Navigation Links
Social, Health Care Factors Drive Colon Screen Disparities
Date:6/24/2008

Economic status, access and language barriers affect who goes for tests, study concludes

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- The higher death rate from colorectal cancer among minorities in United States may be linked to socioeconomic, health care access, language and cultural barriers that lead to less preventative screening among these groups, a new report finds.

The report, published in the June 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, analyzes national data about demographics, colorectal cancer screening and other social and health care factors from almost 23,000 older Americans surveyed in the first half of this decade.

While 54.1 percent of all those surveyed received colorectal cancer screening, either by colonoscopy or fecal occult blood testing, great disparities between ethnic and racial groups were apparent. Slightly more than 57 percent of whites received one of the procedures while only about 34 percent of Asians, 48 percent of blacks and 37 percent of Hispanics did.

These disparities among blacks, Hispanics and whites disappeared, however, when researchers factored out demographics, socioeconomic status, language spoken at home and access to health care access, the authors said.

"Beyond socioeconomic factors, which disproportionately affect minorities, these findings suggest the effect of access and, for Hispanics, language-appropriate care on colorectal cancer screening uptake," the authors wrote.

With Asians, though, culture issues seem to play more of a role in not undergoing the procedures, the researchers wrote.

"Less acculturated Asian individuals in the United States may have core health beliefs and values that differ from those in the Western health model, leading them to decline (fecal occult blood testing) or endoscopy offered in the absence of worrisome symptoms. They may also be less likely to be offered colorectal cancer screening," the authors wrote.

Colorectal cancer screening rates among the entire U.S. population are lower than those for other cancer screening tests, according to background information in the article.

The authors concluded that screening education programs tailored to each minority group, as well as improved health care access, could improve testing rates.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about colorectal cancer.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, June 23, 2008


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Adult ADHD significantly impacts on social, financial and personal aspects of life
2. Penn study finds pro-death proteins required to regulate healthy immune function
3. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
4. Air pollution linked to cardiovascular risk indices in healthy young adults
5. More proof needed of safety and quality of electronic personal health records
6. Health care incentive model offers collaborative approach
7. Loneliness is bad for your health
8. Mailman School of Public Health study examines link between racial discrimination and substance use
9. Green Tea May Brew Up Healthier Skin
10. For Health Info, Women Often Turn to the Web
11. Record Number of Americans Lack Health Insurance
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Social, Health Care Factors Drive Colon Screen Disparities
(Date:5/27/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Most us are familiar with the sound of occasional popping ... Osteoarthritis Initiative shows that certain people who experience consistent joint popping, grating and ... doctors the opportunity to treat patients before the problem becomes pronounced, potentially hedging off ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 26, 2017 , ... ... a new educational seminar to focus on current legislative activity and the latest ... begin at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 10, and will continue through Monday, Sept. ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... , ... May 26, 2017 , ... ... delicatessen foods, is sharing bold recipes for Memorial Day entertaining that are sure ... , “Boar’s Head fresh sliced meats and cheeses featured in these refreshingly ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... 26, 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at The House of ... on the Peace Agreements being discussed by President Donald Trump and the rest of ... try to speed up peace talks in the continuous battle between Israel and Palestine. ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 26, 2017 , ... “When the Stars Lead Home”: a poignant ... of published author Laura Weigel Douglas, an avid reader who lives in the Pacific ... sometimes feels like Green Hills Adventure Camp. She couldn’t be more grateful. , Twelve-year ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/4/2017)... SAN DIEGO , May 4, 2017  The ... Clinical and Scientific Meeting— OBP Medical , a leading ... announced the launch of a new extra-small size and ... ER-SPEC vaginal specula. Already available in small, ... sizes makes OBP Medical,s line of single-use lighted specula ...
(Date:5/4/2017)...   BioLife Solutions , Inc. (NASDAQ: ... proprietary clinical grade hypothermic storage and ... announced that the Company,s first quarter 2017 financial results ... 11, 2017, and that the Company will host a ... that afternoon. Management will provide an overview of the ...
(Date:5/3/2017)... May 3, 2017  Getinge, a leading global ... quality enhancement and cost efficiency within healthcare and ... of contemporary practice demonstrating that intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation ... critically ill patients. The single-center, retrospective, observational study ... volume MEGA ® 50cc intra-aortic balloon (IAB) ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: