greater risk than first-degree relatives (such as siblings or parents and children), the investigators found.

"It appears that the less the genetic sharing between individuals, the higher the interaction is between female sex and inheritance of the HLA gene variant," Dr. Orhun Kantarci, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., author of a commentary accompanying the study, explained in the news release. "These findings pave the way for future studies of these genes, hopefully to advance our understanding of inheritance of complex diseases such as MS."

More information

For more about multiple sclerosis, visit the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

-- Randy Dotinga

SOURCE: American Academy of Neurology, news release, Jan. 5, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Vaccine Protects Mice From Cocaines Effects, Study Finds
2. Thermostatic mixer valves could significantly reduce the risk of scalding in children, study finds
3. ICU communication study reveals complexities of family decision-making
4. Chickenpox Vaccine Cuts Hospitalization Rates: Study
5. Stress Can Make a Healthy Cat Sick: Study
6. Study confirms 2 vaccine doses protect children from chickenpox
7. Study Gauges Best Treatments for Chronic Pelvic Pain in Men
8. MSU leads first study of resiliency on the battlefield
9. Clinical decision support systems help control inappropriate medical imaging, study suggests
10. Study finds problems with reviewing medical images from portable media
11. Study shows vitamin D deficiencies may impact onset of autoimmune lung disease
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Study Sheds Light on Genetic Risk of MS
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 13, 2017 , ... The American Board of Family Medicine's (ABFM) Board of ... Executive Officer, succeeding Dr. James C. Puffer upon his retirement. Dr. Newton will serve ... Puffer’s retirement at the end of 2018. Upon assuming the role of President and ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Apple Rehab Shelton Lakes , which ... evacuation of the facility as part of a disaster drill on October 3rd. , ... and Shelton City Emergency Manager, as well as the Connecticut Long Term Care ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and ... explains one of the most popular and least understood books in the Holy Scriptures, ... puzzling descriptions that have baffled scholars for centuries. Many have tossed it off as ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... First ... compliance program management, will showcase a range of technology and learning solutions at ... (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held October 14–18, 2017 at the Mandalay ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... ... The American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) will present the 2017 Morris ... of AMIA’s Annual Symposium in Washington, D.C. AMIA’s Annual Symposium is taking ... in the field of medical informatics, this prestigious award is presented to an individual ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2017)... , Oct. 10, 2017   West Pharmaceutical ... innovative solutions for injectable drug administration, today shared the ... ID Adapter for improving the intradermal administration of polio ... Skin Vaccination Summit in May 2017 by Dr. ... Polio Department, World Health Organization (WHO), and recently published ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... , Oct. 4, 2017 OBP ... self-contained, illuminating medical devices, today announced regulatory approval ... Surveillance Agency (or Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária ... single-use, cordless surgical retractor with integrated LED light ... access, illumination and exposure of a tissue pocket ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... COPENHAGEN, Denmark , Oct. 2, 2017 The ... tool in the struggle to reverse the tide of prescription ... plan for regulating their medicine intake and stepping down their ... is set to launch in December 2017; the first 100,000 ... access. Learn more at http://www.rebound-solution.com/ ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: