Navigation Links
Smile! It Might Lower Your Stress Level, Study Shows
Date:7/31/2012

TUESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Stressed out? Turn that frown upside down and you might just feel better, new research contends.

Researchers at the University of Kansas subjected college students to anxiety-inducing tasks and found that those who smiled through them appeared to have less stress.

The study, led by research psychologists Tara Kraft and Sarah Pressman, is scheduled for publication in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science.

"Age-old adages, such as 'grin and bear it,' have suggested smiling to be not only an important nonverbal indicator of happiness but also wishfully promotes smiling as a panacea for life's stressful events," Kraft said in a journal news release. "We wanted to examine whether these adages had scientific merit; whether smiling could have real health-relevant benefits."

To do so, they had 169 university students engage in tasks known to induce stress, such as tracing a star using their non-dominant hand while looking at a reflection of the star in a mirror. Another task had the participants plunge their hand into icy water.

The students performed these tasks under three conditions: not smiling; being explicitly instructed to smile; and while holding chopsticks in their mouth in a way that forced the face to smile.

The researchers included the chopsticks condition because they wanted to gauge the effect of "genuine" smiling (which involves the muscles around the mouth and eyes), and so-called "standard" smiles, which involve only the muscles around the mouth -- the kind of smile induced by the chopsticks.

Kraft and Pressman used heart rate measurements and self-reported stress levels to assess how perturbed the participants were during the tasks.

The study found that participants who wore any kind of smile were less stressed during the tasks than those with neutral facial expressions, and stress levels dipped especially low for folks with "genuine" smiles.

According to the authors, this means that even forcing a smile during an unpleasant task or experience might actually lower your stress level, even if you're not feeling happy.

So, Pressman reasoned, "the next time you are stuck in traffic or are experiencing some other type of stress, you might try to hold your face in a smile for a moment. Not only will it help you 'grin and bear it' psychologically, but it might actually help your heart health as well."

More information

There's more on managing stress at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

-- E.J. Mundell

SOURCE: Psychological Science, news release, July 30, 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. New Stool Test Might Aid in Early Detection of Colon Cancer
2. Depo-Provera Birth Control Might Raise Breast Cancer Risk
3. Brain Falters Near End of Life, but Games, Puzzles Might Slow Decline
4. Infection Might Raise Blood Clot Risk for Older Adults: Study
5. Anxiety Might Help People Sniff Out Threats
6. Lung Cancer Screening Might Pay Off, Analysis Shows
7. Mobile Stroke Units Might Trim Time to Treatment
8. Common Plastics Chemical Might Boost Diabetes Risk
9. Media Multitasking Might Have Mental Upside
10. Brain Surgery Might Ease Tough-to-Treat OCD
11. More Smog Might Mean More Hospitalizations
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Smile! It Might Lower Your Stress Level, Study Shows
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... Florida Hospital presents Heart ... on the St. Louis Blues at the Amalie Arena. The puck drops at 6:00pm, ... heart exhibit, the MEGA Heart, prior to the game. The MEGA Heart will be ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... ... ranked among the top five firms in the “2015/2016 Best in KLAS: Software ... and Staffing. KLAS is a research and insights firm on a global mission ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... In a ... Dallas plastic surgeon , Dr. Rod J. Rohrich, and colleagues, examine and underscore ... outlines recommendations for rhinoplasty surgeons when addressing this vital area. , The upper ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... ... February 11, 2016 , ... "What holds you ... Ray Clarke poses a question as a challenge for his readers to examine ... in the Being" (published by Partridge Singapore), Clarke explores the subject with more ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , ... February 11, 2016 , ... Colorado spine surgeon, ... one of 334 spine surgeons to know in 2016 . The list consists ... field of spine surgery. , Dr. Corenman understands the importance of clinical excellence; ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/11/2016)... and PORTLAND, Ore. , Feb. ... optimization company, is pleased to announce the acquisition of ... community and rural access hospitals. Along with providing traditional ... 340B consulting services to assist clients in navigating the ... Love , CEO of Wellpartner. --> James ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... DUBLIN, February 11, 2016 Transformational M&A ... with Baxalta   --> Transformational M&A achieved through ...   --> Transformational M&A achieved through NPS ... Positioned for future growth with most robust pipeline ... Positioned for future growth with most robust pipeline in ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... , February 11, 2016 ... release of a new research report, titled "Sports Medicine Devices ... Forecast, 2013 - 2019". According to the report, the global ... 4.40% CAGR from 2013 to 2019, growing from a value ... --> --> The global ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: