Navigation Links
Some Diabetics May Not Benefit From Daily Aspirin
Date:6/25/2012

SUNDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans take a low-dose aspirin each day to help protect their hearts, but a new study suggests the pill's benefit may not extend to some people with type 2 diabetes.

Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death among people with type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association currently recommends low-dose aspirin therapy for people with the disease, but the new research found that more than half of people with type 2 diabetes were "aspirin resistant."

The researchers assessed aspirin resistance in nearly 150 men with an average age of 48 who had type 2 diabetes. Aspirin resistance was identified by measuring levels of a chemical called 11-dehydro-thromboxane beta-2 (11DhTx2), which is formed during the clotting process.

High levels of this chemical in the urine indicate resistance to aspirin and its anti-clotting benefits.

The team found that 53 percent of the diabetic patients were aspirin-resistant. They also found that 11DhTx2 levels were higher in patients who'd had diabetes for a longer time and who had higher urinary levels of a protein called micro albumin, an indicator of early kidney disease in people with diabetes.

There was no association between 11DhTx2 concentrations and insulin levels, insulin resistance or certain markers of inflammation, according to the study, which was scheduled to be presented Sunday at the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in Houston.

There was one surprise: Patients with higher blood-pressure readings and wider waistlines actually had lower 11DhTx2 levels compared to other patients -- suggesting that aspirin might work for them.

"These results provide new information about the factors associated with aspirin resistance," lead author Dr. Subhashini Yaturu, section chief of the Endocrinology and Metabolism Department at Stratton VA Medical Center in Albany, N.Y., said in an Endocrine Society news release.

"This may help doctors identify people who are likely to be aspirin resistant, so higher doses or different drugs can be prescribed to prevent blood clots," Yaturu added. "Further studies are required to clarify the appropriate dose of aspirin and/or other therapies for subjects with diabetes to prevent clots."

One expert found the results intriguing, but said it's premature to tell diabetics to quit their daily aspirin.

"Aspirin resistance is a growing concern, but until we have better ways to identify it in the office setting the current [American Diabetes Association] guidelines recommending low-dose aspirin therapy are reasonable," said Dr. Tracy Breen, director of diabetes care for North Shore-LIJ Health System in New Hyde Park, N.Y.

She said, however, that the study "is an example of where we are heading in the field of genomic medicine or personalized medicine -- the ability to truly tailor therapy to the individual in order to maximize positive effects of therapeutic agents [and minimize negative effects]."

Data and results presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more about type 2 diabetes.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCES: Tracy Breen, M.D., director of diabetes care, North Shore-LIJ Health System, New Hyde Park, N.Y.; The Endocrine Society, news release, June 24, 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Sleep Apnea May Be Linked to Nerve Damage in Diabetics
2. Sleep Apnea May Spur Carb Cravings in Diabetics
3. Sleep apnea linked to increased risk for carbohydrate craving among diabetics
4. Personalized Blood Pressure Therapy May Help Diabetics
5. Middle-Aged Diabetics May Need Earlier Colon Checks
6. Tai Chi increases brain size, benefits cognition in randomized controlled trial of Chinese elderly
7. Zane Benefits Announces Wellness HRAs: A New Way to Reward Healthy Employees
8. Flu shot during pregnancy shows unexpected benefits in large study
9. Screening for Lung Cancer Might Benefit Those at Highest Risk
10. Low-dose CT screening may benefit individuals at increased risk for lung cancer
11. Experts call for clinical trials to test non-skeletal benefits of vitamin D
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Some Diabetics May Not Benefit From Daily Aspirin
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... professionals, announced today its affiliation with Tennessee Counseling Association. This new ... network of the Tennessee Counseling Association, adding exclusive benefits and promotional offers. , ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... Quality metrics are proliferating in ... ways they remain in the eye of the beholder, according to experts who offered ... The American Journal of Managed Care. For the full issue, click here . ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... Brent Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal trainer ... through a fitness app. The fitness app plans to fix the two major problems leading ... a one size fits all type program , They don’t eliminate all the ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 25, 2016 , ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on June 21 due to ... a new, often overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability to live away from ... common occurrence, but a necessary one in the event that lice have simply gotten out ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... recover from injury. Recently, he has implemented orthobiologic procedures as a method for ... is one of the first doctors to perform the treatment. Orthobiologics are substances ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016   Pulmatrix, Inc ... company developing innovative inhaled drugs, announced today that it ... Russell Investments reconstituted its comprehensive set of U.S. ... "This is an important milestone for Pulmatrix," said ... increase shareholder awareness of our progress in developing drugs ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016  MedSource announced today that ... e-clinical software solution of choice.  This latest decision ... value to their clients by offering a state-of-the-art ... relationship establishes nowEDC as the EDC platform of ... full-service clients.  "nowEDC has long been a preferred ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... -- Research and Markets has announced the ... (Organic Chemical (Sugar, Petrochemical, Glycerin), Inorganic Chemical), Functionality (Filler, ... Global Forecast to 2021" report to their offering. ... pharmaceutical excipients market is projected to reach USD 8.1 ... the forecast period 2016 to 2021. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: