Navigation Links
Statins Don't Reduce Colon Cancer Risk, Study Finds

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A large-scale new study found that postmenopausal women who take cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins do not reduce their risk for colorectal cancer.

Previous studies have suggested that statins may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. But this new study of more than 150,000 women found no reduced risk, regardless of the type of statin taken or for how long.

"The upshot was there was no significant difference in colorectal cancer risk between statin users and nonusers," lead researcher Dr. Michael S. Simon, a professor of oncology at Wayne State University in Detroit, said during a Monday afternoon press conference.

Simon was to present the findings at the American Association for Cancer Research's ninth annual Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference, which concludes Wednesday in Philadelphia.

For the study, Simon's team collected data on 159,219 postmenopausal women who took part in the Woman's Health Initiative study. Over 10 years of follow-up, there were 2,000 cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed among the women. Some 7.6 percent of the women were taking statins.

Simon said that results from several earlier studies had suggested a small reduction in colorectal cancer risk in people who use statins. But, most studies have found no association between statin use and reduced colorectal cancer risk.

Simon added, however, that this new study probably won't end the debate, and more research is needed about the role statins might play in cancer prevention. In fact, the impact of statin use on colorectal cancer risk deserves more study in certain types of patients, he said.

"A recent study suggested a possible greater effect of statins in reducing both cardiovascular and colorectal cancer risk among individuals with a genetic variation of the enzyme inhibited by statins," Simon said. "This finding suggests that future studies should focus on individuals at high risk based on family history or genetic predisposition."

Results of another study presented at the press conference showed that the gout drug allopurinol (Lopurin, Zyloprim) may be a potential treatment for colorectal cancer and prevention. The drug has been on the market for more than 20 years and costs only about $1.40 a month, according to lead researcher Dr. Andrea De Censi, director of the medical oncology unit at Galliera Hospital in Genoa, Italy.

But the study was small and preliminary, and more trials are needed before scientists can prove a real benefit for patients, the researchers said.

For the study, Censi's group did a preliminary trial that pitted allopurinol against a placebo in 73 patients with pre-cancerous colorectal polyps, with patients taking either a 100-mg or 300-mg dose of the drug. The patients stayed on their regimes for four to six weeks before their polyps were removed.

The researchers looked for changes in a tumor tissue biomarker dubbed Ki67. The researchers found that in the first 13 patients the level of Ki67 rose only 5 percent among those taking either dose of the drug, compared with more than doubling in patients taking a placebo.

In tumor tissue, the level of Ki67 rose 6 percent in patients taking 100 mg allopurinol and 12 percent in patients taking 300 mg allopurinol, while it increased 70 percent among those receiving a placebo, the researchers found.

"Taken together, our findings support the evidence of a preventive effect of allopurinol on colorectal carcinogenesis and therefore provide the rational for a larger clinical study," De Censi said during the press conference.

More information

For more information on colon cancer, visit the American Cancer Society.

SOURCES: Nov. 8, 2010, teleconference with Michael S. Simon, M.D., professor of oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, and Andrea De Censi, director of the medical oncology unit, Galliera Hospital, Genoa, Italy; presentations, American Association for Cancer Research ninth annual Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference, Nov. 7-10, 2010, Philadelphia

Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Statins did not reduce colorectal cancer in WHI analysis
2. Statins dont prove useful for general pediatric lupus population
3. Aspirin, Statins May Reduce Problems After Heart Surgery
4. Statins May Guard Against Rheumatoid Arthritis
5. Study Suggests Statins Could Help Some With Normal Cholesterol
6. Statins, Painkillers May Upset PSA Test Results
7. Some on Statins May Not Need Boost in Good Cholesterol
8. Statins May Not Be as Helpful for Those Without Heart Disease
9. Statins May Lower Rates of Prostate Cancer Recurrence
10. Statins associated with lower cancer recurrence following prostatectomy
11. MSU team studies connection between statins, tendon ruptures
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... ... Autism Speaks, the world’s leading autism science and advocacy organization, will take ... of people around the world. On December 1, supporters can make an online donation ... the personal stories behind those gifts. , Just as Black Friday and Cyber-Monday ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... Tennessee (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... Pharmacy Quality Trend Report . Throughout the past year there have been multiple breakthroughs ... mature state. During this transition, PharmMD has enabled their customers and partners to stay ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... ... am so thrilled, as a newbie here, to leave a mark for the entire staff,” ... Makeover® from California Casualty . Stephanie is in her fifth year teaching at Santan ... , “This is such an amazing school and we deserve a space where we can ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... Add a fresh touch to ... easy and affordable way to bring long-lasting style and cheer to any space. , ... clean the air and keep on giving all year long. , “Holiday plants make ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... Tudore Tranquility is a new restaurant in Tokyo, ... plant-based fine dining menu that is full of flavorful and creative dishes that exceed ... wedding dinner or a small intimate event. The décor looks stunning with gold and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... 1, a free mobile-first network that enables healthcare professionals ... new completely redesigned web version that includes uploading. The ... primarily on a desktop, to upload images directly from ... base, Figure 1 is hosting an event during the ... (RSNA) Annual Meeting. Joshua Landy , ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... WATERLOO, Ontario , Nov. 24, 2015 ... in digital X-Ray image sensing technology, will introduce its ... 2015 Technical Exhibition , November 29 to December 3, at ... portfolio of dynamic detectors for diagnostic and interventional imaging will ... Xineos family of advanced CMOS X-Ray detectors ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... , Nov. 24, 2015  NuShield, Inc., an industry leader in LCD screen protection and glare-elimination ... computer technology as part of their patient monitoring or electronic documentation system. ... ... ... A study in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: