Navigation Links
Stress can control our genes
Date:9/24/2010

Stress has become one of the major disease states in the developed world. But what is stress? It depends on from where you look. You may experience stress as something that affects your entire body and mind, the causes of which are plentiful. But if we zoom in on the building bricks of the body, our cells, stress and its causes are defined somewhat differently. Stress can arise at the cellular level after exposure to pollution, tobacco smoke, bacterial toxins etc, where stressed cells have to react to survive and maintain their normal function. In worst case scenario, cellular stress can lead to development of disease.

Researchers from Dr.Klaus Hansen's group at BRIC, University of Copenhagen, have just shown that external factors can stress our cells through the control of our genes. "We found that stress-activating factors can control our genes by turning on certain genes that were supposed to be silenced. It is very important that some genes are on and others are off in order to ensure normal foetal development and correct function of our cells later in life" says Dr. Klaus Hansen. Simmi Gehani, PhD-student in the Hansen group, found that exposing human cells to a stress-activating compound turned on silenced genes. Even brief changes in gene activation can be disastrous during foetal development as establishment of correct cellular identity can be disturbed in our cells. But altered gene activity can also have consequences in the adult body. "For example, one could imagine that prolonged stress causes nerve cells in the brain to produce hormones and other signalling molecules they do not normally produce and this can disturb normal brain function" says Simmi Gehani.

The Hansen research group is very interested in understanding how our genes are turned on and off. "We know that different protein complexes can associate with specific proteins (histones) to which DNA is wound around and thereby determine whether the genes are active or inactive. Small chemical groups can cause protein complexes to bind to histones and these can control gene activity" says Dr. Klaus Hansen. The researchers have studied in detail a complex called PRC2. PRC2 can attach small chemical groups - methyl groups - to the histones. Protective complexes can bind to the histones when this marker is present and the genes are turned off. Their new results show that the protective complexes are lost and selected genes turned on when cells are exposed to external stress factors. The reason why the complexes are lost is that the stress factors instruct an enzyme named MSK to attach another chemical group - a phosphate group - to the histones neighbouring the methyl group. The phosphate group neutralises the effect of the methyl group and turns specific genes on. "The consequence is that genes that should be turned off are now active and this may disturb cellular development, identity and growth" says Simmi Gehani. This means that without damaging our genetic code external stress factors can control the activity of our genes. The results are published today in the renowned international journal Molecular Cell.


'/>"/>

Contact: Klaus Hansen
klaus.hansen@bric.ku.dk
453-532-5664
University of Copenhagen
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Early life stress may predict cardiovascular disease
2. Say “I Love You” From Head to Toe with a Gift That's Healthy and Soothes Away Stress this Valentine's Day
3. Tired of Snow, Sleet, and Stress? Join Deepak Chopra for a Week-Long Meditation Retreat this March in Florida's Warm Sunshine
4. New research shows emotional impact of low sexual desire and associated distress
5. Stress hormone, depression trigger obesity in girls
6. Brain Balancing Gives Hope for Sufferers of Depression, Stress, and Insomnia at New Life Brain Center
7. Family members reduce stress in advanced cancer patients with 14 minute massages
8. Childhood stress such as abuse or emotional neglect can result in structural brain changes
9. Good Parenting Triumphs Over Prenatal Stress
10. Promotional Stress Ball Supplier -- StressBallsUK.com Starts 2010 Strongest Ever
11. New research shows innovative respiratory stress test can quickly detect significant coronary artery disease in a noninvasive setting
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Stress can control our genes
(Date:6/25/2016)... Montreal, Canada (PRWEB) , ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... the pursuit of success. In terms of the latter, setting the bar too high ... low, risk more than just slow progress toward their goal. , Research from ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Marcy was in a crisis. Her son James, eight, was ... his family verbally and physically. , “When something upset him, he couldn’t control his emotions,” ... He would throw rocks at my other children and say he was going to kill ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Comfort Keepers® of San Diego, ... and the Road To Recovery® program to drive cancer patients to and from their ... to ensure the highest quality of life and ongoing independence. Getting to and ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The Haute Beauty Network, affiliated ... Weintraub as a prominent plastic surgeon and the network’s newest partner. , ... most handsome men, look naturally attractive. Plastic surgery should be invisible.” He stands ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Venture Construction Group (VCG) sponsors Luke’s Wings 5th Annual ... Country Club at 1201 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland, 20852. The event raised funds ... been wounded in battle and their families. Venture Construction Group is a 2016 Silver ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... June 24, 2016   Pulmatrix, Inc ., (NASDAQ: ... innovative inhaled drugs, announced today that it was added ... reconstituted its comprehensive set of U.S. and global ... is an important milestone for Pulmatrix," said Chief Executive ... awareness of our progress in developing drugs for crucial ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Any dentist who ... challenges of the current process. Many of them do not ... the technical difficulties and high laboratory costs involved. And those ... offer it at such a high cost that the majority ... Dr. Parsa Zadeh , founder of Dental ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 ... CAPR ), a biotechnology company focused on the ... announced that patient enrollment in its ongoing randomized ... has exceeded 50% of its 24-patient target. Capricor ... the third quarter of 2016, and to report ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: