Navigation Links
Sharing Bed With Toddler Won't Harm Development: Study
Date:7/18/2011

By Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Allowing your toddler to share your bed does not lead to behavioral or learning problems down the road, new research suggests.

"The American Academy of Pediatrics currently advises against bed-sharing during the first year of life, due to increased risk of SIDS [sudden infant death syndrome]," noted study co-author Lauren Hale, an associate professor of preventive medicine in the Graduate Program of Public Health at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. "However, very little research has investigated the potential developmental consequences of bed-sharing during toddlerhood," she added.

"We found that, after adjusting for mother and child characteristics, there were no observed cognitive or behavioral differences between children who bed-share and those who don't," Hale said.

Hale and her colleagues present their findings in the August issue of Pediatrics.

The team's current effort focused on 944 low-income families who had at least one child under the age of 1 at the start of the study.

Participants included roughly equal amounts of boys and girls. Among the children's mothers, about 30 percent were black, 25 percent were Hispanic and almost 40 percent were white.

The authors visited each family as the children turned 1, 2 and 3, at which point the mothers provided information on their child's health, parenting routines and sleeping arrangements. At age 5, all of the children underwent cognitive and behavioral testing, with a focus on math and literacy skill evaluations along with an assessment of the hyperactivity levels and social skills.

The researchers found that black and Hispanic families were more likely to bed-share with their toddlers than were white families.

Regardless, after controlling for a host of factors (including child gender, birth weight, ethnicity, economic status and maternal education) the authors found no link between toddlers who bed-shared and the onset of either cognitive or behavioral problems by the age of 5.

Hale said the findings suggest that bed-sharing is not necessarily a bad idea for toddlers.

So, she advised, "parents should make decisions about sleeping arrangements based on their specific family circumstances, with the goal of facilitating the best possible sleep for their children."

Dr. Nina Sand-Loud, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Dartmouth Medical School and a developmental-behavioral pediatrician with Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, agreed.

"I think each family has to work out what's best for them, in terms of what works best for their child and their child's sleep on a day-to-day basis," she said.

Also commenting on the study, Michelle M. Garrison, a research scientist with the Seattle Children's Research Institute, focused on the notion that what matters "is not so much bed-sharing itself, but rather how exactly parents go about it."

Garrison explained that "some children fall asleep in their parents' bed on their own, and then their parents get into bed later. Others fall asleep with their parents in bed at the time. And that makes a difference. Toddlers who fall asleep on their own tend to sleep more restively. And good quality sleep really does have an impact on behavioral and cognitive issues down the line," she noted.

"So bed-sharing is not necessarily something to be advised against," Garrison said. "It can actually be a positive thing. But it's just a matter of figuring out how you are going to go about it."

Regardless, Sand-Loud stressed that parents should not interpret the findings as encouragement to begin bed-sharing while children are still infants.

"It's still important to emphasize the increased risk for SIDS before 1 year of age in terms of bed-sharing," she noted. "And I would be concerned that people misconstrue from this work that it might be OK to bed-share a little bit earlier with infants just because it might be OK to do so later with toddlers. That is not the case."

More information

For more on kids and sleep, visit the Nemours Foundation.

SOURCES: Lauren Hale, associate professor, preventive medicine, Graduate Program, Public Health, State University of New York, Stony Brook, N.Y.; Michelle M. Garrison, Ph.D., research scientist, Seattle Children's Research Institute; Nina Sand-Loud, M.D., assistant professor, pediatrics, Dartmouth Medical School, and developmental-behavioral pediatrician, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, N.H.; August 2011, Pediatrics


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Having trouble sharing or understanding emotions? MU researcher believes affection could help
2. Study: Facebook photo sharing reflects focus on female appearance
3. Study reveals security weaknesses in file-sharing methods used in clinical trials
4. Sharing child caregiving may increase parental conflict, study finds
5. FDA Weighs In as Sharing of Breast Milk Booms
6. Eliminating or reducing cost-sharing for high-value prescription drugs improves medication use
7. Health Care Reform: Employees Face Greater Cost-Sharing
8. California Family Raising Confident, Blind Child Sharing Successes to Change Perceptions of Blindness
9. Expert Insights on Health Data Sharing, Collaboration, Quality and Meaningful Use Featured in Latest Carefx Position Paper
10. Super Fitness Bikini Model Mega-Mogul Jennifer Nicole Lee Goes Global, British TV Appearance, QVC London May 12th Sharing Top Fitness Products
11. Sharing Miracles Television Program to Feature Legendary College Football Coach Bobby Bowden
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Sharing Bed With Toddler Won't Harm Development: Study
(Date:5/26/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... According to ... In an industry filled with chemical-laden beauty products, one company is going against the ... for you: Mad Hippie. The rising star in the green space is proud to ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... has been hired as FluidEdge’s Vice President of Business Intelligence and Informatics, effective ... Wolf has demonstrated success leading teams as a healthcare business and financial strategist ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... FL (PRWEB) , ... May ... ... has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke ... , This achievement, a second for Memorial Healthcare System, recognizes its ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... City, MO (PRWEB) , ... May 25, 2016 , ... ... collegiate, and amateur athletics, The National Center for Drug Free Sport (Drug Free Sport®) ... Free Sport”. This conference, to be held July 12 – 13 in Kansas City, ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... 25, 2016 , ... According to an article published April 14th ... effectively fight against common bacteria and protect against surgical site infections. The article explains ... repair surgery even safer and could further reduce the risk of surgery related ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... -- According to Kalorama Information, the world market for ... these are challenging times in the market, there ... companies that remain optimistic and seek innovation.  Toward ... medical device companies spend a higher percentage of ... do companies in other industries.  Also, in addition ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... 2016 MedDay, a biotechnology company focused ... oral presentation entitled "High doses of biotin in progressive multiple ... given by Professor Ayman Tourbah , Principal Investigator of ... European Academy of Neurology (EAN) in Copenhagen, Denmark ... will take place on Sunday, 29 May 2016 from 14:45 ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... 2016   ... primären Endpunkte und demonstriert Ebenbürtigkeit bei der ... ‚ausgezeichneter plus guter , Reinigung ...      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130829/633895-a ) , ... Daten von der MORA-Studie der Phase III für ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: