Navigation Links
Study Offers Insights Into Sensory Perceptions
Date:9/24/2007

Woman who suffered stroke starting experiencing sounds as bodily sensations

MONDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- By studying a woman who experienced sounds as bodily sensations after suffering a small stroke, researchers think they've gained new insight into how the brain processes sensory signals and fixes itself when injured.

The woman began having strange reactions to sound after suffering a stroke that only affected part of a brain structure known as the thalamus. Her experiences provide more evidence that the brain tries to repair itself by making new neural connections after injury, said study lead author Tony Ro, an associate professor of psychology at Rice University.

"It tells us that the brain can continue to reorganize and alter its function very late into life," Ro said.

The thalamus, located in the middle of the brain, acts as a kind of relay station for sensory processing, Ro said. "Almost all of the sensory receptors from the eyes, ears or skin go through into the thalamus before they project onto higher areas of the brain."

About eight years ago, the woman suffered a small stroke that affected only the ventrolateral nucleus, a part of the thalamus that is smaller than a pea, Ro said. She's now about 40 years old and works as a college professor.

The stroke cut off blood circulation "and left a little tiny hole in her brain which was no longer functioning," he said. "About a year to two years after her stroke, she began feeling a lot of odd sensations in the left half of her body when different types of sounds were played."

The study authors then gave a variety of neurological tests to the woman. Some sounds would cause sensations in her left hand, the left side of her face or her left forearm, a phenomenon known as synesthesia, Ro said. Other sounds did nothing.

It appeared that the brain's neurons were reconnecting after the stroke and causing "changes in behavior, sensory processes and perception," Ro said. "Areas of the brain that were primarily involved with feeling on the left half of her body that are no longer receiving input due to brain damage can now respond to different sounds."

The study was expected to be published in an upcoming issue of the journal Annals of Neurology.

Dr. Richard E. Cytowic, a Washington, D.C., neurologist who studies synesthesia, said the study is useful, because the brain scans done by the researchers allowed mapping of cellular connections between the dead area of the woman's brain and other areas of the brain.

And, even though it's just one case, the study "forces rethinking of how the thalamus and brain are organized," Cytowic said. "The areas so often talked about and pointed to on brain diagrams are not so distinct and isolated as conventional illustrations claim."

More information

Learn more about synesthesia from Massachusetts Institute of Technololgy.



SOURCES: Tony Ro, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology, Rice University, Houston; Richard E. Cytowic, M.D., neurologist, Washington D.C.; Annals of Neurology


'/>"/>
Copyright©2007 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Rural Canadians travel far for specialists: study
2. A new study surpasses Gene Therapy Hurdle
3. Tomato Sauce reduces Cancer Risk- Study
4. A question on study of Adult Stem Cell
5. Study on obesity and heart failure
6. National Lung Study in the process
7. Marijuana gateway theory strengthened by study of twins
8. Old theory of adaptation confirmed by new study
9. Study casts doubt on keyboard ills
10. Gene study links endometriosis, infertility
11. Study reveals how stress can make you sick
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... ... To better understand the impact of lung cancer in women, the American Lung ... Today, the Lung Association announced Sharad Goyal, MD , as the recipient of The ... Lung Association’s LUNG FORCE initiative, which raises awareness of the impact of lung cancer ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... IN (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2016 , ... ... benefits advisory organization, is pleased to welcome new Partner Firm Austin & Co., ... personalized, consultative approach to insurance, employee benefits, HR consulting, benefits technology, and beyond. ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... New Brunswick, New Jersey: This ... healthcare needs reach their fullest potential. To commemorate the anniversary, the hospital has themed ... Walk n’ Roll for Children’s Specialized Hospital Foundation on Saturday, May 21, at Johnson ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 24, 2016 , ... ... for physical disease or injury that focuses on repairing the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular ... With an emphasis on functional restoration, NYDNRehab began providing treatments for physical therapy ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... ... May 24, 2016 , ... Growing in popularity, more and more ... products are available and easily accessible. Whether someone chooses to cut gluten out of ... certain diet, King Kullen Grocery stocks their shelves with many different gluten-free products all ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... VMS BioMarketing as senior vice president of sales, announced Andrea Heslin Smiley , ... the company,s business development and sales team, exploring new opportunities for VMS to empower ... ... ... ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , May 24, 2016 ... ™ , la première endoprothèse à ... destinés à l,intervention portant sur les membres ... OrbusNeich, entreprise mondiale spécialisée dans ... changer la vie, a élargi son portefeuille ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , May 24, 2016 ... elkaar verbindt, zodat zij collectief patiënten kunnen behandelen, hun ... is het idee achter de nieuwe en revolutionaire MDLinking ... van de Nederlandse vaatchirurg dr. Hans Flu en oncologisch ... app, die inmiddels beschikbaar is, wordt op dinsdag 24 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: