Navigation Links
Stopping Controversial Asthma Drugs Could Have Downside: Study

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- It's OK for some patients with asthma to stick with a combination of medications instead of abandoning one because of concerns about complications, a new analysis of existing research suggests.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned that asthma patients who take both long-acting beta-agonist and inhaled corticosteroid medications should be cautious about using them together once their condition is under control.

Long-acting beta-agonists -- such as drugs known by the brand names Serevent, Foradil and Brovana -- could cause side effects, the FDA cautioned, as could combination drugs. For that reason, the agency suggested that patients consider going with inhaled corticosteroids alone.

However, the new analysis came to a different conclusion. "Adding a long-acting beta-agonist to an inhaled corticosteroid medication makes a lot of sense in a number of patients since you get better control of the disease," said Dr. Thomas Casale, chief of allergy and immunology at Creighton University, and lead author of the report.

The report was published online Aug. 27 in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

At issue is how to best treat adults and older children who suffer from moderate to severe asthma.

Inhaled corticosteroids, which come in inhalers and are known by brand names such as Azmacort and Flovent, are often prescribed by themselves to reduce wheezing and other symptoms. They're usually taken daily but don't relieve asthma attacks when they're occurring. (Short-acting beta-agonists, such as the drug albuterol, treat asthma attacks themselves.)

The newer long-acting beta-agonists are frequently used with inhaled corticosteroids. Some medications, sold under the brand names Symbicort and Advair, combine both types of drugs.

This latest analysis, which examined five studies involving patients aged 15 or older, found that removing a long-acting beta-agonist -- but continuing treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid -- was worse for patients than continuing both drugs.

Patients who dropped the long-acting beta-agonists reported more asthma problems and fewer days with no symptoms. The findings also suggested that these patients needed more treatment of asthma attacks. The studies, however, didn't allow researchers to examine the risk of death under the different approaches.

Casale said he doesn't think the FDA's concerns about death and other health problems -- which resulted in a bold warning on drug labels -- have deterred physicians from prescribing the combination treatments. However, he said, they have reinforced guidelines recommending against using the long-acting beta-agonists as treatments by themselves.

"I think all of us agree with that," he said. "They're only to be used in conjunction with an inhaled corticosteroid, and only in those who aren't adequately controlled."

In an accompanying journal editorial, Dr. Chee Chan and Dr. Andrew Shorr, both from the division of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Washington Hospital Center in Washington D.C., wrote that they hoped the analysis "helps to lift some of the black clouds" in the debate over the use of the asthma drugs.

More information

For more about asthma, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: Thomas B. Casale, M.D., professor of medicine and chief, allergy and immunology, Creighton University, Omaha, Neb.; Aug. 27, 2012, Archives of Internal Medicine, online

Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Stopping Blood Thinners Raises Stroke Risk for Patients With Irregular Heartbeat
2. Stopping and starting cancer cell cycle weakens and defeats multiple myeloma
3. Opioid receptors as a drug target for stopping obesity
4. U.S. Gives Green Light to Publish Controversial Bird Flu Research
5. Controversial vaccine trial should never have been run in India, researchers say
6. Supreme Court Backs Much of Controversial Health Reform Law
7. Rapid Asthma Treatment in ER May Prevent Admission
8. Some Schools Dont Let Kids Carry Asthma Inhalers
9. Secondhand smoke continues to vex children with asthma
10. Many Asthmatic Kids Harmed by Secondhand Smoke: Study
11. Seniors Undertreated for Asthma, and Many Skip Inhalers: Study
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Stopping Controversial Asthma Drugs Could Have Downside: Study
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... ... For the first time, Vitalalert is donating half of its earnings to ... between the two groups began in 2014 with Vitalalert pledging a portion of every ... founded in 1954 and is an international Christian-based health organization whose mission is to ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... November 25, 2015 , ... According to ... surgical robot is being more and more widely heralded as a breakthrough for performing ... Vinci method has over traditional laparoscopic surgery is that it can greatly reduce the ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... ... people across the country to celebrate their sobriety and show through pictures what ... “before and after” photos this Thanksgiving with the hashtag #FacesOfGratitude on their Facebook, ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Dental professionals who would like to become more ... to attend Dr. Mark Iacobelli’s Advanced Implant Mentoring (AIM) CE course. Courses will be ... As the co-founders of Advanced Implant Mentoring (AIM), Dr. Iacobelli and Dr. D’Orazio are ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... On November 25, 2015, officials of ... network, announced the release of a new cutting edge recovery program that has been ... working with drug- and alcohol-addicted individuals with the purpose to free addicts from the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... N.Y. , Nov. 25, 2015  Linden Care, ... and optimizing treatment outcomes for patients suffering from chronic ... request for a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) enjoining Express ... the two companies. --> ... pursuing all of its legal options. ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... WILMINGTON, N.C. , Nov. 25, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... announces the planned investment of at least $15.8 ... in Wilmington, NC . The ... services capacity to meet the growing demands of ... Wilmington site expansion will provide up ...
(Date:11/25/2015)... -- On Tuesday, November 24, 2015, the jury ... Medical Technology, Inc. for product liability and misrepresentation ... device, awarded $11 million in favor of Plaintiff ... three days of deliberations, the jury found that ... and unreasonably dangerous, and that Wright Medical made ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: