Navigation Links
Simple fitness test could predict long-term risk for heart attack, stroke in middle-aged people
Date:5/18/2011

DALLAS May 18, 2011 How fast can you run a mile?

If you're middle-aged, the answer could provide a strong predictor of your risk of heart attack or stroke over the next decade or more.

In two separate studies, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found that how fast a middle-age person can run a mile can help predict the risk of dying of heart attack or stroke decades later for men and could be an early indicator of cardiovascular disease for women.

In one recent study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, researchers analyzed the heart disease risk of 45-, 55- and 65-year-old men based on their fitness level and traditional risk factors, such as age, systolic blood pressure, diabetes, total cholesterol and smoking habits. The scientists found that low levels of midlife fitness are associated with marked differences in the lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease.

For example, a 55-year-old man who needs 15 minutes to run a mile has a 30 percent lifetime risk of developing heart disease. In contrast, a 55-year-old who can run a mile in eight minutes has a lifetime risk of less than 10 percent.

"Heart disease tends to cluster at older ages, but if you want to prevent it, our research suggests that the prescription for prevention needs to occur earlier when a person is in his 40s and 50s," said Dr. Jarett Berry, assistant professor of internal medicine and a corresponding author on both studies.

Researchers in this study found that a higher fitness level lowered the lifetime risk of heart disease even in people with other risk factors.

In a separate study in Circulation, UT Southwestern researchers found that the same treadmill test predicts how likely a person is to die of heart disease or stroke more accurately than assessing the risk using only typical prediction tools such as blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Heart disease is a leading killer in industrialized nations and the No. 1 killer of women in the U.S. Women younger than 50 are particularly difficult to assess for long-term cardiovascular risk.

"Nearly all women under 50 years of age are at low risk for heart disease," Dr. Berry said. "However, as women get older, their risk increases dramatically. In our study, we found that low levels of fitness were particularly helpful in identifying women at risk for heart disease over the long term."

For decades, scientists have tried to improve their ability to determine which patients are at highest cardiovascular disease risk. Blood-based and imaging techniques have been used to try to improve risk prediction, but fitness has not been examined until now, Dr. Berry said.

For both studies, researchers collected information from thousands of participants who underwent a comprehensive clinical exam and a treadmill exercise test at the Cooper Clinic in Dallas between 1970 and 2006.

In the JACC study, researchers evaluated more than 11,000 men tested before 1990 women were excluded because of the low number of participants and cardiovascular death rates and found 1,106 who died of heart attack or stroke during the study period. They measured participant fitness levels and traditional risk factors for heart disease. Within each age group, higher levels of fitness were associated with lower levels of traditional risk factors.

For the Circulation study, researchers examined more than 66,000 participants without cardiovascular disease, ages 20 to 90. They were then followed until death or the end of the study period; follow-up lasted up to 36 years. There were 1,621 cardiovascular deaths during the study. The researchers found that by adding fitness to the traditional risk factors, they significantly improved their ability to classify participants' short-term (10 years) and long-term (25 years) risk.

Researchers next will try to extend the JACC investigation parameters to women.


'/>"/>

Contact: LaKisha Ladson
lakisha.ladson@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Simple new bedside screening effectively identifies patients with acute aortic dissection
2. Simple Question Sheds Light on Teens Hopes, Dreams
3. Simple chemical cocktail shows first promise for limb re-growth in mammals
4. Simple blood test detects early emphysema in smokers before symptoms appear
5. Simple blood test at discharge could help reduce hospital readmissions for heart failure patients
6. Radio-guided surgery a safe and simple way to remove potentially cancerous nodules in the lung
7. Simple spit and blood tests might detect burnout before it happens
8. Quick, Simple Test Can Detect Concussion in Athletes
9. Toward a fast, simple test for detecting cholera rampaging in 40 countries
10. Simple feedback could be effective therapy for addictive behaviors
11. Simple Screen May Help Spot Depression in College Students
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/5/2016)... ... May 05, 2016 , ... Vitenas Cosmetic Surgery has been named ... by the American Institute of Architects and the Academy of Architecture for Health. The ... and Harrell Architects, opened to patients in October of 2014. , ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... ... ... TIME for Kids and The ZAC Foundation – a national leader in drowning ... million children with important water safety messages before summer break begins. , ... in children one to 6 years of age. TIME for Kids and The ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... ... May 05, 2016 , ... In order to increase ... patterns, Amerec, a Seattle-based steam bath and sauna manufacturer recently launched amerecConnect™ ... interface of the app, developed for both smartphones and personal computers perfectly emulates ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... ... (PRWEB) May 05, 2016 , ... Talent Tech Labs ... on the eve of National Nurses Week (May 6-12). Currently, HireNurses is ... With their enrollment into the Talent Tech Lab Virtual Incubation program, they will dramatically ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... ... , ... Chronic stress can have a silent, yet dangerous, impact on men’s ... and increase inflammation, both of which raise the risk of heart attack and even ... at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. Chronic stress also can lead to other issues that ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/3/2016)... OSWEGO, Ore. , May 3, 2016   ... the importance of extending care beyond the implant at ... Sessions, May 4-7 in San Francisco ... with continually delivering the highest quality of patient care ... patients are cared for each and every tomorrow," said ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... , May 3, 2016 ... pay $55 million to a woman who says its ... court awarded Gloria Ristesund $5 million in ...      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160330/349511LOGO ) , ... accusations against the company. In February, the same court ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... TUSTIN, Calif. , May 3, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... science teaching tool that shows how a cleanroom ... for classroom discussions about science and technology. ... Manager said, "As a technology company, SSF enthusiastically ... program to help educators foster the next generation ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: