Navigation Links
Study: verbal aggression may affect children's behavior
Date:8/4/2008

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - The methods mothers use to control their children during playtime and other daily activities could have a negative impact on their child's self-esteem and behavior, according to a new Purdue University study.

"It's hard to tell parents how to interact with their children based on one study, but what we see here is that parents who have a propensity for being verbally aggressive have a tendency to try to direct and control their children during a play period," said Steven R. Wilson, a professor of communication who specializes in family issues. "As a result, these children were less cooperative, and not only are parents setting up situations that are challenging for them to handle, but they also are subtly undermining their child's self-esteem."

Wilson and Felicia Roberts, an associate professor of communication, are lead authors of a study that appears in the July issue of Human Communication Research journal. The researchers videotaped 40 mothers as they played with one of their children, ages 3-8, during a 10-minute, unstructured play period. The mothers also completed a series of questionnaires to assess their general tendency to be verbally aggressive toward others. For example, someone who is verbally aggressive is likely to insult others as a way to motivate them to comply or behave.

The researchers found that mothers who were high in the general tendency to be verbally aggressive often tried to take control of the play period. For example, the four mothers with the highest verbal aggression scores on average were attempting to direct their child's actions once every 12 seconds, while the four mothers with the lowest verbal aggression scores tried to do so only about half as often. In addition to verbally aggressive mothers telling a child to play with a different toy or to stop playing, they also used negative body language, such as restraining a child by the wrist or shoulder, to reinforce their commands.

"Of course all parents direct their children, and people in general are always directing others to close a door or hand them something," said Roberts, who has a background in linguistics and is a conversational analyst. "It's something we do all the time. But there is a qualitative difference in the kinds of directing going on by these verbally aggressive mothers. By looking at how and when directives occurred, not just how often, we found that moms who scored highest on verbal aggression used directives to control the child and, ultimately, the way the game or activity was played. The aggressive action is not overt, as in a parent hitting or yelling, but these small negative maneuvers can say so much to a child."

Parents interested in learning more about how to improve communication with their children should contact a pediatrician or seek out community family and social service programs, Wilson said.

"We all say things to our children that we regret saying, but saying a lot of things that attack a child's self-confidence is not healthy," Wilson said. "These parents were in an unstructured, low-stress environment, and if we saw this behavior in such a brief setting, how could such negative interactions, even so subtle, affect a child over the long-term? For example, if the parents always have to control what activity they and their children are going to play - as well as for how long and how they are going to play it - you wonder if this communicates to the child that what they want to do doesn't matter."

The researchers will be looking at how praise plays a role in these types of parent-child interactions.


'/>"/>

Contact: Judith Barra Austin
jbaustin@purdue.edu
765-494-2432
Purdue University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. U of M study: Early treatment can reverse heart damage
2. New study: Pine bark reduces perimenopausal symptoms
3. U of M study: Health food supplement may curb addiction of pathological gamblers
4. New study: Pine bark extract reduces ADHD symptoms in children
5. Kaiser Permanente study: Alcohol amount, not type -- wine, beer, liquor -- triggers breast cancer
6. UGA study: Youth exposed to smokeless tobacco ads despite settlement
7. New National Medicaid Study: Minnesota Under Funds Seniors Nursing Home Care $167 Million Annually
8. Study: Modafinil is effective in treating excessive sleepiness
9. Breaking Study: Masimo Pleth Variability Index (PVI) Shown Effective in Noninvasive Detection of Changes in Ventricular Preload and Fluid Volume
10. New study: pine bark extract boosts nitric oxide production
11. Study: HPV test beats Pap in detecting cervical cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/31/2016)... ... 31, 2016 , ... To meet a growing demand for ... The University of Scranton is adding a Certificate in Health Informatics to its ... rapidly growing field of healthcare information. , Healthcare organizations are under growing ...
(Date:5/30/2016)... ... 30, 2016 , ... As the CDC relaxes its stance on traditional No-Nit ... keep their households lice free. , According to a May 26 article from ... kids in the classroom despite the fact that they may be harboring an infestation. ...
(Date:5/30/2016)... ... May 30, 2016 , ... Shaolin Institute officially starts the ... special intensive summer training camp starts on June 17th on Shaolin Institute Atlanta ... children a fun and unique experience with an opportunity to learn KungFu martial ...
(Date:5/29/2016)... ... May 29, 2016 , ... Whole Health Supply is happy to ... KP-240L clipper is available to the public. This is an unusual clipper because it ... the average clipper. , Everything about this product is concentrated on ease of use, ...
(Date:5/28/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 28, 2016 , ... "Color Grading ... drag and drop a preset onto their media," said Christina Austin - CEO of ... Studios, editors can quickly and easily add stylish color grades to their footage. A ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/30/2016)... , May 30, 2016 On ... eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030. At the 69 th ... ever Global Viral Hepatitis Strategy, signalling the greatest global commitment ... a goal of eliminating hepatitis B and C by 2030 ... if reached, will reduce annual deaths by 65% and increase ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... 27, 2016  A new study highlights the necessity of health literacy within the ... the American College of Radiology , a majority of oncology patients undergo imaging screenings ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160527/373022 ... ... Medical Diagnostic Imaging Ampronix ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... 27, 2016 Kitov ... focused on late-stage drug development, today announced the ... of pivotal batches required for registration of KIT-302 ... This follows Kitov,s announcement in December ... met its primary efficacy endpoint. "We ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: