Navigation Links
Studies do not support unhealthful relation between animal foods and breast cancer
Date:8/14/2009

Breast cancer is the 7th leading cause of mortality in the United States and results in approximately 41,000 deaths each year. Although genetic factors are important, there is considerable evidence that breast cancer risk is related to modifiable lifestyle factors, such as physical activity, body weight, alcohol intake, and dietary choices. The September 2009 issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reports the results of 3 human studies designed to better delineate the relation between animal foods and breast cancer risk.

"These studies highlight two very important points," said American Society for Nutrition Spokesperson Shelley McGuire, PhD. "First we all need to remember that there are really no such things as 'bad' foods. Second, observational studies that show associations between diet and health need to be considered with a proverbial grain of salt. These studies clearly provide additional and strong evidence that consumption of meat and dairy products by women does not, by itself, increase breast cancer risk. Further, moderate and mindful consumption of these foods can be very important in attaining optimal nutrition for most women who often do not consume sufficient iron and calcium."

In the first study, which was a controlled dietary intervention trial conducted in the United States, 35 obese postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes received conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplements or a control supplement (safflower oil) each for 36 wk; adiposity was assessed. In another study, researchers examined the association between CLA intake from natural sources and breast cancer incidence in a large cohort of initially cancer-free Swedish women for 17.4 y. The third study assessed whether the consumption of meat, eggs, and dairy products was associated with breast cancer risk in a very large group of healthy European women followed for 8.8 y.

These studies provide no evidence that animal-food consumption increases (or decreases) risk of breast cancer, although CLA supplementation may decrease adiposity (a major risk factor for this disease). In an editorial, Linos and Willett remind us that these studies did not assess the relation between animal-food intake during early life and later breast cancer, a likely important piece of the puzzle. Nonetheless, they conclude, "These data are sufficient to exclude any major effect of consuming these foods during midlife or later on risk of breast cancer." Perhaps we finally have the answer to this long-standing question.


'/>"/>

Contact: Suzanne Price
sprice@nutrition.org
American Society for Nutrition
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Star Scientific Files Second Quarter Financial Results; Rock Creek Pharmaceuticals Reports Early Promising Results in Studies Assessing Safety and Viability of Active Components for a Non-Nicotine Nutraceutical (CigRx(TM))
2. Arizona Pain Specialists Contend Recent Vertebroplasty Studies are Misleading: Studies Actually Show it is Effective at Reducing Pain
3. Not-For-Profit Nursing Homes Fare Better in Studies
4. Put Defibrillators in High-Traffic Spots, Studies Urge
5. Rush University Medical Center studies program to help older adults transition from hospital to home
6. Stent Studies Tied to Rapid Changes in Use
7. Lilly to Unveil More Than 30 Studies at Premier Lung Cancer Meeting
8. SpeechEasy Seeks Proposals For Future Research Studies
9. Leukemia cells evade immune system by mimicking normal cells, Stanford studies show
10. Studies Affirm Value of Healthy Lifestyle
11. Studies Show Genetic Activity of Antioxidants
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/13/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Hidden Cypress in Sun City is the place to be on March 3rd ... Frederick Weniger will be hosting this educational seminar from 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. ... special pricing on offers. In addition, prizes will be given away and light refreshments will ...
(Date:2/13/2016)... ... ... individuals looking to lead a healthy lifestyle have decreased carbohydrate consumption and increased their ... delved into this niche allowing those giving up their beloved pasta a chance to ... of protein and only 7 grams of carbohydrates per 50 gram serving--a ratio that ...
(Date:2/13/2016)... Tennessee (PRWEB) , ... February 13, 2016 , ... ... the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) states that vein visualization technology should be used ... by healthcare facilities around the world, the INS Standards mandate the use of ...
(Date:2/13/2016)... ... , ... In the early or “honeymoon” stage of a relationship, couples strive ... their way to be romantic, and may exaggerate a strength or two in an ... profile. , A recent study from Queendom.com , however, suggests that new ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... Antonio, TX (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... ... love, as expressed in Blue SKies Buddha, the biography of Rama - Dr. Frederick ... fact a love story, the love of a Buddhist teacher for teaching and helping ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... IRVINE, Calif., Feb. 11, 2016 PRO-DEX, INC. (NasdaqCM: ... quarter ended December 31, 2015. The Company also filed its ... fiscal year 2016 with the Securities and Exchange Commission today. ... December 31, 2015 --> --> ... 2015 increased $2.6 million, or 95%, to $5.4 million from ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , Feb. 11, 2016   Health 2.0 , ... new health technologies, announced today " 10 Year Global ... health tech over the past ten years.   ... a decade, Health 2.0 has served as the preeminent ... connected with thousands of technologies, companies, innovators, and patient-activists ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , Feb. 11, 2016  AfterPill.com is reporting that ... alcohol abstinence for all women who are at risk ... U.S. each year and raises the risks of unprotected ... --> According to the Guttmacher Institute, there ... women of child-bearing age, who have sex without the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: