Navigation Links
Stopping harmful oral bacteria in its path is goal for Case Western Reserve researcher

CLEVELANDThe best way to keep bacteria from doing any damage is to stop them in their tracks before they can start down their pathological road to destruction.

Yiping Han, associate professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine, aims to understand how to build roadblocks for a common bacterium that's harmless in a mother's mouth but can turn deadly when it reaches an unborn child. She has received a five-year, $1.85 million grant from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) at the National Institutes of Health to fund the effort.

This is Han's second NIDCR RO1 award. She's published more than 10 papers from previous research related to the bacterium, Fusobacterium nucleatum, that creates havoc once it leaves the mouth and enters the blood stream.

She has discovered an adhesin protein molecule, called FadA, in the genes of F. nucleatum. This adhesin, or binding agent, on the bacteria allows them to connect with receptors on epithelial cells in the mouth and later the endothelial cells of the placenta.

In tests, bacteria without FadA had less binding capability compared to those with the adhesin, Han and a team of researchers report on this finding in the July issue of the journal Infection and Immunity.

"With this new grant, we will be able to continue a functional analysis of FadA," said Han. Her research group will look not only at the binding agent but the receptors on the host epithelial and endothelial cells that promote the binding of the oral bacteria.

"In some way, the receptors on the host cell activate a signal that puts into action a cascade of processes that allow the bacteria to penetrate the epithelial and endothelial linings and then colonize," explains Han.

"We want to block the bacteria before it can do any damage," Han says. "It's an upstream approach to go back to where the whole process begins and stop it from starting its destruction."

Once it leaves the mouth, the invasion of the bacteria through the placenta allows the bacteria to multiple rapidly in the immune-free environment that protects the fetus from being rejected by the mother's body. The rapid bacterial growth causes the placenta to become inflamed. In turn, the inflammation can trigger preterm birth and fetal death.

According to Han this research into the mechanisms of bacterial transport not only has potential to prevent preterm and stillborn births, it may have implications in preventing periodontal disease. Periodontal disease has been linked to such health problem as arthritis, diabetes and heart disease.


Contact: Susan Griffith
Case Western Reserve University

Related medicine news :

1. Stopping Statins After Stroke Doubles Death Risk
2. Stopping Tysabri May Worsen MS
3. On 30th Anniversary, Angioplasty Celebrated as Modern Medical Breakthrough in Stopping Heart Attack
4. Hands2GO(R) Hand Sanitizer Offers Alcohol-Free Alternative to Stopping the Spread of Flu at School and Work
5. Common drug for stopping preterm labor may be harmful for babies
6. New Sedona Stopping Diabetes Program
7. New Booklet Reveals 12 Proven Methods for Stopping MRSA from Infecting Your Feet and Your Familys Feet
8. First 90 Days After Stopping Plavix Most Dangerous
9. Physicians focus on stopping pain epidemic
10. Fugitive cancer cells can be blocked by stopping blood cells that aid them
11. Stopping a receptor called nogo boosts the synapses
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... management services, today announced its partnership with WPC Healthcare , a provider ... systems and organizes the data into an aggregated data repository necessary to perform ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... announced today their sponsorship of the Microsoft Dynamics AXUG, GPUG and NAVUG Summits ... GPUG Summit and NAVUG Summit are independent user conferences designed and led by ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... 13, 2015 , ... Relay (, a technology company that ... significant contract that will provide its award-winning private messaging solution to Independence Blue ... success of its Relay program, IBX Wire™, which now has over 550,000 members ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... ... A child without a healthy mouth is much more likely to have ... system, has joined with Global Dental Relief (GDR) to help bring dental ... purchased, SmileCareClub will donate one clinic visit to a child in Kenya. , “When ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... ... October 13, 2015 , ... ... targets the unique health needs of new moms. Postnatal Omega-3, which has ... ), utilizes Nordic Naturals’ exclusive, new, ultra-concentrated omega-3 oil. This breakthrough ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/13/2015)... Oct. 13, 2015  SeraCare Life Sciences, a leading ... that the company,s precision medicine business unit has launched ... materials for next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based tumor profiling assays.  The ... the same mixture of mutations in key oncogenes and ... AF20 mix , but is offered at five additional ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... 2015  Graduate students across the country, with ... will soon have the opportunity to learn about ... drug discovery and development process. Eli Lilly and ... 10 leaders from academic institutions to create an ... of Drug Development."  Lilly will formally unveil the ...
(Date:10/13/2015)... WASHINGTON , Oct. 13, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... the first-ever direct-to-consumer laboratory home testing kit ... and digital technologies provide an unparalleled, detailed ... of breast milk—fats, proteins, carbs and key ... digital portal for personal health tracking.  In addition, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: