Navigation Links
Study: Doctors Significantly Less Likely to Provide Women with Treatments to Prevent Heart Attacks

WomenHeart: Study Should Be 'Wake-Up Call' for Doctors and Women

WASHINGTON, May 19 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new study has found that women with coronary artery disease are significantly less likely than men to be treated with medications to prevent heart attacks.

That's why WomenHeart - the national coalition for women with heart disease -- is calling on doctors to take extra precautions to make sure that women are getting the care that they need.

"This study should serve as a wake-up call to doctors and women alike," said Lisa Tate, WomenHeart CEO. "Heart disease is the leading cause of death of American women. Clearly, too women are not getting the medical care that they need."

The study, published this month in the journal Heart, was based on data from 25,755 men and women who had a heart attack or chest pain between 1999 and 2006. All of the patients had an angiogram to check for blockages in their heart's blood vessels.

Among heart patients, women were significantly less likely than men to receive medications called beta blockers, statins and ACE inhibitors - which experts say are crucial to preventing further heart problems, the study's authors said. Female patients also were less likely to get treatments to open their blood vessels.

According to the study, women with more advanced coronary artery disease were more likely than men to have died, or to have suffered another heart attack or stroke within six months of their initial hospitalization.

The study also found that women were twice as likely as men to have "normal" or "mild" results on an exam of their heart's blood vessels. This was despite the fact that other tests confirmed that the women were having a heart attack or unstable angina.

Part of the problem is that atherosclerosis -- a progressive buildup of fatty deposits or plaque in the body's arteries - can get worse over time without a person experiencing any symptoms. That's why it's critically important that women get regular check-ups and talk with their doctors about preventing heart disease.

The study's authors note that many patients and doctors don't view coronary artery disease for what it is: a problem that must be prevented through lifestyle changes as well as medications and, for emergency cases, treatments such as angioplasty.

As noted by the study's authors: The best way to prevent heart problems is through improvements in diet and exercise habits, quitting smoking, controlling blood pressure and blood sugar, and using medication when needed.

"Heart disease is the leading cause of death of American women and kills 32 percent of them," said Tate. "In fact, 267,000 women die every year from heart attacks -- more than six times as many women as breast cancer. It's time we all took action to reduce these tragic numbers."

To learn more about preventing women's heart disease, visit

To learn more about atherosclerosis, visit

About WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease

WomenHeart is the only national organization dedicated to advancing women's heart health through advocacy, community education and patient support. As the leading voice for the 44 million American women living with or at risk of heart disease, WomenHeart advocates for equal access to quality care and champions prevention and early detection, accurate diagnosis and proper treatment of women's heart disease. A nonprofit, 501(c)(3) patient advocacy organization, WomenHeart is both a coalition and community of more than 16,000 members nationwide, including women heart patients and their families, health care providers, advocates and consumers committed to helping women live longer, healthier lives.

SOURCE WomenHeart
Copyright©2008 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. New Study: Texas Seniors 4th Hardest-Hit from Proposed Bush Administration Medicare Cuts
2. Study: Most female child molesters were victims of sexual abuse
3. Study: Kids think eyeglasses make other kids look smart
4. U of M study: Online intervention paramount for reducing HIV in high-risk population
5. Study: Casual Video Games Demonstrate Ability to Relieve Stress, Improve Mood: Potential Clinical Significance Highlighted
6. Study: Counseling trauma victims causes secondary trauma
7. RIT study: Sign language interpreters at high ergonomic risk
8. U-M study: Work hassles hamper sleep
9. Study: Health shocks diminish wealth more later in life
10. Study: Treating post-traumatic stress first helps children overcome grief
11. Geisinger study: Use of digital health records improve health of the elderly
Post Your Comments:
(Date:12/1/2015)... York, NY (PRWEB) , ... December 01, 2015 ... ... epidemic in the 1980s we have seen vast improvements in scientific research and ... made significant strides, providing increased hope and relief to those affected by HIV/AIDS. ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... The workstation boundaries for imaging ... Information Systems launches MED-TAB™ -- the world’s first portable DICOM-calibrated medical image display, ... to December 4, 2015. , MED-TAB is expected to change teleradiology because ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... For many X-rays taken at ... accurate interpretation by the radiologist. The marking utensils are so small, however, they ... found a way to alleviate this problem. , He developed the patent-pending MARK ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... , ... December 01, 2015 , ... ... of Excellence (BHCOE) today announced that the organization has awarded Education and Developmental ... with a Distinguished Award. The award celebrates exceptional special needs providers that excel ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Lutronic, a leading innovator of aesthetic and medical laser and ... for sale in the United States. Clarity is a Superior Dual Wavelength Platform ... into a single platform that is easy to own and operate. , For ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/1/2015)... , Dec. 1, 2015 ... today announced that its Chief Executive Officer, ... the Oppenheimer Annual Healthcare Conference in New ... in the conference through a webcast on ... , --> ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... India and PITTSBURGH , ... today announced that it expects to be the first ... markets funded by international donors, TLE400 (Tenofovir Disoproxyl Fumarate ... mg) for $99 per patient, per year. Mylan partnered ... TLE400. The significantly reduced price could generate savings of ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... Breg, Inc ., a premier provider ... it has been awarded three contracts by Novation, a ... will have access to improved pricing for Breg,s portfolio ... goods dedicated to advancing orthopedic care.  ... population, rising prevalence of chronic conditions and the health ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: