Navigation Links
Social, Health Care Factors Drive Colon Screen Disparities
Date:6/24/2008

Economic status, access and language barriers affect who goes for tests, study concludes

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- The higher death rate from colorectal cancer among minorities in United States may be linked to socioeconomic, health care access, language and cultural barriers that lead to less preventative screening among these groups, a new report finds.

The report, published in the June 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, analyzes national data about demographics, colorectal cancer screening and other social and health care factors from almost 23,000 older Americans surveyed in the first half of this decade.

While 54.1 percent of all those surveyed received colorectal cancer screening, either by colonoscopy or fecal occult blood testing, great disparities between ethnic and racial groups were apparent. Slightly more than 57 percent of whites received one of the procedures while only about 34 percent of Asians, 48 percent of blacks and 37 percent of Hispanics did.

These disparities among blacks, Hispanics and whites disappeared, however, when researchers factored out demographics, socioeconomic status, language spoken at home and access to health care access, the authors said.

"Beyond socioeconomic factors, which disproportionately affect minorities, these findings suggest the effect of access and, for Hispanics, language-appropriate care on colorectal cancer screening uptake," the authors wrote.

With Asians, though, culture issues seem to play more of a role in not undergoing the procedures, the researchers wrote.

"Less acculturated Asian individuals in the United States may have core health beliefs and values that differ from those in the Western health model, leading them to decline (fecal occult blood testing) or endoscopy offered in the absence of worrisome symptoms. They may also be less likely to be offered colorectal cancer screening," the authors wrote.

Colorectal cancer screening rates among the entire U.S. population are lower than those for other cancer screening tests, according to background information in the article.

The authors concluded that screening education programs tailored to each minority group, as well as improved health care access, could improve testing rates.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about colorectal cancer.



-- Kevin McKeever



SOURCE: Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, June 23, 2008


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Adult ADHD significantly impacts on social, financial and personal aspects of life
2. Penn study finds pro-death proteins required to regulate healthy immune function
3. UCLA researchers identify markers that may predict diabetes in still-healthy people
4. Air pollution linked to cardiovascular risk indices in healthy young adults
5. More proof needed of safety and quality of electronic personal health records
6. Health care incentive model offers collaborative approach
7. Loneliness is bad for your health
8. Mailman School of Public Health study examines link between racial discrimination and substance use
9. Green Tea May Brew Up Healthier Skin
10. For Health Info, Women Often Turn to the Web
11. Record Number of Americans Lack Health Insurance
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Social, Health Care Factors Drive Colon Screen Disparities
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... ... The Smart Machine Age is here, and it’s disrupting everything. Not only could ... in the United States may be taken over by technology in the next five ... steamrolls over colleagues is drawing to a close. Success will belong to those who ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... With millions of Americans and ... that we all are aware of our options and are empowered with strength ... the launch of its newest edition of "Vision and Hearing" in USA Today, ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... , ... The narrative in “ Signal 8: An Australian Paramedic’s Story ” ... paramedic experiences. Schanssema describes the tragedies he saw, as well as his struggles with ... Schanssema, initially unsure of the career path he wanted to take, found fulfillment in ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... February 24, 2017 , ... The ... national conference convening academic faculty engaged in or interested in palliative care education and ... will be held in North County San Diego on Sept. 28 and 29, ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... ... The International Association of Eating Disorders Professionals (iaedp) announces the 2017 top ... mannequin art competition. Selected from 15 submissions from around the nation, the top five ... annual iaedp Symposium, March 22 – 26 in Las Vegas. , This year, the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/24/2017)... 2017 Physician General Dr. Rachel Levine ... Jennifer Smith commended South Central EMS today ... using naloxone, a life-saving overdose reversal drug. The recognition ... specialist and overdose survivor who was saved due to ... "A significant part of fighting the opioid epidemic is ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... , Feb. 23, 2017 The U.S. ... the PhenoTest BC Kit, performed on the Pheno ... organisms that cause bloodstream infections and provide information ... respond to (antibiotic sensitivity). The test also reduces ... this important information, which can guide antibiotic treatment ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... , Feb. 23, 2017  Directors from Pharma To Market Pty ... have joined forces, resulting in the founding of Pharma To Market ... Pharma To Market are pleased to announce their expansion into ... Singapore . The company are delighted to appoint ... of the Singapore based entity. Joelle brings ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: