Navigation Links
September 2009 Mayo Clinic Women's HealthSource Highlights Ovarian Cancer, Salt and Breaking a Sweat

ROCHESTER, Minn., Sept. 16 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Here are highlights from the September issue of Mayo Clinic Women's HealthSource. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Mayo Clinic Women's HealthSource attribution is required. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Include the following subscription information as your editorial policies permit: Visit or call toll-free for subscription information, 800-876-8633, extension 9751.


Clarifying Myths: Ovarian Cancer can Have Early Symptoms, can be Successfully Treated

ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Ovarian cancer is a frightening diagnosis that often comes after the cancer has spread. As a result, it's the most deadly of the gynecological cancers.

But not all the news about ovarian cancer is grim. Incidence is declining. Doctors are learning more about early symptoms and more effective treatments. The September issue of Mayo Clinic Women's HealthSource looks at myths and facts about ovarian cancer.

Myth: There are no early symptoms.

Fact: Many women with ovarian cancer do have early warning signs. However, common symptoms -- abdominal pressure, fullness, swelling or bloating, urinary urgency and pelvic discomfort or pain -- mimic those of many other conditions. It's not unusual for women with ovarian cancer to be diagnosed first with a digestive or bladder disorder. With these concerns, symptoms tend to come and go, occur in certain situations or be related to certain foods. With ovarian cancer, symptoms are likely to occur daily for weeks or months on end. Symptomatic women who have been treated for other health conditions and have not improved should schedule a follow-up visit with their doctor or seek a second opinion.

Myth: Pap tests can detect ovarian cancer.

Fact: Pap tests, also called Pap smears, are designed to detect cervical cancer, not ovarian cancer. Other exams and tests can help detect ovarian cancer but none are helpful for routine screening.

When ovarian cancer is suspected, a doctor will likely perform a pelvic exam to check for masses or growths on the ovaries. Other diagnostic tests include a CA 125 blood test and a transvaginal ultrasound. The protein CA 125 often is elevated in women with ovarian cancer. A transvaginal ultrasound is used to produce detailed images of the ovaries and other reproductive organs.

Myth: Most women with ovarian cancer have a family history of the disease.

Fact: Only 10 to 15 percent of ovarian cancers are inherited. The most important risk factor for ovarian cancer is the presence of inherited mutations in breast cancer genes known as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Other risk factors are personal or family history of breast cancer, obesity, and a woman's age. Most patients with ovarian cancer are postmenopausal.

Myth: Women who have had a hysterectomy can't get ovarian cancer.

Fact: During a hysterectomy, a surgeon removes the uterus and usually the cervix. In some cases, the fallopian tubes and ovaries are removed. If one or both ovaries are left intact, ovarian cancer is possible. There's a very small chance of the disease, even when the ovaries are removed.

Myth: Ovarian cancer is always deadly.

Fact: Ovarian cancer is a serious illness, but it's not always deadly. An estimated 21,550 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2009, and 14,600 will die from the disease. When ovarian cancer is diagnosed and treated early, five-year survival rates are nearly 93 percent. Having a gynecologic oncologist perform the surgery increases survival rates. Combining certain chemotherapy drugs also may improve survival rates and help prevent recurrence, even in women with later stages of the disease.

Pass on the Salt: Most Americans Would Benefit from Lower Sodium Intake

ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Most Americans consume too much salt, contributing to the risk of heart disease and stroke, reports the September issue of Mayo Clinic Women's HealthSource.

"Many people probably are aware that too much sodium can cause or aggravate hypertension, a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke," says Gary Schwartz, M.D., a Mayo Clinic hypertension specialist. "They may be less aware that a high sodium intake can increase the risk of stroke even without an increase in blood pressure."

High sodium intake also can increase the risk of osteoporosis and kidney stones. Studies have shown a relationship between a high-salt diet and stomach cancer.

How much salt is too much? A report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a maximum of 1,500 milligrams (mg) daily for most Americans. That recommendation has been in place since 2005 for people with high blood pressure or at risk of high blood pressure. However, it's new -- and lower -- for most Americans. The previous guideline was 2,300 mg daily, the equivalent of about a teaspoon of salt.

Dr. Schwartz says the average American is eating at least two to three times the recommended daily amount of sodium, and most don't realize it. That's because most sodium isn't coming from the kitchen salt shaker. About 80 percent of consumed salt comes from foods that are processed, canned or purchased in restaurants.

The best way to reduce sodium intake is to eat more fresh foods and less canned and processed foods. Other sodium-reducing tips include:

  • Cut back on eating in restaurants, especially fast-food restaurants.
  • Use unsalted spices in cooking, for example, garlic powder instead of garlic salt.
  • Rinse canned vegetables to remove sodium.
  • Check grocery labels for sodium content and opt for those products with low sodium.

Budget Friendly Fitness: Tips to Break a Sweat Without Breaking the Bank

ROCHESTER, Minn. -- A health club membership isn't a prerequisite for staying in shape. The September issue of Mayo Clinic Women's HealthSource offers suggestions on free and low-cost options to help stay in shape without straining the budget.

Buy used equipment: Some sporting good stores specialize in used equipment. Great deals can be found online too. But be aware that shipping costs might put the cost out of budget range. Shoppers should be cautious about responding to ads, since scams abound.

Buy affordable equipment (or make your own): Hand weights are reasonably priced, available in many sizes, and can be used to strengthen every muscle group. Home-improvised versions work well too. Milk jugs or water bottles filled with varying levels of water or sand work well as weights. (Secure the tops with duct tape.)

Check out the local recreation department: Many community recreation centers offer discounted fitness classes to local residents. High school or college fitness centers or swimming pools also may be open to community members.

Use exercise DVDs: Practice aerobics, yoga, strength training and tai chi with DVDs. They are available to buy or rent. Libraries are a good source, too.

Share costs with a friend: Trade exercise DVDs with a friend. Find a personal trainer who is open to you sharing sessions with a friend or two.

Know what to avoid: Some fitness products aren't worth buying, no matter how low the price. Avoid products that offer instant fitness benefits or promise to melt away pounds without diet and exercise. Avoid products that focus on one body part, such as abs or thighs.

Make the most of everyday activities: Walking, gardening, taking the stairs, and playing with children or grandchildren offer free fitness benefits.

Mayo Clinic Women's HealthSource is published monthly to help women enjoy healthier, more productive lives. Revenue from subscriptions is used to support medical research at Mayo Clinic. To subscribe, please call 800-876-8633, extension 9751, (toll-free) or visit

SOURCE Mayo Clinic
Copyright©2009 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Hospira to Present at the Bear Stearns 20th Annual Healthcare Conference on September 11
2. Gerresheimer to be Included in the SDAX Early Decision on Inclusion in the MDAX on September 5, 2007
3. Mega Events in September Allow Heart Health Campaign to Reach Tens of Thousands of Hispanics During Cholesterol Awareness Month
4. September: Time to Try Cholesterol-Free Soyfoods
5. Somanetics Corporation to Release Third Quarter 2007 Financial Results and Host Conference Call September 19
6. AMN Healthcare Services to Host Analyst Day on Tuesday, September 18, 2007
7. Par Pharmaceutical Files Form 10-K for 2006 -- Company to Hold First Analysts Meeting September 28, 2007
8. Authentidate Holding Corp. to Report Fourth Quarter and Fiscal 2007 Year End Results on Thursday, September 13, 2007
9. West Coast Bank Will Sponsor the Doernbecher Freestyle on September 22, 2007
10. On September 7th Local Organizations Partner to Celebrate Healthy Steps
11. Flu Vaccinations Begin on September 29 Maxim Health Systems to Provide 24,000 Flu Shot Clinics Nationwide
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/27/2015)... , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... the toilets were," said an inventor from Hillside, N.J. "Many people catch diseases ... cover so that individuals will always be protected from germs." , He developed ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... Aliso Viejo, CA (PRWEB) , ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... exclusively for use in Final Cut Pro X. With ProSidebar: Fasion, video editors ... banners, or use ProSidebar as a minimalist title opener. Utilize presets featuring self-animating ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... November 27, 2015 , ... ... well-respected Microsoft Dynamics SL User Group (MSDSLUG). Recognized as Microsoft’s official group for ... of Microsoft Dynamics SL software users, partners, industry experts and representatives. Intellitec Solutions’ ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... 27, 2015 , ... Keeping in mind challenges faced by ... wellness consultation, has collaborated with a leading web-based marketplace for extra-curricular activities for ... parents and bring advice from parenting experts within their reach. As a part ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... ... ... Dr. Thomas Dunlap and Dr. Patrick Coleman , cardiologist ... Medicine at St., Joseph Health System’s Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital , co-hosted the ... ways and require time-critical intervention to avoid large area heart damage and progressive infections ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/29/2015)... , Nov. 29, 2015  At this year,s ... to experience the most complete mobile C-arm portfolio with ... is Ziehm Vision RFD 3D, the world,s only 3D ... edge length per scan volume. In addition, Ziehm Imaging ... motorized mobile C-arm in four axes which is ideally ...
(Date:11/29/2015)... Iowa , Nov. 29, 2015 ... ultrasound guidance technology at the Radiological Society of ... in Chicago November 29 ... system is designed to offer customers unrivaled versatility, ... --> ...
(Date:11/27/2015)... UTRECHT , Pays-Bas, November 27, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... combiner l,immunothérapie au traitement photodynamique au Bremachlorin contre ... Une nouvelle approche consistant à combiner l,immunothérapie au ...    --> Une nouvelle ... au Bremachlorin contre le cancer avancé.    ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: