Navigation Links
Simple tool may help inexperienced psychiatrists better predict violence risk in patients
Date:9/4/2012

Inexperienced psychiatrists are less likely than their veteran peers to accurately predict violence by their patients, but a simple assessment checklist might help bridge that accuracy gap, according to new research from the University of Michigan.

Led by psychiatrist Alan Teo, M.D., a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar of the University of Michigan, researchers examined how accurate psychiatrists were at predicting assaults by acutely ill patients admitted to psychiatric units.

Their results found that inexperienced psychiatric resident doctors did no better than a coin flip, whereas veteran psychiatrists were 70 percent accurate in predicting risk of violence.

However, when a brief risk assessment tool was applied to the cases that the junior doctors evaluated, their level of accuracy jumped to 67 percent, or nearly as good as the more experienced psychiatrists. Results of the research were published online Sept. 1 in the journal Psychiatric Services.

"The tool we used, called the HCR-20-C, is remarkably brief and straightforward. Like a checklist a pilot might use before takeoff, it has just five items that any trained mental health professional can assess," Teo says.

In light of recent violent events, such as the movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colo,, earlier this summer, Teo says predicting violence risk in psychiatric patients is an increasingly important topic.

"Given public concern about this issue, I think teaching our budding psychiatrists and others how to use a practical tool like this, and encouraging its use in high-risk settings is a no-brainer," he says.

In the study, researchers were able to assess doctors' accuracy by comparing patients who had assaulted hospital staff members with similar patients who had not been violent.

Because all patients received a threat assessment when admitted to the psychiatric unit, the researchers were able to compare a patient's predicted violence risk with whether they actually had a documented assault while in the hospital.

Incidents of physical aggression typically included punching, slapping, or throwing objects, as well as yelling, directed at staff members of the hospital. The patients studied had severe illnesses, often schizophrenia, and had been involuntarily admitted to the hospital.

Teo says this study is the first to compare the predictive success of violence assessment between experienced and inexperienced psychiatrists. The results, he says, highlight the importance of emphasizing violence risk assessment in clinical training programs.

"If trainees are indeed less able than trained and experienced clinicians to accurately perform risk assessments for violence, it's important to figure out a way to improve their accuracy," he says. "Our study shows that evidence-based structured tools might have the potential to augment training and improve risk assessment."


'/>"/>

Contact: Justin Harris
juaha@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Simple new test to combat counterfeit drug problem in developing countries
2. Simple mathematical computations underlie brain circuits
3. Simple Measures May Curb Excessive Weight Gain in Pregnancy
4. Simple Steps Can Shield Children From Dog Bites
5. Simple exercises are an easy and cost-effective treatment for persistent dizziness
6. Simpler lifestyle found to reduce exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals
7. Simple new way to clean traces of impurities from drug ingredients
8. Safe, simple eye test may help save lives by preventing stroke
9. Cancer may require simpler genetic mutations than previously thought
10. Prosthetic retina offers simple solution to restoring sight
11. Simple assault and ground level fall do not require cervical spine CT
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/28/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... March 28, 2017 , ... ... leading physicians, Paul Yost, will begin serving as new board chair for Orange ... month. Yost will serve the remainder of soon-to-be former chair Mark Refowitz’s term, ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... March 28, 2017 , ... In its ongoing effort ... has recently developed and published an informational resource that addresses frequently asked questions. ... common inquiries the site’s team of third party administrator (TPA) contributors regularly receives ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... March 28, 2017 , ... Prominant bariatric surgeon ... is thrilled to offer the recently FDA-approved Obalon Balloon System to his patients. ... SkyLex Advanced Surgical’s already comprehensive list of weight-loss services. Dr. Liu is ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Oily skin is a common and unwelcomed occurrence in people of all ages, ... to offer to the discussion of dealing with excess skin oil. “Oily skin is a ... remedies that can help remove the oily shine while keeping the skin fresh and clean,” ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... Aurora, CO (PRWEB) , ... March 27, 2017 , ... ... Dr. Mark Braasch for leading sleep apnea treatment, with or without a referral. Sleep ... the condition, which can include daytime sleepiness, morning headaches and chronic snoring. , ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/28/2017)... , March 28, 2017  Akcea Therapeutics, a subsidiary ... to the company,s board of directors: ... Partners. Mr. Gabrieli will serve as chairman of the board ... former chief commercial officer of Forest Laboratories. ... Biolink Partners. "We are excited to ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... 28, 2017 RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation (NASDAQ: ... that address significant unmet medical needs, today announced ... Japan Patent Office (JPO) for the composition of ... (CTGF) for the treatment or prevention of fibrotic ... and proliferative retinopathy (Japanese Patent #: 6060071).  This ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... , March 28, 2017  Medeon Biodesign, Inc., ... company, is pleased to announce that the Company ... of Panther Orthopedics, Inc., a San ... fixation solutions for orthopedic extremity applications.  ... expand rapidly, primarily due to procedure volume growth, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: