Navigation Links
Statins May Hamper Workout Results
Date:5/23/2013

By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Statins are proven drugs taken by millions to lower their cholesterol, but the medications also could hamper heart patients' ability to improve their cardiovascular health through exercise, researchers say.

A small group of overweight or obese people were unable to make any significant fitness gains while taking a 40 milligram daily dose of simvastatin, while another group not on the drug but undergoing the same exercise regimen did show improvement, found the study released online in advance of print publication in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

"If you exercise a group of people, they are going to have an increase in their fitness," said study author John Thyfault, an associate professor at the Clinical Research Center in the University of Missouri School of Medicine. "In our group who was only taking statins, the improvements were blocked or did not occur."

This finding could drastically affect the way physicians treat heart patients, particularly if it is found that other types of statin medications have the same negative effect on exercise benefits, Thyfault said.

People at risk for heart disease or metabolic syndrome (a cluster of factors that raise the risk for coronary artery disease, stroke and diabetes) often are prescribed statins to lower their blood cholesterol and at the same time advised to exercise more, he said. Both statins and exercise have been independently proven to lower cardiovascular disease risk, but may not pair well.

"Statins have saved lives, but I think physicians need to be careful about who they prescribe to, that it should be reserved for the most at-risk patients," Thyfault said. "We need to rethink it. Not like a lot of people used to say, that statins should be put in the water supply."

In the study, 19 people at risk for cardiovascular disease were placed on a 12-week exercise regimen in which they walked or jogged on a treadmill for 45 minutes, five days a week. Another 18 people were placed on the same exercise regimen but also were prescribed a daily dose of simvastatin, sold commercially under the brand name Zocor.

The people assigned exercise alone ended up experiencing a 10 percent improvement in their cardiorespiratory fitness, while those taking simvastatin only enjoyed a 1.5 percent increase in fitness, the researchers found.

Additionally, people in the exercise-only group experienced a 13 percent increase in "skeletal muscle mitochondrial content," meaning that their muscle cells became more efficient in converting glucose and oxygen into energy. People taking simvastatin had a 4.5 percent decrease -- their muscles actually became less capable of using energy.

At the same time, the drug did help reduce cholesterol for those taking it. Total cholesterol decreased by 29 percent and "bad" LDL cholesterol decreased by 38 percent in the exercise-plus-statin group, while there were no significant changes in total cholesterol or LDL in the exercise-only group.

This study should prompt more research into whether other types of statins have the same effect and whether a lighter dosage would make a difference, said Dr. Robert Eckel, a professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and past president of the American Heart Association. He was not involved with the study.

"I'm not totally surprised by this. The idea of exercise and statins and the interactions between the two of them has been known for some time," Eckel said. "The new wrinkle here is the idea that fitness is modified in terms of the training effect."

Eckel said it is also very likely that other statins will have the same effect, given that they all work in much the same way.

At the same time, it is too soon for heart patients to toss away their medication in favor of exercise, he continued.

"It's hard to refute a large amount of data that supports the benefit of statins in preventing heart disease," Eckel said. "And in general, a healthy lifestyle, you can't leave that on the shelf and say if you're on a statin don't bother trying to work out. At this time, I would not tell a patient to remain physically inactive, but it does raise a question that needs to be further researched."

More information

Visit the American Heart Association for advice on exercise and heart health.

SOURCES: John P. Thyfault, associate professor, Clinical Research Center, University of Missouri School of Medicine; Robert H. Eckel, M.D., professor of medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, and past president, American Heart Association; April 12, 2013, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Zocor Side Effects Update: Bernstein Liebhard LLP Comments on New Study Linking Kidney Problems to High Doses of Zocor, Other Statins
2. High-Dose Statins Linked to Acute Kidney Damage
3. TV Ads for Statins May Drive Overtreatment
4. VABC Responds to Study on Use of Cholesterol Lowering Drug Statins on Cancer Patients
5. UT MD Anderson study finds link between statins and improved survival in inflammatory breast cancer
6. Statins Plus Exercise Best at Lowering Cholesterol, Study Finds
7. Statins have potential to treat an autoimmune clotting disorder called antiphospholipid syndrome
8. Statins May Cut Risk of Death From Cancer, Study Suggests
9. New Drug May Help Those Who Cant Take Statins
10. Statins Wont Hurt, Might Even Help, Your Pancreas: Study
11. Statins Heart Benefits Outweigh Diabetes Risk: Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Statins May Hamper Workout Results
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Atlantic Information Services, Inc. (AIS) is pleased to announce its ... the Pharma Landscape .” CMS recently proposed a test of alternate payment models for ... preserving care provided to beneficiaries. The webinar will review the details of this model, ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... ... May 02, 2016 , ... The Evolve Paddle Board Company- which specializes ... today the outcome of their partnership with Yoloha Yoga- producers of high quality cork ... , SUP yoga has seen a dramatic rise in popularity throughout the last few ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... TN (PRWEB) , ... May 02, 2016 , ... ... and behavioral health services, today announced the opening of Twin Lakes Recovery Center. ... will be Summit’s first in the state. The residential facility is set ...
(Date:5/2/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... May 02, 2016 , ... ... offering regenerative therapy, which includes amniotic fluid/“stem cells” and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) ... athletes and celebrities,” said Dr. James Baranski, D.C., of Advanced Spine & Sport ...
(Date:5/1/2016)... ... May 01, 2016 , ... Women’s Excellence ... new mothers a better understanding of what to expect after they deliver. The ... baby postpartum, · The blues and depression, · Breastfeeding beyond postpartum · Baby ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... , April 29, 2016 ... glyco-biology expertise, today announces the appointment of Dr. ... Dr. Zurlo is an oncologist with many years clinical ... and biotechnology industries. His last role was at Mologen ... of the Executive Board. Previously Dr. Zurlo held various ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... BURLINGAME, Calif. , April 28, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... first-ever widely accessible breast and ovarian cancer risk ... cancer panel analyzing 30 genes that highly impact ... and women. Available today, the Color Test analyzes ... pancreatic, prostate, stomach, and uterine cancers. The Color ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... April 28, 2016 Dr. Vivek ... and Ste phen Schmidt ... a leading provider of cloud-based software solutions for life sciences, today ... to bring a wealth of insight to a growing business.  This ... George Phillips joined ArisGlobal in the position ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: