Navigation Links
Stroke more prevalent in United States than in Europe
Date:2/22/2008

American adults have a higher prevalence of stroke than their European counterparts, due in part to a higher rate of stroke risk factors among Americans and barriers to care in the United States, according to a study presented at the American Stroke Associations International Stroke Conference 2008.

Compared to European men, U.S. men had 61 percent higher odds of having a stroke and U.S. women had almost twice the odds of stroke as European women.

Most of this gap is among relatively poor Americans who were, in our data, much more likely to have a stroke than poor Europeans, whereas the gap in stroke prevalence is less marked between rich Americans and rich Europeans, said Mauricio Avendano, Ph.D., author of the study.

The study is based on 2004 data from the U.S. Health and Retirement Survey (HRS); the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE); and the English Longitudinal study of Aging (ELSA). These surveys include biennial interviews among people age 50 years and older.

The strength of these surveys is that the questionnaires were explicitly designed to be fully comparable across all countries, and the samples were drawn to be representative of the entire population in each country, said Avendano. a research fellow in public health at the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, The Netherlands

The limitation is that were dealing with self-reports of a doctors diagnosis of stroke, not the diagnostic data itself.

Researchers studied data on 13,667 people in the United States and 30,120 individuals in 11 European countries. The analysis included stroke occurrence, socioeconomic status, and major risk factors for stroke including obesity, diabetes, smoking, physical activity and alcohol consumption, which can differ largely across countries.

Overall, women were about one-quarter less likely to have a stroke, on average, than men.

Many risk factors for stroke, including blood pressure and smoking, have generally increased among women but remained stable among men, Avendano said. This may explain why the gap in stroke prevalence between men and women is less marked than before. In fact, in some age groups and populations such as France, women may have higher prevalence of stroke than men.

The age-adjusted prevalence rate of stroke varied considerably across countries. It was highest in the United States and lowest in the southern Mediterranean European countries of Spain, Italy and Greece, as well as Switzerland.

The higher prevalence of stroke in the United States and the lower stroke prevalence in Mediterranean populations may be due in part to cross-country differences in risk factors and to barriers to care in the United States.

Southern Mediterranean countries have a diet rich in vegetables, fruits and fish and lower in fats, which partly explains why heart disease is so much lower in these populations than in northern Europe and the United States, Avendano said.

However, for stroke, the picture is more complicated. For instance, although Italy has relatively low stroke prevalence, former studies indicate that Italians have a similar or higher stroke incidence rate than people in other European countries or the United States. Thus, the results on prevalence may also reflect poor stroke survival in Italy, which will result in a lower prevalence of stroke.

Prevalence is an a estimate of the total number of cases of a disease existing in a population during a specified period. While incidence is an estimate of the number of new cases of a disease that develop in a population, usually in a 1-year period.

Higher stroke prevalence was associated with lower socioeconomic status as measured by wealth, income and education, but these associations were stronger in the United States than in most European countries.

Beyond the contribution of specific risk factors, policies that differ dramatically between Europe and the United States may play a role, Avendano said. This includes healthcare access, which is universal in Europe but not in the United States, and the preventive orientation of some European systems aimed at tackling stroke risk factors, as opposed to the U.S. healthcare system, which focuses more on treatment and may actually be more successful in keeping stroke cases alive.

Furthermore, policies related to nutrition and transportation for example may make Americans more prone to less physical activity and less healthy diets than their counterparts in many European countries, he said.

Risk factors alone do not account for the differences we found, which points to the role of broader healthcare and structural policies, he said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Bridgette McNeill
bridgette.mcneill@heart.org
504-670-7908
American Heart Association
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Moderate Aerobic Fitness Levels May Cut Stroke Risk
2. Fish Oil Flounders, But Fiber Might Lower Stroke Risk
3. Daytime Dozing Might Raise Stroke Risk
4. New Stroke Treatments Reduce Brain Damage, Improve Recovery
5. Mammograms Might Spot Stroke Risk
6. In-Hospital Stroke Deaths Rise on Nights, Weekends
7. Music Therapy Improves Stroke Outcomes
8. Middle-Aged Women Gaining Weight, Raising Their Stroke Risk
9. Logistical information for the 2008 International Stroke Conference
10. Stem Cells Repair Stroke Damage in Rats
11. ASA International Stroke Conference 2008
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... Hair ... new member survey conducted by the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery ... to 2016 rose 60 percent, with 635,189 procedures performed in 2016. , ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... September 21, 2017 , ... ... eat right or exercise more try taking a more holistic approach and use ... Aweganic’s new Amazon essential oil collection is certified USDA guaranteeing that, the new ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Preora Diagnostics Inc. , a privately ... received two prestigious recognitions that acknowledge the promise of its PWS Nanoctyology platform ... been named a Top 100 Finalist for the 16th annual Chicago Innovation Awards ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... FlipBelt, the fitness brand ... to detail to the athletic wear market with the launch of their FlipBelt Crops. ... have their essentials securely at their fingertips while at the gym, on the trail, ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... ... September 21, 2017 , ... In ... and Clark College Emeritus Professor of Education Gregory A. Smith examines student privacy ... Asleep at the Switch: Schoolhouse Commercialism, Privacy, and the Failure of Policymaking . ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/5/2017)... , Sept. 5, 2017 Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc. ... ), a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company focused on the development ... has successfully concluded its meeting with the U.S. Food ... oral insulin formulation. ... the regulatory pathway for submission of ORMD-0801, would be ...
(Date:9/1/2017)... 1, 2017  Explorers Like Us ( https://explorerslikeus.com/ ) is ... experiences — and deliver these experiences as part of Life ... feel and heal better. ... While nothing beats a walk, jog or simply ... Life Environments™ is the next best thing when getting there ...
(Date:8/31/2017)... NEW YORK , Aug. 31, 2017 ... the industry,s must-read guide to the latest innovations happening ... the first industry publication to focus on providing a ... advancements. Ultimately, the issue covers the most innovative companies, ... year. "Everyone in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: