Navigation Links
Study: Mega Vitamins Won't Help After Heart Attack, Chelation Treatment Might

By E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter

SUNDAY, March 10 (HealthDay News) -- There's mixed news from a much-anticipated clinical trial for people who've suffered a heart attack: While a study found that daily high doses of vitamins and minerals did nothing to improve patient outcomes, there was a hint that controversial "chelation" therapy might.

Still, the lead researcher said he's not ready to recommend chelation therapy, in which doctors give patients high-dose vitamins along with special infusions that seek to leach heavy metals from the body.

"These findings should stimulate further research, but are not by themselves sufficient to recommend the routine use of chelation therapy and high-dose vitamins in most patients," said Dr. Gervasio Lamas, chief of the Columbia University Division of Cardiology at Mount Sinai Medical Center, in Miami Beach, Fla.

The trial, which was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, looked at whether chelation therapy might help patients who'd suffered a heart attack. The findings were presented Sunday at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) annual meeting, in San Francisco.

The expensive treatment, which involves dozens of arduous infusions conducted over a period of years, has been offered by certain clinics for decades but has yet to gain U.S. Food and Drug administration approval for heart patients.

However, its reputation got a boost in November when preliminary results from the same trial were presented at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association. Those results did show a modest benefit from chelation therapy for some patients.

The trial involved more than 1,700 patients from the United States and Canada who had suffered a prior heart attack. Most were already taking standard therapies such as daily aspirin, cholesterol-lowering statins or blood pressure medications.

Because chelation therapy also involves daily high-dose vitamins and minerals, Lamas explained that the new analysis tried to separate out the effects of the supplements from that of the chelation itself.

The patients therefore were randomly selected to receive one of four regimens: high-dose vitamin/mineral supplements plus chelation, vitamins/minerals plus a placebo ("dummy") chelation therapy, chelation with placebo vitamin/minerals, or a placebo/placebo group (no actual therapy given). Chelation therapy consisted of 40 three-hour sessions with the IV infusion spread over 18 months, and the doses of vitamins and minerals given were much higher than recommended daily intakes.

After an average follow-up of more than four years, the researchers found no benefit for people who took the daily high-dose vitamins/minerals alone.

"We cannot recommend high-dose oral vitamins and minerals as adjunct therapy for people who have had [heart attacks]," Lamas said at an ACC press briefing on Sunday.

However, the team did see a slight benefit among the group who took the vitamins/minerals in combination with chelation therapy. Twenty-six percent of people in this group experienced some kind of cardiovascular event such as heart attack, stroke or hospitalization for angina (chest pain) -- less than the 32 percent seen among those who got placebo/placebo therapy only.

Still, the gap was not huge and Lamas, who does not use chelation therapy in his own practice, said he cannot recommend it at this time.

"The message really is a cautious message," he said. "We brought something that has been an alternative medicine treatment into the realm of scientific inquiry and found unexpected results that may merit future research. However, we don't think that the results of any single trial are enough to carry this novel hypothesis into daily use for patients."

Two experts who were not connected to the study were less than impressed by the findings.

"Many Americans think that a multivitamin a day is the cure-all to most ailments," said Dr. Tara Narula, associate director of the Cardiac Care Unit at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. However, "when it comes to heart disease, this appears to be a myth," she said. "There is no evidence that vitamin and mineral supplementation can be beneficial to cardiac patients."

Dr. Sripal Bangalore is assistant professor in the department of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center, in New York City. He agreed with Narula that high-dose vitamins are of no help to heart patients, and added that the finding regarding chelation therapy is an isolated one and "needs to be studied further."

For her part, Narula said that "although it is noteworthy that chelation may be helpful, it is an expensive treatment and does carry significant side effects."

Findings presented at medical meetings are considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

There's more on the care of heart attack patients at the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

SOURCES: Tara Narula, M.D., associate director, Cardiac Care Unit, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Sripal Bangalore, M.D., assistant professor, department of medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York City; March 10, 2013, press briefing, American College of Cardiology annual meeting, San Francisco, with Gervasio Lamas, M.D., chief, Columbia University Division of Cardiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Fla.

Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Study: Diabetic medication may protect patients from developing heart failure
2. Doctors Health Press Reports on German Study: Only 20% of Patients Get Colonoscopies, Important in Preventing and Diagnosing Colon Cancer
3. Bel Marra Health Reports on a New Study: Parents are Much More Likely to Experience Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety
4. Study: HPV Genital Warts is Most Common Sexually Transmitted Infection in U.S. Military, polyDNA Recommends Gene-Eden-VIR Against the HPV Infection
5. Study: Computerized reminders significantly improve HIV care in resource-limited setting
6. New gender benchmarking study: Brazil succeeding in providing a positive STI environment for women
7. Bel Marra Health Reports on a New Study: Software Originally Used for Star Gazing Now Being Used to Analyze Breast Cancer Tissue
8. Study: Same-sex cohabitors less healthy than those in heterosexual marriages
9. Doctors Health Press Reports on Study: Heart-Healthy Linoleic Acid Levels Decrease with Age
10. Study: Electronic Prescribing Cuts Medication Errors
11. Regenstrief study: Informatics tools underutilized in prevention of hospital-acquired infection
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Study: Mega Vitamins Won't Help After Heart Attack, Chelation Treatment Might
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Brillouin Energy Corp. Congress and Government officials ... renewable energy technologies capable of producing commercially useful amounts of thermal energy (heat) ... and HHT™ Boiler System reactor core modules were presented to Congress on Capitol ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... ... American Family Care (AFC), the nation’s leading provider of urgent care and ... Metro Atlanta’s North Point Mall. The clinic is designed to test the concept of ... to operate through Dec. 24. , Holiday Pop-Up Clinic , Official Opening November 27, ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... been designated an Aetna Institute of Quality® Bariatric Surgery Facility for treating individuals ... and cost of health care services available to its members to help them ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... 24, 2015 , ... Bibliomotion is thrilled to announce the launch ... and Diversity by Nancy M. Schlichting, Chief Executive Officer of Henry Ford ... address the needs of patients and their families, shaped my desire to improve the ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... ... Robert Yeager CEO of PharmMD, has announced the release of ... been multiple breakthroughs and challenges as healthcare reform moves out of its infancy and ... partners to stay ahead of the curve by breaking down barriers for every patient, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... Nov. 24, 2015 Teledyne DALSA , a ... sensing technology, will introduce its CMOS X-Ray detector for ... November 29 to December 3, at McCormick Place in ... for diagnostic and interventional imaging will be on display in ... of advanced CMOS X-Ray detectors is the industry benchmark ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... Pa. , Nov. 24, 2015  NuShield, Inc., an industry leader in LCD screen protection ... and stationary computer technology as part of their patient monitoring or electronic documentation system. ... ... ... A ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... 2015  BioPlast Manufacturing, a manufacturer of plastic ... diagnostic and biotech environments, announced today that it ... petri dishes. This acquisition is aligned with BioPlast ... products that are designed and tested by scientists ... Bristol, Pennsylvania ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: