Navigation Links
Study Finds Millions More May Benefit From Statins
Date:3/19/2009

New prescribing criteria could prevent thousands of heart attacks

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Cholesterol-lowering statins could cut the risk of heart attacks in as many as 6.5 million Americans who have low cholesterol but high levels of a blood marker for inflammation, researchers report.

Statins are known to prevent subsequent heart attacks and strokes in patients who've already suffered one of these cardiovascular events, and the drugs also protect people who haven't had a heart attack or stroke but are at increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease due to factors such as high cholesterol or diabetes.

Based on these guidelines, about 33 million older adults are eligible to take statins, according to background information in a news release about the study.

However, about half of all cardiovascular events occur in people who don't have high cholesterol, and about 20 percent of such events occur in people with no identifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors, noted Dr. Erin D. Michos, an assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and its Heart and Vascular Institute.

A study published last year found statins protect against heart attack and strokes in older adults with low cholesterol but with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a blood marker for inflammation.

To determine how many Americans with low cholesterol (below 130 mg/dl) and high CRP levels would benefit from taking statins, Michos and Hopkins cardiology professor Dr. Roger S. Blumenthal analyzed 1999 to 2004 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

They concluded that 6.5 million older adults with low cholesterol and high CRP might benefit from taking statins. That number would increase to 10 million people if the cholesterol level cutoff was 160 mg/dl, the point at which many doctors decide to prescribe statins.

"We're showing that doctors may be able to prevent thousands of heart attacks, strokes and deaths each year if we expand statin-prescribing criteria to include C-reactive protein levels, something we can assess as part of a simple blood test," Michos said in the Hopkins news release.

Using these new criteria to prescribe statins to older adults could prevent about 260,000 cardiovascular events over five years, the researchers said.

The study was published in the March 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about cholesterol-lowering drugs.



-- Robert Preidt



SOURCE: Johns Hopkins Medicine, news release, March 18, 2009


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Gleevec Prevents Return of Intestinal Cancer, Study Confirms
2. New Clinical Study News for Treatment of Sinusitis - Sinus Infection and Allergy Suffers Now Have a New Effective Form of Relief through Sinus Dynamics
3. Study finds extensive patient sharing among hospitals; could impact spread of infectious diseases
4. Northern California Cancer Center Study Seeks to Improve Colon Cancer Screening in Vietnamese Communities
5. Study finds how brain remembers single events
6. MHA to Release Results of Second Annual Independent Long Term Care Member Study
7. Spinal taps carry higher risks for infants and elderly, study shows
8. Study finds biological clue in brain tumor development
9. Researcher wins $2.6 million grant for depression care study
10. Study gives more proof that intelligence is largely inherited
11. MRSA study suggests strategy shift needed to develop effective therapeutics
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Study Finds Millions More May Benefit From Statins
(Date:4/29/2016)... STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... 5K Run/Walk” at Cove Island Park on Sunday, with sunny skies, a light breeze ... event, raising nearly $33,000. , The 5k Run and Walk and 1-mile ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... surgeon reveals that infants born with severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia have better survival ... born with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH)—a condition where the diaphragm fails to form ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... won the $30,000 Perlman Grand Prize of the 2016 Wharton Business Plan ... the Michelson People’s Choice Award, and the Committee Award for Most ‘Wow Factor,’ ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... New York, NY (PRWEB) , ... April 29, ... ... integrated manufacturer and engineer of patented products, announces the Gyrociser, an exercise invention ... industry is worth $2 billion," says Scott Cooper, CEO and Creative Director of ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... Tarzana, CA (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... Melanoma is the deadliest type ... is to blame for the majority of skin cancer deaths. More than 10,000 people are ... average age at diagnosis is 62, it is the one of the most commonly diagnosed ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/28/2016)... TapImmune,Inc. (TPIV), a clinical-stage ... gene-based immunotherapeutics and vaccines for the treatment of cancer & ... 3rd Annual Growth Capital Expo to be held ... Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, Nevada.  The Company presentation ... th by Dr. John N. Bonfiglio a ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... , le 27 Avril 2016 ... d,affaires a progressé de +5% sur le trimestre, ... récurrentes de consommables  Croissance de +16% ... Mauna Kea Technologies (Euronext : MKEA, ... d,endomicroscopie confocale laser, annonce aujourd,hui son chiffre d,affaires ...
(Date:4/27/2016)...   Zillion Group today announced the ... which specializes in live video consultation. Turning content, ... Zillion enables companies to realize the true potential ... control of their health. Zillion,s ... one-to-one, group and webcast scheduled or on-demand – ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: