Navigation Links
Simple MRIs Safe for Children, Study Says
Date:10/7/2011

By Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Exposing children to MRIs during pediatric clinical trials is not unduly risky to their well-being as long as sedation and injectable dyes aren't used, new Canadian research concludes.

The study finds that MRIs, when used without additional intravenous contrast dyes or sedation, pose no greater physical or psychological harm to healthy children than routine activities such as playing sports or riding in a car.

However, injectable contrast dyes, which are used to improve scan resolution, may pose an unreasonable allergic-reaction risk that is greater than that posed by, for example, routine vaccinations, the researchers found.

Similarly, using sedation during imaging sessions appears to raise the risk for side effects, such as gastrointestinal issues and motor imbalance, to a level considered unsafe for children.

Lead author Dr. Matthias H. Schmidt, an associate professor in the department of radiology at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, reported his team's findings in the September/October issue of IRB: Ethics & Human Research.

Schmidt and his colleagues noted that research ethics review boards have long struggled with the question of MRI safety in the context of pediatric research.

The team thus set out to establish so-called "minimal-risk standards" for pediatric imaging exposure safety by analyzing a range of information, including MRI safety data collected by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's "Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience."

The bottom-line: Ice hockey and soccer pose as much, if not more, risk for physical injury to children as MRIs.

While the risk for physical injury to children posed by an hour-long MRI is 17 for every 100,000 imagings, the risk for injury is as high as 12,730 for every 100,000 hours a child under the age of 16 plays ice hockey, the study found.

Similarly, the risk of dying from an MRI scan (four for every 100 million scans) is much less than the risk of dying in a car accident (six for every 100 million car trips for children 14 and under and 40 per hundred million rides for teens 15 to 19), the study revealed.

Also, the risk of suffering psychological hardship, such as claustrophobia and/or noise disturbances, appeared to be greater among children struggling with anxiety disorders than it did among those exposed to an MRI.

But the MRI-associated chance that a child would develop either gastrointestinal issues (an 18 to 37 percent risk) or motor imbalance (a 66 to 85 percent risk) was deemed to be above reasonable safety standards.

And use of a contrast dye appeared to unduly raise the risk for developing a fever, headache or an anaphylaxis reaction.

The team therefore concluded that while MRIs themselves are safe for children in a clinical trial setting, the use of contrast dyes and/or sedation is not, and should be avoided.

"We urge researchers and [research ethics review boards] to collaborate in the ongoing effort to minimize the risk of harm and discomfort associated with pediatric MRI research," the authors said in a news release from the journal publisher.

Meanwhile, Joy Hirsch, a professor of functional neuroradiology, neuroscience and psychology at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, and a director of the CU's Functional MRI Laboratory, expressed little surprise with the Canadian team's observations.

"The FDA has characterized MRI as a minimal risk procedure," she noted. "And this is not something that involves radiation. So, this is not an invasive procedure and there is no incremental risk over time."

"But these are incredibly important questions that are being looked at," Hirsch added. "So you do want to have a clear risk-benefit analysis, and you do want to be careful. So, I would say that if the data suggests that contrast dyes and sedation -- both of which are foreign injects into the body -- are a problem, then we have to listen to the data."

More information

For more on MRIs, visit the American College of Radiology.

SOURCE: Joy Hirsch, M.D., professor, functional neuroradiology, neuroscience and psychology, Columbia University Medical Center, and director, Functional MRI Laboratory, Columbia University Medical Center, New York City; The Hastings Center, news release, Oct. 4, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Father Channels His Grief into Advocacy, Promotes Simple Actions to Make Hospitals Safer for Children
2. Simple Concussion Test Measures Reaction Time
3. UAB-led study shows simple steps could reduce stillbirths by up to 1 million
4. NationalCreditReport.com Offers Simple Tax Saving Tips That Can Improve Credit Scores
5. Many With Arthritis Find Simple Solutions for Relief
6. Simple Forms Help Docs Do Better Breast Exams
7. The Simple and Revolutionary Power to OUTSMART YOUR GENES Out April 6th -- Predictive Medicine Pioneer Dr. Brandon Colby Releases Book
8. Simple Test May Spot Early Lung Cancer
9. Simple Memory Test May Detect Early Alzheimers
10. A Simple Thank You Brings Rewards to All
11. Simple Carbs Pose Heart Risk for Women
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Simple MRIs Safe for Children, Study Says
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... TherapySites, the leading ... with Tennessee Counseling Association. This new relationship allows TherapySites to continue ... Association, adding exclusive benefits and promotional offers. , "TCA is extremely excited about ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... cutting edge technology to revolutionize the emergency ambulance transport experience for the millions ... aware of how Uber has disrupted the taxi industry through the use of ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... PLAINSBORO, N.J. (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... same sources, yet in many ways they remain in the eye of the beholder, ... Oncology (EBO), a publication of The American Journal of Managed Care. For the full ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... Aliso Viejo, California (PRWEB) , ... June 26, 2016 , ... ... for Final Cut Pro X. , "Film editors can give their videos a whole ... artistically," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProSlice Levels ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... ... Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal trainer is helping to develop a weight loss ... plans to fix the two major problems leading the fitness industry today:, ... , They don’t eliminate all the reasons people quit their exercise program ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Revolutionary ... Oticon , industry leaders in advanced audiology ... of Oticon Opn ™, the world,s first internet ... possibilities for IoT devices.      (Photo: ... introduces a number of ,world firsts,: , ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition ... States, China, Japan, Brazil, United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy, ... Surgical Procedure Volumes: Global ... surgical procedure volume data in a geographic context. The ... of growth drivers and inhibitors, including world population growth, ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... WASHINGTON , June 23, 2016  The ... Pharmaceuticals has joined the health policy research organization ... Steven Romano , MD, senior vice president and ... his company,s representative on the NPC Board of ... are pleased that Mallinckrodt has joined us in ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: