Navigation Links
Spinal cord injury research hampered by animal models, says new study

WashingtonResearch on traumatic spinal cord injuries is hampered by a reliance on animal experiments that dont accurately predict human outcomes, says a new study in the upcoming edition of the peer-reviewed journal Reviews in the Neurosciences. The review was written by scientists with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.

Despite decades of animal experiments, we still dont have a drug to cure spinal cord injury in humans, says Aysha Akhtar, a neurologist with PCRM and the lead author. According to the Journal of the American Paraplegic Society, at least 22 agents were found to improve spinal cord injury in animals, but not one of these was helpful in humans, says Dr. Akhtar.

The paper outlines the numerous problems with translating animal data into effective human treatments, including the many variations between laboratory-induced injuries in animals and human injuries, the difficulties in interpreting functional outcomes in animals, and the multitude of inter-species differences in physiology and anatomy.

The extrapolation problem, in general, has been widely acknowledged by scientists of many disciplines and affiliations. According to data from the Food and Drug Administration, more than 90 percent of drugs that proved successful in animal tests are not approved for wider use after clinical trials in humans. In February, three U.S. government agencies, including the National Institutes of Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Toxicology Program announced a major new program aimed at ending the use of animals in safety testing of new chemicals and drugs.

Because of the extrapolation challenge, some fields, such as cancer research and toxicity testing, are moving toward a greater use of alternatives. Unfortunately, spinal cord research, a relatively newer endeavor, is not yet learning from the failure of other fields of inquiry. As Dr. Akhtar warns, We need to develop new, more effective research techniques.

Although scientists have just begun to develop alternatives to the use of animals in spinal cord injury research, several techniques show great promise. Researchers at the University of Miami, for example, are collaborating on the Human Spinal Cord Injury Model Project which uses imaging techniques, post-mortem analysis, and nerve conduction methods to understand human spinal cords. Other promising directions involve computer modeling, studies on human nerve tissues, and the study of human cadavers.

At least 250,000 Americans are living with spinal cord injuries; an estimated 10,000 Americans are diagnosed each year.


Contact: Simon Chaitowitz
Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine

Related medicine news :

1. The Future of Spine Care Has Just Gotten Better With the Use of SpineSix BioMotion Spinal System(TM)
2. Dynatronics Introduces New DynaPro Spinal Health System and X5 Turbo
3. U of M researchers identify process that may help treat Parkinsons, spinal cord injuries
4. Gel Enables Severed Spinal Cord Fibers to Regrow
5. Alberta physiologist earns top national honor for spinal cord research
6. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Protect the Spinal Cord, Heart, Brain and Eyes
7. Long-Term Data for 884 Patients Show Vertebroplasty for Osteoporotic Spinal Fractures Provides Dramatic Pain Relief, Greatly Decreases Disability
8. Physical Therapists Offer Low-Cost Solution to High-Cost Expenditures for Spinal Conditions
9. UD researchers discover technique for repairing gene defect that causes spinal muscular atrophy
10. UD researchers discover promising technique for repairing gene that causes spinal muscular atrophy
11. UCLA scientists restore walking after spinal cord injury
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/13/2017)... WI (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... As ... in medicine known as “patient engagement.” The patient is doing more than filling out ... partners. , “There is an increasing emphasis in health care and research on ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... PharmD ‘17, and Jennifer Huggins, PharmD ’17, along with clinical associate professor ... prevention of cardiovascular diseases during the 15th Annual Women’s Health Conference. The ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... York, NY (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... influential people in business to advocate for action towards gender equality at their inaugural ... views from around the globe, and reached a social audience of over 3 million. ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... “The Journey: From the Mountains to the Mission ... lost souls in the Philippines. “The Journey: From the Mountains to the Mission Field” ... the Bible. She has taught all ages and currently teaches a class of ladies ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 12, 2017 , ... The company has developed a suite ... regulatory authorities worldwide. From Children’s to Adults 50+, every formula has been developed ... , These products are also: Gluten Free, Non-GMO, Vegan, Soy Free, Non-Dairy*, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/4/2017)... 2017 OBP Medical , a ... devices, today announced regulatory approval from ... Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA)) to market ... retractor with integrated LED light source and smoke ... exposure of a tissue pocket or cavity during ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... 2017 The Rebound mobile app is poised to ... the tide of prescription drug addiction. The app empowers users ... and stepping down their dosage in a safe, controlled manner ... 2017; the first 100,000 people to sign up will enjoy ... ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... 25, 2017   Montrium , an industry ... today—from the IQPC Trial Master Files & Inspection ... that EastHORN Clinical Services has selected eTMF ... TMF management. EastHORN, a leading European contract research ... increase transparency to enable greater collaboration with sponsors, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: