Navigation Links
Study: Chest CT Scans May Increase Breast Cancer Risk
Date:11/27/2012

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Use of medical imaging has surged in the past decade, and now a new study suggests the trend carries a risk: Having multiple cardiac and chest CT scans may increase the chances of breast cancer, researchers report.

The risk appears higher for younger women, the preliminary research showed. For example, for a girl or young woman under age 23 who has two high-dose cardiac or chest CT scans, the risk of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years doubles, the researchers found.

"There's a sense that medical imaging is a panacea, but women need to know that there is a trade-off with these exams," said study senior author Rebecca Smith-Bindman, a professor of radiology and biomedical imaging epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco. "If the exam is necessary, the risk is small but almost always worth it. If the test isn't necessary, it's something to avoid."

Still, a woman's overall risk is low, she said. The actual rate for young women who have had two scans is about eight cases of breast cancer per 100,000 women, up from four cases per 100,000, Smith-Bindman said.

The study, scheduled for presentation Tuesday at the Radiology Society of North America annual meeting in Chicago, included data on radiation exposure from the Group Health insurance database. The researchers reviewed CT scan-dose data on more than 1,600 females between 2000 and 2010, and used a statistical modeling technique to estimate the average radiation doses they received.

The researchers found that the use of CT scans increased over time. In 2000, there were about 100 scans per 1,000 women enrolled. By 2010, that number had reached 192 per 1,000 women. Almost half of the scans in 2010 exposed the chest to radiation. The dose of radiation varied by test, with higher doses delivered during scans of the heart or chest.

Nuclear medicine examinations may also contribute to breast cancer risk, the study found. Although the number of nuclear-imaging scans -- scans that use a small amount of a radioactive compound -- decreased over the 10-year period, about 84 percent of those performed in 2010 exposed the chest to radiation, according to the study.

Because breast tissue is so sensitive to radiation exposure, imaging providers should pay attention to radiation doses and use dose-reduction software wherever possible, Smith-Bindman and her colleagues said.

Richard Morin, professor of radiologic physics at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., agreed that limiting unnecessary CT scans and radiation exposure is critical.

"As long as the exam is appropriate, the benefit to the patient far outweighs the radiation risk for that patient," said Morin, who was not involved in the study.

"We don't want to scare patients," he added. "The risk of breast cancer in this group is very low to begin with. I would hate to find out that someone didn't have an exam done because they were worried about a potential risk, and then we didn't find a disease."

Morin added that it's important to note that the study authors used statistical modeling, rather than actual radiation-dose information, and that most centers today expose patients to less radiation than they did 10 years ago. "It's difficult to take estimated doses and apply it to risk," Morin said.

Another study to be presented at the meeting had some good news about mammography: The amount of radiation that travels to surrounding areas (called scatter radiation) such as the thyroid and salivary glands, the lens of the eye, the sternum or the uterus, is very low.

"Scatter radiation from screening mammography is minimal, resulting in negligible risk to the patient," wrote the study authors, from Penn State Hershey Medical Center.

"Use of thyroid shields [to protect the thyroid gland during a mammogram] to reduce risk even further is not recommended," the authors said. Thyroid shields can impair mammographic quality, they noted.

The study included 100 women who wore special devices to measure the amount of scatter radiation on other areas of the body.

Data and conclusions presented at medical meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

More information

Learn more about radiation exposure from the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

SOURCES: Rebecca Smith-Bindman, M.D., professor, radiology and biomedical imaging epidemiology and biostatistics, obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences, and director, Radiology Outcomes Research Lab, University of California, San Francisco; Richard Morin, Ph.D., Brooks-Hollern professor of medicine, professor, radiologic physics, and medical physicist, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla.; Nov. 27, 2012, presentations, Radiological Society of North America annual meeting, Chicago


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Neuroimaging study: Negative messages less effective on those who are substance dependent
2. University of Tennessee study: Unexpected microbes fighting harmful greenhouse gas
3. Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis Plus Depression May Be Deadly
4. Study: Allergies Need to Be Taken Seriously
5. Diabetes study: Mindful eating equals traditional education in lowering weight and blood sugar
6. Study: Education levels in Asian American neighborhoods affect residents health
7. Study: Metformin offers cardio benefits over sulfonylureas in diabetes
8. Study: New tool helps doctors predict heart attack patients at risk for repeat hospitalization
9. Study: Alcohol, drug abuse counselors dont always require total abstinence
10. Study: Repeated surgeries appear to extend life of patients with deadliest of brain cancers
11. Study: Use of antipsychotic drugs improves life expectancy for individuals with schizophrenia
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Study: Chest CT Scans May Increase Breast Cancer Risk
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... "FCPX editors can now reveal ... Final Cut Pro X," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. ... Cut Pro X users can now reveal the media of their split screens ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... , ... June 27, 2016 , ... Quality metrics are ... in many ways they remain in the eye of the beholder, according to experts ... publication of The American Journal of Managed Care. For the full issue, click ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... Michigan (PRWEB) , ... June 26, 2016 , ... ... to fertility once they have been diagnosed with endometriosis. These women need a ... they also require a comprehensive approach that can help for preservation of fertility ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 2016 , ... First Choice Emergency Room , the largest network of ... Medical Director of its new Mesquite-Samuell Farm facility. , “We are pleased to ... said Dr. James M. Muzzarelli, Executive Medical Director of First Choice Emergency Room. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... A recent article published June ... with. The article goes on to state that individuals are now more comfortable seeking ... common operations such as calf and cheek reduction. The Los Angeles area medical group, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/26/2016)... Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc (Nasdaq: JAZZ ... Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976, as amended ("HSR"), with ... ("Celator"; Nasdaq: CPXX ) expired effective June ... As previously announced on May 31, 2016, Jazz ... under which Jazz Pharmaceuticals has commenced a tender offer ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... June 24, 2016  Global Blood Therapeutics, Inc. (GBT) ... developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of grievous ... the closing of its previously announced underwritten public ... the public offering price of $18.75 per share. ... offered by GBT. GBT estimates net proceeds from ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 Dehaier Medical ... the "Company"), which develops, markets and sells medical devices ... , signed a strategic cooperation agreement with Hongyuan ... "Hongyuan Supply Chain") on June 20, 2016, to develop ... the strategic cooperation agreement, Dehaier will leverage Hongyuan Supply ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: