Navigation Links
Spinal cement may provide real support for cancer patients
Date:1/12/2010

New technologies used to repair spinal fractures could soon be helping patients suffering from the bone marrow cancer multiple myeloma.

A research project led by engineers at the University of Leeds will focus on the disease an incurable cancer of the bone marrow that causes destructive lesions in bones and makes them more susceptible to fracture.

The study will analyse whether techniques such as injecting cements into the spine to stabilise the bone, or using plates to fix fractures can be adapted for affected patients.

Although incurable, improvements in treatment mean that patients with multiple myeloma are surviving for longer, with up to a third surviving for at least five years. However, a better prognosis means that secondary symptoms, such as painful bone deterioration, have more time to take effect.

"Our aim is to give people suffering from this disease a better quality of life. If the spine becomes weakened or fractures, patients can do little more than stay in bed and try to deal with the pain," said Professor of Spinal Biomechanics, Richard Hall, who is leading the research at Leeds' Faculty of Engineering. "The majority of multiple myeloma patients are in their sixties or older, but even simple things that we take for granted, such as sitting your grandchild on your knee, can become impossible for them."

The work will combine laboratory experiments with computer modelling to predict the impacts of various treatments on patients.

Professor Hall will be collaborating with researchers at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, housed at one of Canada's largest hospitals in Toronto, and clinicians from Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust.

The project team includes Mr Jake Timothy, Consultant Neurosurgeon in Leeds, who has developed an award winning clinical vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty service that can help to fix painful vertebrae and spinal compression fractures associated with osteoporosis. He has seen the dramatic improvement that such procedures can have on the pain scores of patients affected by vertebral myeloma.

"There is still so much unknown about the positive and negative effects of these procedures," he says. "This money will undoubtedly aid our understanding and help us select which patients will benefit the most from these procedures, improving their quality of life even further."

The 600,000 project has been funded through the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and will run for four years. The work is part of the 50M research portfolio led by the Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (iMBE) aimed at giving people '50 active years after 50'.

Professor Hall is also leading a 3 million EU-funded research project involving academic and industrial partners from Germany and Austria, looking at new ways of diagnosing and treating spinal fracture caused not only by disease, but by age and trauma.


'/>"/>

Contact: Profssor Richard Hall
r.m.hall@leeds.ac.uk
44-113-343-2132
University of Leeds
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Cialis Eases Erectile Dysfunction After Spinal Cord Injury
2. Summit on Spinal Muscular Atrophy
3. New Low-Back Pain Guidelines Should Encourage Patients to Utilize Spinal Manipulation
4. Pioneer Surgical Technology Hires New Spinal Franchise Manager
5. Video: Kyphon Supports World Osteoporosis Day on October 20, 2007 to Raise Awareness of Osteoporosis and Spinal Fracture Risk
6. Mayo Clinic clarifies diagnosis for serious blood vessel disease of brain and spinal cord
7. Spinal cord injury expert to be honored by research foundation
8. ArthroCare Releases New SpineWand(R) for Less Invasive Spinal Surgeries
9. Engineers developing new cements to heal spinal fractures
10. Polyanalgesic Consensus Panels New Treatment Guidelines Via Intraspinal Infusion for Severe Chronic Pain
11. Jefferson researchers find stem cells in degenerating spinal discs, potential for repair
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... Why does the prevalence of obesity continue to ... includes a fresh look into the cause of obesity in his new book “Body ... the knowledge needed to lead a healthy life. Proietto said understanding the regulation of ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... ... It can be argued that people these days spend as much time searching ... their human friends and family. As pets have assumed a bigger role in ... pet products has also increased. , For this reason, America’s Pet Health ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... The Behavioral ... of Distinction, recognizing the organization as a top behavioral service provider in the ... of clinical quality, staff satisfaction and qualifications, and consumer satisfaction. These areas are ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... Gateway Analytical, ... offering HIAC particle counting and sizing services for USP 788 and 789 particulate ... new service as a response to the needs of pharmaceutical and medical device ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... , ... December 06, 2016 ... ... on Friday, November 25th, when SevenPoint2 released the much-anticipated HydroFX for Water®. ... eye-catching label design. Featuring one of the world’s most powerful antioxidants, molecular ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/6/2016)... 2016  Viking Therapeutics, Inc. ("Viking") (NASDAQ: ... on the development of novel therapies for metabolic ... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted orphan ... X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD).  VK0214 is a novel, orally ... regulates the expression of genes believed to be ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... 2016 Breast Pump Market size is estimated ... by Global Market Insights, Inc. Continue Reading ... ... , , ... women employment rates and rising consumer awareness regarding importance of breast feeding will ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... , Dec. 6, 2016 In this ... reason to be hopeful.  A special kind of sunglasses, ... less anxious life. Photo - ... Robert Buck, the psychotherapist who developed and patented ... approach to overcoming anxiety and worry.  "Anxiety doesn,t ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: