Navigation Links
Stress triggers tumor formation, Yale researchers find
Date:1/13/2010

This release is available in Chinese.

Stress induces signals that cause cells to develop into tumors, Yale researchers have discovered. The research, published online Jan. 13 in the journal Nature, describes a novel way cancer takes hold in the body and suggests new ways to attack the deadly disease.

Until now, most researchers believed that more than one cancer-causing mutation needed to take place in a single cell in order for tumors to grow. The Yale team, led by Tian Xu, professor and vice chairman of genetics and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, illustrated that cancer-causing mutations can cooperate to promote tumor development even when they are located in different cells within a tissue.

"The bad news is that it is much easier for a tissue to accumulate mutations in different cells than in the same cell," said Tian, who also is a researcher with the Yale Cancer Center and the Fudan-Yale Center for Biomedical Research at Fudan University in China.

The Yale team worked with fruit flies to study the activity of two genes known to be involved in development of human cancers: a gene called RAS that has been implicated in 30 percent of cancers, and a tumor-suppressing gene called scribble, which contributes to tumor development when mutated. Neither a mutated RAS nor the defective scribble alone can cause cancer. Researchers in the Xu lab previously showed that a combination of the two within the same cell could trigger malignant tumors.

However, the Yale team found that these mutations did not have to co-exist in the same cell to cause tumors. A cell with only mutant RAS can develop into a malignant tumor if helped by a nearby cell with defective scribble. They also found stress conditions such as a wound could trigger cancer formation. For instance, RAS cells developed into tumors when a wound was induced in the tissue. The culprit underlying both phenomena turned out to be a signaling process called JNK, which is activated by environmental stress conditions.

"A lot of different conditions can trigger stress signaling: physical stress, emotional stress, infections, inflammation all these things. Another bad news for cancer" Xu said.

While the paper shows it is easier than previously thought for cancer to take root in the body, it also identifies new targets to prevent and treat one of the deadliest diseases in the developed world. The Yale team found that the JNK stress signaling travels from one cell to the next, but that the propagation can be blocked.

"Better understanding of the underlying mechanism causing cancer always offers new tools to battle the disease," Xu said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Bill Hathaway
william.hathaway@yale.edu
203-432-1322
Yale University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Stress on Cells Can Turn Them Cancerous
2. Men, Women Respond to Stress Differently
3. Study Finds More Than One Third of Parents Experience Traumatic Stress One Month After Childs Injury
4. As Swine Flu Ebbs, Officials Stress Importance of Vaccine
5. Quitline messages that stress benefits of quitting may improve smoking cessation
6. Dont Invite Holiday Stress Into Your Home
7. Prescription Audio Gives the Gift of Stress Relief This Holiday Season
8. Dancing in the Eye of the Hurricane: How to Stop Running from Stress…and Start Asking It to Dance
9. Stress From Prostate Cancer Diagnosis May Be Fatal
10. How to Attack Holiday Stress Head-On
11. The Breema Center Presents a Yearlong Campaign to Transform Stress into Harmony in 2010 and Beyond
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/1/2016)... Mission Viejo, CA (PRWEB) , ... May 01, 2016 , ... ... plan for those in need of chiropractic help. The agency offers a verity of ... and any chiropractic need. According to Chris Nelson at the firm, “Many insurance plans ...
(Date:4/30/2016)... ... April 30, 2016 , ... The Hacking Medicine Institute ... to critically evaluate and rank health-focused applications and connected devices for better disease ... unbiased and accurate information to help accelerate patient and provider adoption of clinically ...
(Date:4/30/2016)... ... , ... well is a challenge for all of us, but there are things we can do to ... “Research is showing more and more that there are simple, yet important steps that can ... age.” Top priorities Dr. Kohli’s recommends for her patients include;, , exercise ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... Mirmelli, a mother and divorcee, shares her enthusiasm for Botox and lip injections, which ... the world famous youth oriented Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. The article explains ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... , ... April 29, 2016 , ... Our bodies are ... way to confront and deal with these stressors is to adopt a more healthful ... good for you. Risa Groux, a certified Holistic Nutritionist and the creator of the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... 27, 2016  Hologic, Inc. (Nasdaq: ... for the fiscal second quarter ended March 26, ... $0.24 increased 41.2%, and non-GAAP diluted EPS of ... 5.8% on a reported basis, and 6.3% on ... posted another good quarter, highlighted by 14.6% growth ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... , le 27 Avril 2016 ... a progressé de +5% sur le trimestre, soutenu ... de consommables  Croissance de +16% des ... Mauna Kea Technologies (Euronext : MKEA, FR0010609263 ; ... confocale laser, annonce aujourd,hui son chiffre d,affaires pour ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... 2016 Elekta today announced that ... be the focal point of seven scientific presentations at ... for Radiotherapy & Oncology, taking place April 29 - ... radiotherapy system and a high-field MRI scanner with sophisticated ... patient,s anatomy in real time. The MR-linac is designed ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: