Navigation Links
Study: Most at-risk patients don't adhere to statin treatment, despite real benefits

A new study from North Carolina State University shows that the vast majority of patients at high risk for heart disease or stroke do a poor job of taking statins as prescribed. That's especially unfortunate, because the same study shows that taking statins can significantly increase the quality and length of those patients' lives.

"We found that only 48 percent of patients who have been prescribed statins are taking their prescribed dose on a regular basis after one year and that number dips to approximately 27 percent after 10 years," says Jennifer Mason, a Ph.D. student at NC State and lead author of a paper describing the study. Statins are a component of many current cardiovascular medical treatment guidelines. They lower cholesterol levels and may significantly reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke, particularly in patients that are considered to be at high risk.

The researchers also found that, for high-risk patients, high adherence to a prescribed statin regimen may increase quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) by as much as 1.5 years compared to low adherence and up to two years compared to not taking statins at all. Low adherence means a patient is taking the statins irregularly or at less than the prescribed dosage. QALYs are established metrics for measuring the effect of health conditions, such as heart disease and stroke, on quality of life.

The study used operations research models to look specifically at patients who have type 2 diabetes, because they are at particularly high risk for heart disease, heart attack and stroke.

"These findings suggest that adherence-improving interventions such as patient education or electronic reminders to take medications can significantly improve the quality and length of life, particularly for high-risk patients," says Dr. Brian Denton, co-author of the paper and an associate professor in the Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering at NC State.


Contact: Matt Shipman
North Carolina State University

Related medicine news :

1. Study: Choice between stroke-prevention procedures influenced by patient age
2. UNC study: Obese 3-year-olds show early warning signs for future heart disease
3. New Study: Improved Immune System with Gene-Eden, a Natural Antiviral Supplement that Targets Chronic Viruses
4. Henry Ford Hospital study: Shoulder function not fully restored after surgery
5. Study: Federal funds support health depts., but leadership is key
6. Study: Kidney disease a big risk for younger, low-income minorities
7. Study: Mechanomyography to be accurate in detecting nerves during minimally invasive spine surgery
8. Study: Low Levels of Vitamin D Linked to Higher Rates of Asthma in African American Kids
9. Study: Child health may suffer in strong economy
10. Study: Social influence playing role in surging autism diagnoses
11. Children's Rights Group Agrees with New Study: Infant Circumcision Causes 100 Deaths Each Year in US
Post Your Comments:
(Date:6/26/2016)... , ... June 26, 2016 , ... Brent Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal ... personalized through a fitness app. The fitness app plans to fix the two major problems ... offer a one size fits all type program , They don’t eliminate all ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 ... brings up a new, often overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability to live ... not a common occurrence, but a necessary one in the event that lice have simply ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... athletes and non-athletes recover from injury. Recently, he has implemented orthobiologic procedures as ... City area —Johnson is one of the first doctors to perform the treatment. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Those who have experienced traumatic events ... turn to unhealthy avenues, such as drug or alcohol abuse, as a coping mechanism. ... tools for healthy coping following a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend to feel ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Global law firm Greenberg Traurig, P.A. announced ... attorneys chosen by their peers for this recognition are considered among the top 2 ... received special honors as members of this year’s Legal Elite Hall of Fame: ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/26/2016)... LAS VEGAS , June 26, 2016 ... movement to value-based care operating models within the health ... that enable greater financial efficiency , Deloitte offers ... address the key business issues impacting efficient cost optimization: ... alignment , These services facilitate better outcomes and ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... CAMBRIDGE, Mass. , June 24, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... the Spaulding Rehabilitation Network,s Dean Center for ... of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, MIT Hacking Medicine, ... Center for Innovation, today announced the five finalists ... Hackathon for Lyme disease.  More than 100 scientists, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Dehaier Medical Systems Ltd. (NASDAQ: DHRM ) ... medical devices and wearable sleep respiratory products in ... with Hongyuan Supply Chain Management Co., Ltd. (hereinafter referred ... to develop Dehaier,s new Internet medical technology business. ... Hongyuan Supply Chain,s sales platform to reach Dehaier,s dealers ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: