Navigation Links
Simple Test Helps Predict Heart Attack Risk
Date:3/10/2009

Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) Identifies Peripheral Arterial Disease Patients at High Cardiovascular Risk Who Were Missed by Framingham Risk Score in 6,200-Person NHANES Study

SAN DIEGO, Calif., March 10 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The use of common and readily available screening tests--like the ankle brachial index (ABI)--along with traditional risk scoring systems--such as the Framingham Risk Score--has the potential to prevent devastating heart attacks in thousands of individuals who are not originally thought to be at high risk (according to Framingham alone), say researchers at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 34th Annual Scientific Meeting. About 25 percent of all heart attacks or sudden cardiac deaths in the United States occur in individuals thought to be at low risk.

In the study, information was analyzed from the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)--a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of the U.S. population for 6,292 men and women ages 40 and older without known history of heart disease, stroke, diabetes or atherosclerotic vascular disease--along with available data on standard cardiovascular risk factors and screening tests (like the ABI, which is a comparative blood pressure test). For the first time, researchers determined the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in a large population of women and men who were not considered at high risk for cardiovascular disease. And the results are surprising: novel risk factors (those not traditionally considered in the Framingham Risk Score) are abnormal in up to 45 percent of those not considered high risk for coronary heart events.

"This is significant news that can profoundly impact public health. If novel risk factors are shown to improve risk prediction, they could be very valuable because the prevalence of abnormal values is high in populations not known to have high risk," said Timothy P. Murphy, M.D., an interventional radiologist and director of the Vascular Disease Research Center at Rhode Island Hospital in Providence. "These simple tests--like ABI screening--have the potential to improve the accuracy of cardiovascular risk prediction and thereby have significant public health impact by helping identify people for intensive medical therapy and preventing heart attacks and strokes," said Murphy.

While 91 percent of the NHANES group was considered at low or intermediate risk of cardiovascular disease, according to Framingham criteria alone, almost 45 percent of them were found to have at least one of three conditions: an abnormal ABI or elevated plasma fibrinogen or elevated plasma C-reactive protein (CRP). "Even with abnormal ABI, which was the least prevalent of the three novel risk factors evaluated, that number translates into about 2.1 million Americans, age 40 and older, who have no known history of heart disease, stroke, diabetes or atherosclerotic vascular disease," said Murphy. "There is also a good chance that ABI, which actually detects subclinical already-established atherosclerotic disease, may actually perform better in terms of risk prediction than fibrinogen or C-reactive protein because it may be more specific," Murphy said.

About 1.1 million Americans every year have heart attacks, and almost a third of those heart attacks results in death. Another 750,000 individuals experience stroke each year. Risk factors--like smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity--increase one's risk of heart attack and are associated with 75 percent of all heart attacks. However, the other 25 percent of heart attacks or sudden cardiac deaths occur in individuals not known to have risk factors and thought to be at low risk for cardiovascular disease. "The earlier the detection of who's at risk for heart attacks is crucial. Primary prevention--such as initiating lifestyle changes and medical intervention directed at modifying risk factors (smoking cessation, blood glucose and blood pressure control, lowering cholesterol and exercise)--can be started to improve one's health before costlier and more intensive interventions are needed," said Murphy.

"Interventional radiologists often provide PAD screening tests like the ABI. Primary care doctors, who oversee medical management of the vast majority of the public at risk for cardiovascular disease, should partner with interventional radiologists in evaluating patients' risk for cardiovascular disease, as well as for managing established PAD," said Murphy. ABI, used to diagnose PAD, is a painless test that compares the blood pressure in the legs to the blood pressure in the arms to determine how well the blood is flowing and whether further tests are needed. Elevated results for plasma fibrinogen and plasma C-reactive protein, laboratory-based tests, can indicate inflammation.

More information about ABI, cardiovascular disease, and interventional radiology can be found online at www.SIRweb.org.

Abstract 146: "Prevalence of Low Ankle Brachial Index, Elevated Plasma Fibrinogen and CRP Among Those Otherwise at Low-Intermediate Cardiovascular Events' Risk: Data From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004," R. Dhangana, T.P. Murphy, M.B. Ristuccia, J.V. Cerezo and D. Tsai, all with Rhode Island Hospital/Brown University, Providence, R.I.; and M.J. Pencina, Boston University, Boston, Mass., SIR 34th Annual Scientific Meeting March 7-12, 2009. This abstract can be found at www.SIRmeeting.org.

About the Society of Interventional Radiology

Interventional radiologists are physicians who specialize in minimally invasive, targeted treatments. They offer the most in-depth knowledge of the least invasive treatments available coupled with diagnostic and clinical experience across all specialties. They use X-ray, MRI and other imaging to advance a catheter in the body, usually in an artery, to treat at the source of the disease internally. As the inventors of angioplasty and the catheter-delivered stent, which were first used in the legs to treat peripheral arterial disease, interventional radiologists pioneered minimally invasive modern medicine. Interventional oncology is a growing specialty area of interventional radiology.

Today many conditions that once required surgery can be treated less invasively by interventional radiologists. Interventional radiology treatments offer less risk, less pain and less recovery time compared to open surgery. Visit www.SIRweb.org.

An estimated 5,300 people are attending the Society of Interventional Radiology's 34th Annual Scientific Meeting in San Diego.


'/>"/>
SOURCE Society of Interventional Radiology
Copyright©2009 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Simpler Sleep Apnea Treatment Seems Effective, Affordable
2. Simple device can ensure food gets to the store bacteria free
3. I Count(TM): 10 Simple Steps to a Healthy Life: Time and Money-Strapped Americans Find Balance, Better Health with New Book
4. Study Shows Simple Measures May Help Prevent Sudden Death Event in Young Athletes
5. Expert Hypnotherapist Dr. Olga Stevko Offers Clients Simple and Powerful Tools for Lasting Weight Loss; Dr. Olga Combines Hypnotherapy and NLP to Transform Clients' Limi
6. Waking Up And Getting Ready: New Green Guide Advocates Simple Living and Earth-Centered Spirituality
7. Simple Exercise Keeps Brain at Top of Its Game
8. College of American Pathologists Offers Tips on Simple Diabetes Prevention in the New Year
9. One Simple Step to Obtain Health, Happiness, and Longevity in 2009
10. Simple model predicts those at risk for chronic kidney disease
11. A simple questionnaire to replace a doctors exam
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/24/2017)... ... February 24, 2017 , ... The California State ... convening academic faculty engaged in or interested in palliative care education and research. The ... be held in North County San Diego on Sept. 28 and 29, 2017, on ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... February 24, 2017 , ... The International ... 7th annual “Imagine Me Beyond What You See” body image mannequin art competition. Selected ... will be showcased and the winner revealed at the 31st annual iaedp Symposium, March ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... February 24, 2017 , ... The ... for excellence in radiology marketing programs at the annual Building Better Radiology Marketing ... Renaissance Fort Worth Hotel in Fort Worth, Texas. Nine awards are given out in ...
(Date:2/24/2017)... CA (PRWEB) , ... February 24, 2017 , ... ... for qualifying into the Senior International Elite division on February 12th. Ms. ... Around divisions at the elite qualifier competition held in Las Vegas, Nevada. Frida ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Thinksport, the most award-winning sunscreen on the ... Marin. For the second year in a row, cyclists will stay protected from ... thrilled to provide our safe, non-toxic sunscreen to over 2,000 cycling enthusiasts again ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/23/2017)... Feb. 23, 2017 Nevro Corp. (NYSE: NVRO), a ... for the treatment of chronic pain, today reported financial results ... 2016. 2016 Accomplishment & Highlights: ... 2016, an increase of 228% as reported, over the prior ... an increase of 612% over the prior year ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... 2017 Research and Markets has announced the ... 2016" report to their offering. ... The latest research Fibromyalgia Drugs Price Analysis ... the global Fibromyalgia market. The research answers the following ... for Fibromyalgia and their clinical attributes? How are they positioned in ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... PUNE, India , February 23, 2017 ... "Diagnostic Imaging Market by Product (X-ray Imaging Digital, Analog), ... PET)), Application (OB/GYN, MSK, Cardiology, Oncology), End User (Hospitals, ... MarketsandMarkets, the report studies the global market over the ... expected to reach ~USD 36.43 Billion by 2021, at ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: