Navigation Links
Study Questions Value of Anti-Meth Campaign

Kids seem to be ignoring message that methamphetamine is dangerous

THURSDAY, Dec. 11 (HealthDay News) -- An anti-methamphetamine campaign that utilizes graphic images actually may not be very effective, a new study found.

The Montana Meth Project (MMP), created in 2005, featured images that showed the extreme consequences of using meth "just once." The perceived success of the program had resulted in its implementation in a number of other states.

However, an independent review of the program suggests it's associated with a number of negative outcomes.

The review found that after six months of the MMP's graphic ads: there was a three-fold increase in the percentage of teens who said they believed using meth isn't a risky behavior; teens were four times more likely to strongly approve of regular meth use; teens were more likely to report that taking heroin and cocaine isn't risky; and up to 50 percent of teens said the graphic ads exaggerated the dangers of meth use.

Initially, the MMP was privately funded, but it has since received millions of dollars in state and federal funding because it's promoted as a major success to policy makers and the media. However, the review found that those in charge of the MMP emphasized only positive findings and overlooked the numerous negative results when touting the program.

The program and public funding should be put on hold until further research can determine its effectiveness, said review author David Erceg-Hurn, who's currently completing a Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of Western Australia. He dismissed claims that MPP has reduced meth use in Montana.

"Meth use had been declining for at least six years before the ad campaign commenced, which suggests that factors other than the graphic ads cause reductions in meth use. Another issue is that the launch of the ad campaign coincided with restrictions on the sale of cold and flu medicines commonly used in the production of meth. This means that drug use could be declining due to decreased production of meth, rather than being the result of the ad campaign," Erceg-Hurn said in a Society for Prevention Research news release.

He also attacked the theory underlying the MPP's graphic ad campaign.

"The idea behind the ad campaign is that teenagers take meth because they believe it is socially acceptable, and not risky, and the ads are meant to alter these perceptions. However, this theory is flawed because the Meth Project's own data shows that 98 percent of teenagers strongly disapproved of meth use and 97 percent thought using meth was risky before the campaign started," Erceg-Hurn said.

The study was published in the December issue of the journal Prevention Science.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse has more about methamphetamine.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Society for Prevention Research, news release, Dec. 11, 2008

Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Penn study finds pro-death proteins required to regulate healthy immune function
2. New study shows promise in reducing surgical risks associated with surgical bleeding
3. Study, meta-analysis examine factors associated with death from heatstroke
4. Study suggests loss of 2 types of neurons -- not just 1 -- triggers Parkinsons symptoms
5. Study says COPD testing is not measuring up
6. Preclinical study suggests organ-transplant drug may aid in lupus fight
7. Ability to cope with stress can increase good cholesterol in older white men, study finds
8. High alcohol consumption increases stroke risk, Tulane study says
9. Mailman School of Public Health study examines link between racial discrimination and substance use
10. Pitt study finds inequality in tobacco advertising
11. Stanford study highlights cost-effective method of lowering heart disease risks
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/24/2015)... PA (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... now certified to offer their patients the many benefits of the revolutionary BIOLASE ... the sharp cutting and scraping tools traditionally used by a dentist in ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... Charitable giving ... charitable donations are made in the last five weeks of the year totalling over ... created in 2012 to connect the nation’s charities with those individuals who want to ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... DMG Productions announced that they will ... first quarter 2016 via Discovery Channel. Dates and show times TBA. , Aphria, Inc., ... in the business of producing and supplying medical marijuana pursuant to the Marijuana for ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... The ... waive paid entry and parking fees at several of their most popular properties, ... Great Barrington in support of REI’s Black Friday #OptOutside Campaign. The Trustees encourage ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... N.J. (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... will gather to share their knowledge and experiences at a live taping of ... the Ruesch Center for the Cure of Gastrointestinal Cancers 2015 Symposium at Georgetown ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... --  HeartWare International, Inc . (NASDAQ: HTWR ), ... that are revolutionizing the treatment of advanced heart failure, ... Doug Godshall is scheduled to present at the ... December 1, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. ET.  The conference ... York . .  A ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... F1000Workspace - a research collaboration, reference management ... just six months ago. --> F1000Workspace - ... - since it was launched just six months ago. ... F1000Workspace - a research collaboration, reference management and ... six months ago. --> --> ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... , Nov. 24, 2015 iRhythm Technologies, Inc. ... cardiac care, today announced that it will participate in the 27th ... in New York, NY . Kevin ... on Tuesday December 1, 2015 at 8:50am ET. ... . --> . --> ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: