Navigation Links
Smart scaffolding aims to rebuild tissue from the inside
Date:11/13/2012

Smart scaffolding that can guide cells, proteins and small-molecule drugs to make new tissue and repair damage inside the body is in the works at Rice University.

Scientists at Rice and the Texas A&M Health Science Center Baylor College of Dentistry received a $1.7 million, five-year grantfrom the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a hydrogel that can be injected into a patient to form an active biological scaffold.

Rice bioengineer Jeffrey Hartgerink and co-investigator Rena D'Souza of Baylor won the grant to continue their groundbreaking work on self-assembling, multidomain peptide hydrogels that not only physically support but alsoencourage the growth of specific kinds of tissues.

Bioengineers use scaffolds to mimic the body's extracellular matrix, which supports the growth and maintenance of living cells. Synthetic scaffolds are used as frameworks to form replacement tissues and, perhaps someday, regenerate entire organs from a patient's own cells. Once their work is done, the scaffolds are designed to degrade and leave only natural, healthy tissue behind.

While much of the work to date has focused on creatingtissue in the laboratory for implantation, Hartgerink's aim is to inject scaffolds infused with living cells that will allow the repairs to happen inside the tissue's natural environment.

The peptides designed and prepared at Rice self-assemble into nanofibers that can be triggered to form a hydrogel. "We can then deliver cells, small-molecule drugs and proteins to bring everything together properly in one place," said Hartgerink, an associate professor of chemistry and of bioengineering at Rice. Hydrogels could be designed to interact with stem cells and "get them to do what we want them to do," he said.

Hartgerink and D'Souza, a professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at Baylor currently on aworking sabbatical at Rice's BioScience Research Collaborative, have been pursuing the project for five years. The NIH grant will allow them to focus on the regeneration of the dentin-pulp complex found inside every tooth. The pulp, D'Souza said, is the soft tissue in the roots and crown that keeps the tooth vital and responsive to injury. "If you have a toothache, it's the tissue that's inflamed and has no place to expand. That's why it hurts so much," she said.

Currently, dentists remove inflamed pulp and replace it with an inert rubber-based filler, she said. But injecting stem cell-seeded hydrogels would allow natural pulp to regenerateinto the chamber while stimulating new dentin formation. "Hydrogels have key advantages," D'Souza said. "We can deliver them in a syringe to small spaces that are difficult to access, and the material does not get damaged. Developing this material as a restorative therapy is advantageous to patients as, unlike all other dental materials, this one is biologically active."

The researchers reached a milestone in 2010 when they found a way to have the fibers degrade rather than stay in the body. With the new grant, they hope to start trials of their dental hydrogel within two years, D'Souza said. "I can see potential applications for hydrogel, for example, for spinal cord regeneration or for various eye conditions, where we can restore the vitreous humour," she said.

Hartgerink is glad to have the NIH on board, but noted the grant would not have been possible without initial support from the Welch Foundation. "I've had Welch funding since the day I got here, and it has allowed me to do the preliminary work for all the grants we ended up getting," he said. "It's good to have them in Texas."

D'Souza said the seed grant money provided by the International Association for Dental Research in collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline enabled her laboratory to perform proof-of-concept stem cell experiments. "This is a great example of the huge benefits of interdisciplinary collaboration where, by combining expertise, we can push the frontiers of translational and clinical research forward."


'/>"/>

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. SMART heart eases heart ache, targets cardiac patients emotional well-being
2. Anxiety Linked to Smarts in Brain Study
3. Well-connected brains make you smarter in older age
4. Infant Smarts Similar With Different Types of Formula: Study
5. The Attilio Group’s TAG™-Simply Faster Taps SmartSales To Accelerate Its Expansion Into National Reach
6. Lauren Sciences LLCs research team at Ben-Gurion University awarded Campbell Foundation grant to develop a V-Smart therapeutic for neuro-HIV
7. Dads Smarts May Mean More to His Sons Success Than His Money
8. Engineering the smart health care of the future
9. Engineers improve blood testing technology with smartphone app, hand-held biosensor
10. Sport makes middle-aged people smarter
11. Smartphones Linked to Sexual Activity in Teens: Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/8/2016)... Las Vegas, Nevada (PRWEB) , ... February 08, ... ... Co-Founder at RowdMap, Inc., will be speaking on how healthcare companies can use ... project costs, manage the health of a population and intervene and capture the ...
(Date:2/7/2016)... ... 07, 2016 , ... Women's Excellence staff, in all four locations, wore red ... Red Day is the first Friday each February and a day to bring attention ... 3 deaths among women each year – more than all cancers combined. Go Red ...
(Date:2/6/2016)... ... February 06, 2016 , ... With the FCPX ... warm color grades to their footage. A LUT is a Lookup Table that contains ... the corresponding color indicated by the table. By manipulating each pixel, LUT's can change ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... ... the company's lighter, sleeker next generation LYNX VR Indoor Trainer with multi-rider capability ... in design and manufacturing not only reduce the weight of the unit, they ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... Rosa, CA (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 ... ... pleased to announce the addition of micro-needling services in their Napa Valley office. ... The founders of Plastic Surgery Associates, Dr. Canales and Dr. Furnas, are part ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/5/2016)... --> --> ... the global active pharmaceuticals ingredients (APIs) market stood at ... US$185.9 bn by 2020. It is expected to expand ... The title of the report is "Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients ... by Therapeutic Area) - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... WARSAW, Ind. , Feb. 5, 2016  Zimmer ... the pricing of the previously announced underwritten secondary offering ... of its stockholders, consisting of affiliates of Blackstone and ... public at an initial price of $96.45 per share. ... of the offering.  Neither Zimmer Biomet nor any of ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... 5, 2016  Henry Schein, Inc. (NASDAQ: HSIC ), ... services to office-based dental, animal health and medical practitioners, ... to acquire a majority ownership interest in Dental Cremer ... Brazil . ... Cremer is the dental distribution business of Cremer S.A. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: