Navigation Links
Sex matters: Guys recognize cars and women recognize birds best
Date:9/17/2012

Women are better than men at recognizing living things and men are better than women at recognizing vehicles.

That is the unanticipated result of an analysis Vanderbilt psychologists performed on data from a series of visual recognition tasks collected in the process of developing a new standard test for expertise in object recognition.

"These results aren't definitive, but they are consistent with the following story," said Gauthier. "Everyone is born with a general ability to recognize objects and the capability to get really good at it. Nearly everyone becomes expert at recognizing faces, because of their importance for social interactions. Most people also develop expertise for recognizing other types of objects due to their jobs, hobbies or interests. Our culture influences which categories we become interested in, which explains the differences between men and women."

The results were published online on Aug. 3 in the Vision Research journal in an article titled, "The Vanderbilt Expertise Test Reveals Domain-General and Domain-Specific Sex Effects in Object Recognition."

"Our motivation was to assess the role that expertise plays in object recognition with a new test that includes many different categories, so we weren't looking for this result," said Professor of Psychology Isabel Gauthier. She directs the lab where post-doctoral fellow Rankin McGugin conducted the study.

"This isn't the first time that sex differences have been found in perceptual tasks. For example, previous studies have shown that men have an advantage in mental rotation tasks. In fact, a recent study looking only at car recognition found that men were better than women but attributed this to the male advantage in mental rotation. Our finding that women are better than men at recognizing objects in other categories suggests that this explanation is incorrect."

Discovery of the sex effect in object recognition also casts doubt on several studies that claim an individual's ability to recognize faces is largely independent of his or her ability to recognize objects.

"Face recognition abilities are exciting to study because they have been found to have a clear genetic basis," said Gauthier, "and many studies conclude that abilities in face recognition are not predicted by abilities in object recognition. But this is usually based on comparing faces to only one object category for men and women."

It took the multi-category analysis to reveal that face recognition abilities are correlated to the ability to recognize different object categories for men and women. For example, men who are better at recognizing vehicles also tend to be better at recognizing faces, while women who are better at recognizing living things tend to be better at recognizing faces.

The researchers modeled their new test after the well-established Cambridge Face Memory Task, which effectively measures a person's ability to recognize faces. After familiarizing themselves with a number of images, participants are shown three images at a time one from the study group and two that they haven't seen before and then are asked to pick out the image that they had studied.

While one goal of the new study was to compare object and face recognition skills, another goal was to develop a better way to measure who has exceptional skills in one domain: how to find the experts in the recognition of cars or birds or even mushrooms. To do this, the Vanderbilt researchers reasoned that performance on any category of interest needed to be compared to performance on many other categories, to ensure that the self-proclaimed bird expert is not only better with birds than most people, but also better with birds than with most other categories. So they designed the new test with eight categories of visually similar objects: leaves, owls, butterflies, wading birds, mushrooms, cars, planes and motorcycles.

To evaluate the new test, they administered it to 227 subjects 75 male and 82 female with a mean age of 23. When the results of the entire group were analyzed, the researchers found that increasing the number of categories revealed a large sex difference: Women proved significantly better at recognizing living things while men were better at recognizing vehicles. In addition, the researchers administered a face recognition test to about half of the participants, which allowed them to determine the correlation between vehicle recognition and face recognition in men and the correlation between recognition of living things and faces in women.


'/>"/>

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. Wayne State University researcher recognized by American Psychological Association
2. More Patients With Irregular Heartbeat Recognize Stroke Risk: Survey
3. Many Heart Attacks May Go Unrecognized in Seniors
4. Leading cancer specialists from Europe and beyond recognized at ESMO 2012
5. Healthcare researchers recognized at SingHealth Duke-NUS Scientific Congress 2012
6. Performance Mobility Recognized for Exceptional Customer Satisfaction
7. HCRI Recognized as Center of Innovation for Stuttering Therapy
8. San Diego Physician to be Recognized at White House for Progress in Health IT
9. Young investigators recognized for research excellence at Sao Paolo meeting
10. Simple test to predict if pregnant women will give birth prematurely
11. Mammographys Benefits Outweigh Harms for Older Women: Study
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Sex matters: Guys recognize cars and women recognize birds best
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... ... broad access to life-saving drugs and rewarding the innovators who develop those drugs often ... , That was the message from Dana Goldman, PhD, Leonard D. Schaeffer Chair and ... who served as the keynote speaker for Western University of Health Sciences’ Ray Symposium ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... , ... April 21, 2017 , ... ... Christopher Salas-Wright finds that youth violence is declining—and at noteworthy rates. Between 2002 ... proportion of young people involved in violence in the United States. The study, ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... Evoke Therapy Programs , ... kicked off its 4th annual Forum for Innovative Treatment Solutions (FITS), which runs ... Therapy for Mental Health and Addiction.” , FITS’ 2017 keynote presenters will ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... Young Asset Protection, ... to communities throughout the greater Pittsburgh metropolitan region, is joining forces with the ... bicycles for differently-abled children. , Variety the Children’s Charity is a national organization ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... The adage “Show, don’t tell” applies ... project in the company’s esteemed VISION House demonstration project series. Manifesting the concept of ... of resources they need to live affordably and abundantly without unduly taxing the resources ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... April 20, 2017   ZappRx, Inc ., a digital ... prescribing process, today announced it closed $25 million in Series ... capital firm based in Seattle that ... Partners . The Series B round included participation from ... 2014, and GV (formerly Google Ventures). As part ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... April 20, 2017 Research and Markets ... Size, Market Share, Application Analysis, Regional Outlook, Growth Trends, Key ... to their offering. ... global pharmacogenomics market was valued at US$ 7,167.6 Mn in ... 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 5.6% from 2016 to ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... April 20, 2017 NeuroVive Pharmaceutical AB ... announced positive preclinical results demonstrating anti-fibrotic effects ... non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), in an additional well-validated ... NV556 has previously shown similar anti-fibrotic effects ... NeuroVive,s scientists present novel data demonstrating anti-fibrotic ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: