Navigation Links
Smoking Still Takes a Heavy Toll in U.S., CDC Finds
Date:1/25/2013

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Even though proven anti-smoking strategies exist, more than 440,000 Americans still die each year from cigarette smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke, federal health officials said Friday.

And 8.6 million suffer from serious smoking-related illnesses, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report.

One reason: the implementation of policies to deter smoking is spotty across the country, officials said.

"We are seeing a large geographic disparity in smoking developing," said Dr. Tim McAfee, director of CDC's Office on Smoking and Health. Regional differences existed 20 years ago, "but nothing like what we are seeing today," he noted.

For example, about twice as many people in Kentucky smoke as in Utah and California, he said. Lung cancer rates are starting to mirror this pattern too, with higher rates in the states with more smokers and faster-declining rates in states with fewer smokers, McAfee said.

The differences are likely based on "the degree to which states have instituted policies that either promote or don't promote keeping kids from starting and encouraging adults to quit," McAfee said.

Some states have strict anti-smoking laws and high cigarette taxes, while other states, such as Texas, have no tobacco laws, he said.

A proven, multi-pronged strategy to curb smoking combines higher tobacco taxes, smoke-free laws, media campaigns, limits on tobacco advertising and promotions and restricted access to tobacco products and programs, the CDC said.

Dollars spent by the states on these programs vary widely, and no state spends the total amount the CDC recommends.

Maine spends about 80 percent of the recommended amount on these programs, while Tennessee spends 1.1 percent of the recommended amount, McAfee said.

The new report is designed for state officials and others to assess states' implementation of tobacco-control programs.

Overall, the picture is not encouraging.

States have billions to create policies that discourage smoking, collected from tobacco taxes and tobacco industry legal settlements. However, overall, states only use a small portion of these funds for anti-smoking programs, the CDC stated.

In 2013 alone, states will collect $25.7 billion from tobacco taxes and legal settlements, but plan to use less than 2 percent of that to develop programs that deter smoking, according to the agency.

Meanwhile, the cost of smoking-related illnesses approaches nearly $96 billion a year, and another $97 billion is lost in productivity each year, the report notes.

Other highlights of the Tobacco Control State Highlights 2012 report include:

  • Utah has the fewest smokers (about 12 percent), and Kentucky the most (29 percent).
  • Across all states, about 21 percent of residents smoke.
  • Among high school students, about 18 percent smoke.
  • 26 states and the District of Columbia have comprehensive smoke-free laws that ban smoking in restaurants, bars and workplaces.
  • 24 states have inadequate smoke-free laws.
  • Kentucky, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas, West Virginia and Wyoming have no laws to protect residents from secondhand smoke.
  • Cigarette taxes average $1.34 a pack nationally, ranging from $4.35 in New York to 17 cents in Missouri.
  • No states implemented CDC recommendations for smoking-cessation campaigns in 2010.

Health advocates hope that state legislators take note of the findings.

"As state legislatures convene across the country, the CDC report is a timely reminder both that tobacco use remains a huge public health problem and that it is an entirely winnable battle if elected officials implement proven strategies that prevent kids from smoking and help smokers quit," said Danny McGoldrick, vice president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

But states have gone backwards in recent years, McGoldrick said.

"They've cut funding for tobacco prevention programs by 36 percent and have slacked off in enacting tobacco-tax increases and smoke-free laws," McGoldrick said. New Hampshire went even further and reduced its tobacco tax last year.

"We urge state leaders to side with kids over 'Big Tobacco' and accelerate their efforts to reduce tobacco use," McGoldrick said.

More information

For more help quitting, visit the Smokefree.gov.

SOURCES: Tim McAfee, M.D., M.P.H., director, Office on Smoking and Health, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Danny McGoldrick, Vice President, Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids; Jan. 25, 2013, report, Tobacco Control State Highlights 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Anti-tobacco TV ads help adults stop smoking, study finds
2. Exercise helps smokers to quit smoking, to remain smoke-free and to reduce the risk of death
3. Small neural focus groups predict anti-smoking ad success
4. Some women may be genetically predisposed to smoking-related hot flashes
5. Friends Parents Can Sway Teens Odds for Drinking, Smoking
6. Fewer Young Americans Smoking, Survey Finds
7. Vitamin C improves pulmonary function in newborns of pregnant smoking women
8. Genetic marker may predict smoking quantity in African Americans
9. 5 percent of workers gave up smoking when the anti-tobacco law took effect
10. Vitamin C improves lung function in newborns of pregnant smoking women
11. States Use Only Fraction of Tobacco Revenues to Fight Smoking, Study Finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Smoking Still Takes a Heavy Toll in U.S., CDC Finds
(Date:2/13/2016)... ... February 13, 2016 , ... DDi ... Management Solution Providers list for its expertise in eClinical Solutions. DDi has built ... serve the technology needs of global clients. DDi provides smarter technology for Clinical ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... The Lymphoma Research Foundation (LRF) ... and serving the lymphoma community through a comprehensive series of education programs, outreach ... community at its 10th anniversary Fashion Luncheon on Monday, February 8, 2016. The ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... ... Coco Libre, the maker of coconut water beverages with a purpose, is ... Coco Libre will offer musicians and celebrities the company’s signature Organic Coconut Water, a ... suite, held this year at the W Hollywood Hotel, has become a pre-show “must” ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... NV (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... Fisher ... Las Vegas Mayor John J. Lee, Nevada Military Support Alliance president Scott Bensing, and ... House at the VA Southern Nevada Healthcare System. This will be the first ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Young Asset Protection, a ... beginning of the latest charity campaign in their community enrichment program. Art Expression ... this worthy cause are currently being accepted at: http://artexpressioninc.org/ . , Art ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... LONDON , Feb. 11, 2016 Stem ... that are characterized by self-renewal and the capacity to ... a relatively new discovery, as the first mouse embryonic ... it was not until 1995 that the first culturing ... pluripotent stem cells were not produced until 2006 As ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... 11, 2016  Walgreens has committed to provide drug ... Washington, D.C. as part of a ... commended by shareholder advocacy organization As You Sow. ... "Many people hold on to unneeded drugs because they lack ... consequences." --> Conrad MacKerron , Senior Vice ...
(Date:2/11/2016)...  NOIT™ Research LLC, a private, leading-edge autism research ... to assist needy families in obtaining one of its ... February 10, 2016 and March 31, 2016, the company ... NOIT is an auditory stimulus that plays a key ... Beth Shier , NOIT Research director. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: