Navigation Links
Stem Cells Used for 'Biological Pacemaker'
Date:7/22/2009

In experiments with mice, researchers corrected electrical problems of the heart

WEDNESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Stem cells from a type of human fat tissue may one day be able to reverse the electrical problems in the heart that pacemakers now correct, Japanese scientists report.

Researchers grew "beating" cells with properties similar to the heart's conductive tissue from stem cells taken from the brown fat tissue of mice. They then injected them into rodents with reduced heart rates caused by electrical signaling problems known as atrioventricular (AV) block.

After a week, the AV block was completely reversed or partially reversed in half of the test mice, according to the report scheduled to be presented Wednesday at the American Heart Association's Basic Cardiovascular Sciences Conference in Dallas. No change was observed in the control mice, they said.

The beating cells, which researchers colored green so they would be easy to see, were found to have attached near the section of the heart that manages its electrical conduction systems.

"Electronic pacemakers are often used as palliative therapy (helpful but not curative treatment) for people who have conduction problems with the electrical signals that govern the heart beat. However, that therapy has several shortcomings, including possible malfunction and the need for repeated replacement of the device's power packs and electrodes," study lead author Dr. Toshinao Takahashi, a research fellow at Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine in Chiba, Japan, said in an American Heart Association news release. "Cell therapy could overcome those problems and provide a possible cure for conductive disease. Our goal is to create a biological pacemaker."

Brown fat tissue is a source of mesenchymal stem cells, which previous studies have shown can develop into many different types of cells, such as bone, neuron, muscle, liver and fat cells. After isolating these cells in a laboratory, the Japanese team managed to grow groups of spontaneously beating cells. One tube-like group of cells resembled the heart's fine muscle fiber, while all contained two proteins, chemical markers and other similarities to the heart's own pacemaker-like cells.

"Our findings suggest that brown-fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells…may become a useful cell source for antiarrhythmic therapy," Takahashi said.

More information

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about pacemakers.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, July 22, 2009


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Tumors use enzyme to recruit regulatory T-cells and suppress immune response
2. Brain cells work differently than previously thought
3. Embryonic Stem Cells Repair Human Heart
4. Embryonic Human Stem Cells May Help Repair Heart Muscle, Lab Study Shows
5. Circulating fats kill transplanted pancreas cells, study shows
6. Experimental anti-cancer drug made from corn lillies kills brain tumor stem cells
7. Melanoma drug revs immune cells but cancer cells ignore it
8. Scientists explain how insulin secreting cells maintain their glucose sensitivity
9. Embryonic stem cells used to grow cartilage
10. Molecular probe paints cancer cells in living animals, Stanford researchers find
11. USC researcher identifies stem cells in tendons that regenerate tissue in animal model
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Stem Cells Used for 'Biological Pacemaker'
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... On June 10-11, 2016, A Forever Recovery, a holistic treatment ... Longest Breakfast Table in Battle Creek, MI, where the rehabilitation facility is located. This ... of the world’s leading providers of cereal and other breakfast foods. Its residents often ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... and applications at AcademyHealth’s Annual Research Meeting June 26-28, 2016, at the Hynes ... important health care topics including advance care planning, healthcare costs and patient and ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, Dr. Omkar Marathe earned his ... David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained in Internal Medicine at Scripps ... in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where he had the opportunity to ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Those who have experienced traumatic events may suffer from a complex set ... drug or alcohol abuse, as a coping mechanism. To avoid this pain and suffering, ... traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend to feel a range of emotions, from depression, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Francisco, CA (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 ... ... CitiDent, is now offering micro-osteoperforation for accelerated orthodontic treatment. Dr. Cheng has extensive ... self-ligating Damon brackets , AcceleDent, and accelerated osteogenic orthodontics. , Micro-osteoperforation ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 ... CAPR ), a biotechnology company focused on ... today announced that patient enrollment in its ongoing ... Duchenne) has exceeded 50% of its 24-patient target. ... in the third quarter of 2016, and to ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 , ... on Thursday, July 7, 2016 , , , , LOCATION: ... , , , , EXPERT PANELISTS:  , , , ... Senior Industry Analyst, Christi Bird; Senior Industry Analyst, Divyaa Ravishankar and ... The global pharmaceutical industry is witnessing an exceptional era. ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... LONDON , June 23, 2016 ... environments  Oticon , industry leaders in ... the launch of Oticon Opn ™, the world,s ... world of possibilities for IoT devices.      ... Opn, Oticon introduces a number of ,world firsts,: ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: