Navigation Links
Stress May Encourage E. Coli Illness
Date:3/19/2009

Anxiety-linked hormones could spur the stomach bug's activity, research suggests

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they have found a possible link between stress-induced sickness and a diarrhea-causing strain of the E. coli bacterium.

Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center say the newly discovered QseE receptor, found on the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strain, picks up signals when stress hormones are released in the body. Once activated, this pathogen -- which usually enters the body through contaminated food such as raw meat -- sets off a series of reactions that release toxins into the body. This process changes the makeup of other cells and robs the body of nutrients.

"The bacteria get what they want -- nourishment -- and the person ends up getting diarrhea," study senior author Vanessa Sperandio, UT Southwestern associate professor of microbiology, said in a news release issued by the school.

QseE, which is found only in intestinal bacteria, works with the known previously found QseC sensor kinase (enzyme) on the EHEC bacterium. QseC, discovered by Sperandio's lab about three years ago, provides the timing for the bacterium's actions, including the regulation of the genes necessary for EHEC to cause diarrhea. It appears to have a key role in other disease development because its senses stress cues, mostly from body chemicals generally linked to blood poisoning, also known as sepsis.

"Patients with high levels of phosphate in the intestine have a much higher probability of developing sepsis due to systemic infection by intestinal bacteria," Sperandio said. "If we can find out how bacteria sense these cues, then we can try to interfere in the process and prevent infection."

The findings were published online March 10 and are scheduled to be published in a future print issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The human body usually hosts millions of potentially harmful bacteria that stay dormant until they receive a signal that it's to release their toxins. If those signals never arrive, the bacteria pass through the body without harm.

"There's obviously a lot of chemical signaling between host and bacteria going on, and we have very little information about which bacteria receptors recognize the host and vice-versa," Sperandio said. "We're scratching at the tip of the iceberg on our knowledge of this."

In previous research, Sperandio discovered that phentolamine, an alpha blocker used to treat high blood pressure, and a new drug called LED209, prevent QseC from doing its nasty work. Tests on whether phentolamine also works on QseE are expected to follow.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about bacteria and foodborne illness.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, news release, March 10, 2009


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. New research shows how chronic stress worsens neurodegenerative disease course
2. Ability to cope with stress can increase good cholesterol in older white men, study finds
3. Handling Stress Properly Increases Good Cholesterol
4. New Alzheimers findings: High stress and genetic risk factor lead to increased memory decline
5. Stressed-Out Moms Carry Babies on the Right
6. New Asthma Guidelines Stress Disease Control
7. Latest DES Analysis Stresses Importance of Physicians Well-Trained in Implantation Technique and Patient Follow-Up
8. Study identifies key player in the bodys immune response to chronic stress
9. Environmental stress probed in cardiovascular disease, diabetes
10. Parents PTSD May Boost Stress in Offspring
11. New nurses report job stress, need for better management
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Stress May Encourage E. Coli Illness
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Drs. Steven White and Brad Haines are pleased to announce ... of this offer, valued at more than $300 per year, new patients can enjoy ... patients receive a complimentary professional whitening procedure. , Stained or yellowed tooth enamel ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Nightingale College continues the semiannual Give Back Day tradition for ... College dedicates to serving and volunteering for organizations that provide indispensable resources to the ... that need a little extra help. , The College’s Give Back Day initiative ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... August 23, 2017 , ... MobilityWorks ®, the nation's ... the 2017 Inc. 500|5000, an exclusive ranking of America’s fastest-growing private companies. MobilityWorks ... percent, marking the twelfth year that the company has been included on the ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... August 23, 2017 , ... ... (SNAC) is holding an inaugural State of the Science Symposium in partnership ... Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017. , This symposium provides a forum for global leaders ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... NASHVILLE, Tenn. (PRWEB) , ... August 22, 2017 ... ... Company, is pleased to announce the addition of Zack Tisch as the ... services for the KLAS-ranked healthcare IT consulting firm’s national accounts, from assisting clients ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/7/2017)... Mich., Aug. 7, 2017  Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO), ... the quarter ended June 30, 2017.  All comparisons, unless otherwise ... Second Quarter 2017 Highlights ... to $1,089 million, an increase of 3.5% ... Gross margin of 7.5% versus 7.6% ...
(Date:8/4/2017)... , Aug. 4, 2017 The search ... shortly after a physician/patient consult has long been the ... was a notable focus of the largest meeting of ... according to healthcare market research firm Kalorama Information.  The ... testing (POCT) offerings or related supplies and software were ...
(Date:8/3/2017)... , Aug. 3, 2017  Opioid addiction and other ... up healthcare costs and threatening outcomes, were problems taken ... and IVD industry that support them, met this week. ... researcher said that drugs of abuse, procalcitonin and acute ... at the organization,s 69th meeting in San ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: