Navigation Links
Smokers' Homes More Likely to House Hungry Kids
Date:11/4/2008

Study finds twice the incidence of 'food insecurity'

TUESDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Children who live with adult smokers are more likely to be underfed and undernourished, a new study finds.

The same is true for adult members of smoking households, but children feel the impact the most, said study author Dr. Michael Weitzman, chairman of pediatrics at New York University School of Medicine.

"We know that there are long-term consequences of food insecurity for children. They are more likely to do poorly in school, to have iron deficiency and anemia, and to have behavioral and social problems," Weitzman said.

"Food insecurity" is a concept that was developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the 1990s to study malnutrition in developed countries such as the United States. "It is a standardized scale measuring how many times a household cannot give children the food they want, how many meals they skip, how often they go to bed hungry," Weitzman said.

Looking at data on 8,817 households gathered in national surveys by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Weitzman and his colleagues found that 15 percent of adults and 11 percent of children reported food insecurity within the past year, with 6 percent of adults and 1 percent of children experiencing severe food insecurity. This meant they went to bed hungry, because there wasn't enough food in the house.

The study found that 23 percent of households with children had at least one smoker, with the incidence higher -- 32 percent -- in low-income households. In those households with a smoker, 17 percent of children were food insecure, compared to 8.7 percent of those children in nonsmoking households. Severe food insecurity was reported for 3.2 percent of children in smoking households, compared to 0.9 percent of those living in households with no smokers.

Because families with at least one smoker spend an estimated 2 percent to 20 percent of their income on tobacco, it's quite likely that smokers' habits drain the money needed to provide adequate food, according to background information with the study.

Parents feel the food pinch themselves, Weitzman said. "They cut back on feeding themselves before they cut back on the children's food," he said. "And parents tend to feed the youngest children better."

The findings were published in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine.

The problem is likely to grow worse, given the current condition of the economy, Weitzman said. "If the economic downturn persists, both food insecurity and adults smoking are likely to increase," he said, because smoking "is one of the hardest addictions to give up."

One sure way to reduce smoking -- raising the taxes on cigarettes -- has its own dangers, because it's likely to cut even more into the family food budget, Weitzman said.

Two other strategies should be considered, said John F. Banzhaf III, executive director and chief counsel of Action on Smoking and Health, a Washington, D.C.-based advocacy organization.

"The first would be to persuade or even require physicians to report, as the law already requires in suspected child abuse, instances where parents smoke at home in the presence of children, especially children who already have asthma, sinusitis or other conditions which make them especially sensitive and susceptible," Banzhaf said.

A more aggressive tactic would be to take steps against doctors who do not warn people about the dangers of smoking or provide effective smoking cessation treatment, he said. "One journal article has even gone so far as to suggest that the best, and perhaps the only, way to motivate most of them would be to begin bringing malpractice actions where medical problems results," he added.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine details the many problems caused by smoking.



SOURCES: Michael Weitzman, M.D., chairman of pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine, New York City; John F. Banzhaf III, executive director and chief counsel, Action on Smoking and Health, Washington, D.C.; November 2008, Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine


'/>"/>
Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Teens who see more smoking in movies may have increased risk of becoming established smokers
2. Smokers More Likely to Develop Dementia
3. Help is Available for Smokers Who Want to Quit as Minnesotas Smoke-Free Law Takes Effect Oct. 1
4. First Puff Can Turn Kids Into Smokers: Study
5. Statins reduce loss of function, keeping old lungs young - even in smokers
6. Blood Test Catches Secret Smokers
7. Smokers Remain Unaware of the Health Effects of Smoking, New Survey Finds
8. Smokers Cost Medicaid System Nearly $10 Billion
9. Studies of 20,000 smokers show quit rates double with counseling and free nicotine patches
10. Smoking Cessation Rates Double With Intensive Counseling and Free Nicotine Replacement Therapy, Studies of 20,000 Smokers Show
11. FSU researcher lands $3.3 million grant to help smokers kick habit
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... The Wharton ... $30,000 Perlman Grand Prize of the 2016 Wharton Business Plan Competition —as ... People’s Choice Award, and the Committee Award for Most ‘Wow Factor,’ making them ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... World Patent Marketing ... an exercise invention which aids in proper muscle development. , "The Gym & ... Creative Director of World Patent Marketing. "Globalization has threatened the future growth of ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... Melanoma is the deadliest type of skin ... blame for the majority of skin cancer deaths. More than 10,000 people are expected to ... at diagnosis is 62, it is the one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... 29, 2016 , ... New York City based oral and maxillofacial surgeon Dr. Majid Jamali ... way to treat obstructive sleep apnea. Dr. Jamali is proud to offer this permanent solution ... involves one or both jaw bones. This surgery is performed to correct the alignment of ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... nutritionists suggest dinner as the meal to miss. That was among the many new ... True Nutrition, on a recent Sharon Kleyne Hour® Power of Water® radio show. Bonny ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... , April 29, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... Contamine, Directeur Financier Sanofi, ... santé, publie ses résultats pour le ... du Groupe, Jérôme Contamine, commente les ... et les perspectives pour le reste ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... India , April 29, 2016 ... the life science laboratory due to the growing demands ... by advance technology, contemporary automated systems are already adept ... performed by slow, tedious and manual labor. Instrumentation continues ... were not even conceivable just a few years ago. ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... April 28, 2016  While Abbott,s announced purchase ... company,s valve repair and stent business, healthcare research ... Abbott more firmly into patient monitoring.  Kalorama said ... growing device areas, with double-digit growth expected the ... Advanced Remote Patient Monitoring . Abbott ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: