Navigation Links
Shoppers Who Read Food Labels Are Thinner, Study Says
Date:9/17/2012

SUNDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- People -- particularly women -- who read food labels while they grocery shop are thinner than people who don't, a new study finds. Women who checked nutritional labels weighed what amounted to nearly 9 pounds less than those who didn't.

The international team of scientists analyzed more than 25,000 observations on health, eating and shopping habits from the U.S. National Health Interview Survey. Among the data collected were responses about reading nutritional information in supermarkets -- if people did and how often.

"First we analyzed who read the nutritional label when purchasing foods, and then we moved on to the relationship with their weight," study lead author Maria Loureiro, of the University of Santiago de Compostela, in Spain, said in a university news release.

Nutrition labels tell consumers how many calories are contained in a food portion, as well as levels of sodium, fats, sugars, protein, dietary fiber and key vitamins and minerals.

The study found big differences between the people who read food labels and those who did not. Smokers, they noted, paid little attention to the nutritional information on foods.

"Their lifestyle involves less healthy habits and, as a consequence, it could be the case that they are not so worried about the nutritional content of the food they eat, according to our results," the researchers suggested.

People who live in cities were the most careful about reading food labels. People with high school and college educations also paid more attention to nutritional labels. Fifty-eight percent of men took the time to read labels, compared with 74 percent of women. White women who lived in cities read food labels most often, the study found.

"In general, the associated impact is higher among women than men. On average, women who read the nutritional information have a body-mass index [a measurement of body fat based on weight and height] of 1.48 points lower, whereas this difference is just 0.12 points in men," Loureiro said. "We know that this information can be used as a mechanism to prevent obesity.

"We have seen that those who read food labels are those who live in urban areas, those with ... high education," she added. "Therefore, campaigns and public policy can be designed to promote the use of nutritional labeling on menus at restaurants and other public establishments for the benefit of those who usually eat out."

The study was published in the journal Agricultural Economics.

More information

Visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to learn more about food labeling and nutrition.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: University of Santiago de Compostela, news release, Sept. 13, 2012


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. People who read food labels stay thinner
2. Color-coded labels improve healthy food choices in employees from all backgrounds
3. Choosing Sunscreen? How to Decode the Labels
4. Study finds drug warning labels need overhaul to better capture attention, convey information
5. Changes needed for oft-ignored prescription warning labels
6. Graphic Cig Pack Labels Make Smokers Think, Study Finds
7. Graphic warning labels improve smokers recall of warning and health risks related to smoking
8. Food-Assistance Program Sees $2 Billion Spent on Sweet Drinks: Study
9. Vitamin D in Pregnancy Critical for Brain Development, Study Says
10. Study suggests gap in treatment of sexually transmitted diseases among teens
11. Biggest European health study identifies key priorities in 26 cities
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Shoppers Who Read Food Labels Are Thinner, Study Says
(Date:2/12/2016)... , ... February 12, 2016 , ... ... devoted exclusively to funding innovative lymphoma research and serving the lymphoma community through ... over 250 members of South Florida’s philanthropic community at its 10th anniversary Fashion ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... February 12, 2016 , ... ... be. With a hectic schedule, a demanding job, and no time to decompress, Rabinowitz ... there, she dedicated herself to meditation for its impact on her life, implementing a ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Itopia, a leader in cloud ... Clarity Intelligence Platform (CIP) into Cielo®, a discovery, migration and cloud orchestration engine. ... their small and medium business (SMB) clients. , In recent years, ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... ... The Jones Agency, a family owned insurance company with offices serving Arlington, Dallas, ... with the Tarrant Area Food Bank in the hopes of alleviating hunger for nearby ... Tarrant County Food Bank offers hope and security to the one in six Texas ...
(Date:2/12/2016)... ... February 12, 2016 , ... Donor Network West, the organ procurement ... announced a partnership with San Ramon Regional Medical Center. Under the collaboration, the first ... a way to accommodate a more certain time frame for donor families for the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/12/2016)... , Maharashtra, February 12, 2016 ... research report titled Chronic Inflammation Global Clinical Trials ... snapshot of the global clinical trials landscape along ... trials by Region, Country (G7 & E7), Trial ... status and reviews top companies involved and enlists ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... Feb. 11, 2016 Stem cells are primitive ... by self-renewal and the capacity to differentiate into mature ... discovery, as the first mouse embryonic stem cells were ... until 1995 that the first culturing of embryonic stem ... were not produced until 2006 As a result of ...
(Date:2/11/2016)... 11, 2016  Kindred Biosciences, Inc. (NASDAQ: KIN ... the lives of pets, today announced the submission to ... Animal Drug Application (NADA) for Zimeta™ (dipyrone injection, KIND-012).  ... of Zimeta for the control of pyrexia (fever) in ... --> --> The Chemistry, Manufacturing, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: